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BUSINESS
September 19, 2003 | From Reuters
Enron Corp. said that it filed an amended joint Chapter 11 plan and disclosure plan with the U.S. Bankruptcy Court, updating the estimated recoveries for more than 350 classes of creditors holding unsecured debt. Houston-based Enron, which filed for bankruptcy protection in December 2001, now estimates Enron Corp. debt holders will recover 16.6 cents on the dollar, Enron North America debt holders will recover 19.5% and Enron Power Marketing Inc. creditors will see net recovery of 22.5%.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel
NEW YORK -- Jeffrey Skilling, the former chief executive of defunct energy giant Enron Corp., could win early release from prison in a deal with the Justice Department, according to a report Thursday. CNBC said Skilling's attorneys and the Justice Department were discussing a deal, but that it was unclear how much his sentence could be shortened. Skilling, who was convicted on charges of conspiracy, fraud and insider trading, has been serving a 24-year sentence since 2006. Quiz: How well do you remember 2012?
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BUSINESS
April 29, 2004
Enron Corp. has agreed to settle charges by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission that it sought to illegally manipulate natural gas prices. But because other creditors have claims against Enron, now in Chapter 11 bankruptcy, the board is not expected to collect the $35-million penalty.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2008 | Juan A. Lozano, The Associated Press
Three British bankers were sentenced Friday to just over three years in prison for their roles in a fraudulent scheme with former Enron Chief Financial Officer Andrew S. Fastow. A federal judge sentenced David Bermingham, Giles Darby and Gary Mulgrew each to 37 months.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Enron Corp., the once-dominant energy trader whose collapse in 2001 led to sweeping corporate reforms, said Thursday that its bankruptcy reorganization was completed, and that it canceled its near-worthless shares. The company said it sold the largest of its remaining business assets, and would become a shell company.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2005 | From Associated Press
Enron Corp. will return its Northwestern utility to its pre-Enron form as an independent, investor-owned business in light of Oregon regulators' decision to block its sale to a Texas-based private investment firm, the company said. Enron said it had abandoned the deal to sell Portland General Electric to a holding company backed by Texas Pacific Group. That proposal failed to pass muster with Oregon regulators last month.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jeffrey McMahon, the former chief financial officer of Enron Corp., has agreed to pay $300,000 to settle fraud charges, the Securities and Exchange Commission said. McMahon also agreed to be barred from serving as an officer or director of a public company for five years, the SEC said. He agreed to the settlement without admitting or denying the charges.
BUSINESS
January 11, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Portland General Electric, a unit of Enron Corp., won't face a delay in an investigation of allegations of market manipulation during California's energy crisis, a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission judge ordered. The decision by FERC Chief Administrative Law Judge Curtis Wagner means that hearings on whether Enron and other companies encouraged power shortages in California to boost prices set to begin April 1 will go ahead as planned.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2004 | From Associated Press
Leslie Caldwell, head of the Justice Department team prosecuting executives of Enron Corp., is stepping down after more than a year on the job. Caldwell's replacement as director of the Enron Task Force will be the current deputy, Andrew Weissmann, who will take over after a brief transition, the department said. The announcement said Caldwell, who has been a federal prosecutor in San Francisco and New York, was leaving to pursue unspecified opportunities.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Lawyers who recovered about $7.2 billion in settlements for Enron Corp. investors hurt by the energy trader's collapse are slated to get about $700 million in fees under a plan to distribute the money. Officials of the University of California Regents, the lead plaintiffs in the securities-fraud case, said they would ask a judge in Houston to approve the plan so they could begin paying out funds from settlements with Enron's former lenders.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2008 | David G. Savage, Times Staff Writer
The Supreme Court on Tuesday rejected a lawsuit from Enron Corp. investors who sought to recover more than $30 billion from Wall Street investment bankers who they alleged had schemed with the failed Houston energy trading firm. Without comment, the justices dismissed an appeal from pension and investment funds, including the University of California. The funds had argued that all the key players in the Enron debacle should be held liable for their losses.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Deutsche Bank agreed to pay Enron Corp. $25 million and to give up $416 million in unsecured claims to resolve litigation filed by the defunct energy trader during its bankruptcy. In exchange, Enron won't dispute $378 million in unsecured claims the German bank has against it. Deutsche Bank also accepted $35 million to surrender its interests in three transactions. The proceeds, expected to exceed $100 million, will be distributed to Enron's creditors.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Three British bankers who were set to go to trial for their roles in a fraudulent scheme with former Enron Corp. Chief Financial Officer Andrew S. Fastow changed their pleas to guilty Wednesday. David Bermingham, Giles Darby and Gary Mulgrew originally pleaded not guilty to seven counts of wire fraud. Prosecutors alleged that they colluded with Fastow in a secret financial scam in 2000 to enrich themselves at their employers' expense.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2007 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The San Diego law firm founded by William S. Lerach, who is awaiting sentencing in a criminal conspiracy case, is asking a judge to approve nearly $700 million in attorney fees for its efforts to help Enron Corp. shareholders and investors recoup billions they lost after the energy company collapsed. If approved, the attorney fees would be the largest in a securities fraud case. Lerach's personal take could be as much as $50 million, according to a report Wednesday in the Wall Street Journal.
BUSINESS
November 16, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A judge says the federal government can proceed with its attempt to seize nearly $13 million from the estate of Enron Corp. founder Kenneth L. Lay. U.S. District Judge Ewing Werlein rejected a request from Lay's widow to halt the government's bid for the money, which prosecutors claim were "proceeds of the fraud proven in the criminal case against Lay." Kenneth Lay had been convicted in May 2006 of 10 counts of fraud, conspiracy and lying to banks in two separate cases.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Imprisoned former Enron Chief Executive Jeffrey K. Skilling asked Friday for a new trial, saying the Justice Department used incorrect legal theories and "coercive and abusive tactics" to win a conviction, including threatening witnesses. Skilling was sentenced in October to more than 24 years in prison for his role in the collapse of Enron Corp. He was convicted along with founder Kenneth L. Lay in May 2006, on 19 counts of fraud, conspiracy, insider trading and lying to auditors.
BUSINESS
December 2, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Lawyers for former Enron Corp. executives Kenneth L. Lay and Jeffrey K. Skilling failed to prove that government prosecutors intimidated potential defense witnesses to keep them from testifying, a judge ruled. U.S. District Judge Sim Lake made his ruling in Houston. Lay, Enron's former chairman; Skilling, its former chief executive; and Richard A. Causey, a former chief accountant, are to go on trial Jan. 17 on fraud and conspiracy charges stemming from the 2001 collapse of Enron.
BUSINESS
July 28, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Lawyers who recovered about $7.2 billion in settlements for Enron Corp. investors hurt by the energy trader's collapse are slated to get about $700 million in fees under a plan to distribute the money. Officials of the University of California Regents, the lead plaintiffs in the securities-fraud case, said they would ask a judge in Houston to approve the plan so they could begin paying out funds from settlements with Enron's former lenders.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2007 | From the Associated Press
More than 20,000 former Enron Corp. employees who finally received the first payment from a portion of millions in retirement funds lost during the company's collapse have been told they were either overpaid or underpaid because of a computer glitch. Now some ex-workers might have to pay back money if they got too much.
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