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Ensemble Studio Theatre

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
What has happened to the Ensemble Studio Theatre? It used to be a serious smaller theater, but its "Romeo and Juliet" is a workshop effort of no distinction whatsoever. Director Jeff Miller does have an idea about the play, sort of. He wants to make it a today "Romeo and Juliet," with the players dressed up in thrift-shop motley (by Roslyn Moore) and competing with their images on onstage TV screens, which are comically slow to warm up. There are also references to "West Side Story."
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NEWS
March 28, 2002 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A person can be hit over the head with only so much symbolism before wanting to hit back. That exasperation level doesn't take long to reach while sitting through "And Still the Dogs." Every character is an archetype, every line a political statement in first-time playwright Brian Cousins' cautionary tale about an American businessman tangled in a dangerous liaison with an Eastern European beauty. The result is a sort of Eastern European "M.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE and DON SHIRLEY
The Company of Angels could use a few wealthy angels. The April 27 fire that struck the company's home, at Vine Street and Waring Avenue in Hollywood, has left the theater "unsalvageable," said board president Paul Brennan. Nevertheless, at a meeting Monday of 150 members and friends of the oldest ongoing small theater in Los Angeles, it was agreed, as Brennan declared, that "the Company of Angels will continue.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1994
I was quite active in the Los Angeles theater scene throughout the '60s, '70s and '80s, having run the Hollywood Center Theatre for 14 years. However, no time during my so-called "heyday" did I witness the level of acting I witnessed recently at the Fountain Theatre in Hollywood in their bill of one acts being presented under the title of "Summer Shorts." My sincere congratulations to this theater, which is presenting Ensemble Studio Theatre, the L.A. Project. GERALD GORDON, Gerald Gordon Enterprises, Van Nuys
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1988 | ROBERT KOEHLER
How many ways can "Hamlet" be done? The L.A. Repertory Company recently did it with six actors. I once saw a "Hamlet" in London without the ghost; instead, the Prince was possessed by his father's spirit. It worked, but "Hamlet," because of its internal mysteries and theatrics, and its blurring of madness and sanity, is vulnerable to sometimes thoughtless directorial tinkering. Director Mark Ringer has decided to do something different at Theatre Exchange: "Hamlet" straight and with minor cuts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1987 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
ABC has now confirmed that the first in its recently announced program of hourlong to 90-minute dramatic specials is to be Harold Pinter's "The Dumb Waiter." It will be directed by Robert Altman but its stars are a surprise: John Travolta and Tom Conti. Pinter's "The Room" will follow and casting for it is "in progress." "These are the first dramatic specials in the hour format that we've done in years," said Gary L.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Ensemble Studio Theatre, beset by financial difficulties, will leave its East Hollywood home at the end of February. Vicki Williams, a spokeswoman for the theater, says the group can no longer afford the "more than $3,000 in rent and other costs" and is looking for a new theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1991
Thank you for Sheila Benson's illuminating and witty "Frida Kahlo: From Cult Figure to Mainstream" (May 21). Since she was kind enough to ask who should be cast in the movies planned on Kahlo's life, I'll offer my opinion. She is Karmin Murcelo, who portrayed Frida in a play by Marion Wagman at the Ensemble Studio Theatre. It was an inspired, layered and deeply involving performance that met the "extraordinary challenge" Benson speaks of. KATHRYN O'LOUGHLIN Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1994
I was quite active in the Los Angeles theater scene throughout the '60s, '70s and '80s, having run the Hollywood Center Theatre for 14 years. However, no time during my so-called "heyday" did I witness the level of acting I witnessed recently at the Fountain Theatre in Hollywood in their bill of one acts being presented under the title of "Summer Shorts." My sincere congratulations to this theater, which is presenting Ensemble Studio Theatre, the L.A. Project. GERALD GORDON, Gerald Gordon Enterprises, Van Nuys
NEWS
March 28, 2002 | DARYL H. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A person can be hit over the head with only so much symbolism before wanting to hit back. That exasperation level doesn't take long to reach while sitting through "And Still the Dogs." Every character is an archetype, every line a political statement in first-time playwright Brian Cousins' cautionary tale about an American businessman tangled in a dangerous liaison with an Eastern European beauty. The result is a sort of Eastern European "M.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1991
Thank you for Sheila Benson's illuminating and witty "Frida Kahlo: From Cult Figure to Mainstream" (May 21). Since she was kind enough to ask who should be cast in the movies planned on Kahlo's life, I'll offer my opinion. She is Karmin Murcelo, who portrayed Frida in a play by Marion Wagman at the Ensemble Studio Theatre. It was an inspired, layered and deeply involving performance that met the "extraordinary challenge" Benson speaks of. KATHRYN O'LOUGHLIN Santa Monica
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1989 | DON SHIRLEY
On the move: The Odyssey Theatre Ensemble must leave its quarters in West Los Angeles by the end of June. The new owner of the building at Santa Monica Boulevard and Bundy Drive reportedly plans to lease it to a tenant who will convert it into a video rental emporium. A total triumph for canned entertainment over live theater? Not quite. The Odyssey, moving into its 20th anniversary season, will relocate, although its next address is still unknown.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Ensemble Studio Theatre, beset by financial difficulties, will leave its East Hollywood home at the end of February. Vicki Williams, a spokeswoman for the theater, says the group can no longer afford the "more than $3,000 in rent and other costs" and is looking for a new theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1988 | ROBERT KOEHLER
How many ways can "Hamlet" be done? The L.A. Repertory Company recently did it with six actors. I once saw a "Hamlet" in London without the ghost; instead, the Prince was possessed by his father's spirit. It worked, but "Hamlet," because of its internal mysteries and theatrics, and its blurring of madness and sanity, is vulnerable to sometimes thoughtless directorial tinkering. Director Mark Ringer has decided to do something different at Theatre Exchange: "Hamlet" straight and with minor cuts.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
What has happened to the Ensemble Studio Theatre? It used to be a serious smaller theater, but its "Romeo and Juliet" is a workshop effort of no distinction whatsoever. Director Jeff Miller does have an idea about the play, sort of. He wants to make it a today "Romeo and Juliet," with the players dressed up in thrift-shop motley (by Roslyn Moore) and competing with their images on onstage TV screens, which are comically slow to warm up. There are also references to "West Side Story."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1988 | SYLVIE DRAKE and DON SHIRLEY
The Company of Angels could use a few wealthy angels. The April 27 fire that struck the company's home, at Vine Street and Waring Avenue in Hollywood, has left the theater "unsalvageable," said board president Paul Brennan. Nevertheless, at a meeting Monday of 150 members and friends of the oldest ongoing small theater in Los Angeles, it was agreed, as Brennan declared, that "the Company of Angels will continue.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1988 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Enthusiasm. If stage artists don't have it and send it out, audiences won't pick it up. What audiences will drop faster than you can say "Equity Waiver" is forced, calculated enthusiasm--that byproduct of desperation that was palpable almost anywhere you looked in smaller theater this year. You could hear it approaching the box office: Love us, please . The plea is especially loud if you're a critic and the theater depends on your review.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1989 | DON SHIRLEY
On the move: The Odyssey Theatre Ensemble must leave its quarters in West Los Angeles by the end of June. The new owner of the building at Santa Monica Boulevard and Bundy Drive reportedly plans to lease it to a tenant who will convert it into a video rental emporium. A total triumph for canned entertainment over live theater? Not quite. The Odyssey, moving into its 20th anniversary season, will relocate, although its next address is still unknown.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1988 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Enthusiasm. If stage artists don't have it and send it out, audiences won't pick it up. What audiences will drop faster than you can say "Equity Waiver" is forced, calculated enthusiasm--that byproduct of desperation that was palpable almost anywhere you looked in smaller theater this year. You could hear it approaching the box office: Love us, please . The plea is especially loud if you're a critic and the theater depends on your review.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1987 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
ABC has now confirmed that the first in its recently announced program of hourlong to 90-minute dramatic specials is to be Harold Pinter's "The Dumb Waiter." It will be directed by Robert Altman but its stars are a surprise: John Travolta and Tom Conti. Pinter's "The Room" will follow and casting for it is "in progress." "These are the first dramatic specials in the hour format that we've done in years," said Gary L.
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