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Entertainers

NEWS
March 30, 1991
David F. (Mike) Smith, 75, Associated Press photographer who covered presidents and Hollywood stars for 44 years. The Los Angeles-based Smith's subjects included Presidents Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson and Richard M. Nixon, and entertainers Humphrey Bogart, Spencer Tracy, Audrey Hepburn, Gregory Peck and James Stewart. A native of San Diego County, he was a past president of the Press Photographers Assn. of Greater Los Angeles. On Thursday in Burbank of cancer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 1986 | DENNIS HUNT, Terry Atkinson
"On the Boardwalk: the Venice Video." Country People Productions. $19.95. Jeff Jackson's vivid 45-minute documentary gives a sense of how much fun it can be to stroll along the Venice (California) boardwalk on a warm afternoon. People-watching is the primary pastime. With its street entertainers and characters, Venice resembles one of those hippie-era "happenings." In scattered interviews, visitors and boardwalk regulars gush about the area--whose dark side Jackson touches on just briefly.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2011 | By Matt Donnelly, Los Angeles Times
What is it about too many cocktails that make even the most shy want to belt out a glass-shattering rendition of "The Greatest Love of All?" Karaoke is an indelible part of night life, a lowest common denominator and bonding exercise for businessmen, college students and even, say, Sean Penn at a beachside bar. Which is precisely what's going on at Rande Gerber's Malibu spot, Café Habana. Situated in the Malibu Lumber Yard, the eatery is well appointed with wood accents and some palm shrubbery for privacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
There have been a lot of balladeers, a lot of dancers, a lot of clowns, a lot of mimics, a lot of actors who could do both comedy and the heavy stuff. But no one comes to mind who was all of those talents to such a superlative degree as Sammy Davis Jr., who on Wednesday lost his brave battle with throat cancer. He was a one-man variety show, every act on the damnedest vaudeville bill anybody ever watched.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2011 | By Kevin Thomas
The new documentary "Dzi Croquettes" brings to mind San Francisco's legendary gender-bending Cockettes, a collection of drag performers who made no effort to hide their more masculine attributes. But the Dzi Croquettes, a 1970s-era troupe whose members also celebrated their bodies while clad in glitter and spangles, were a much bigger deal. Lennie Dale, a virtuoso Broadway dancer and émigré to Brazil, founded the 13-member group in 1973. Their productions were lavish explosions of creativity and imagination that had wide audience appeal.
OPINION
December 13, 2003
I am a parent of a child with a developmental disability, and I spend some of my nonworking hours raising money to support one of the charities mentioned in "It Pays to Be a Star on Charity Circuit" (Dec. 8). It is extremely upsetting to read that money is being wasted on watches, caviar and private jets for people who can well afford these unnecessary perks, instead of going to support the people who really need help. I know the organization for which I volunteer does good work and the staff is committed to its mission, but all our efforts are now that much more difficult if my friends whom I ask to support this cause question where the dollars they contribute are really being spent.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1989
A "Showdown at the Coliseum"? As a 20-year veteran of Rolling Stones concerts who has seen the Stones on the same bill with many fine artists, I can attest to the fact that there are few feelings comparable to the letdown that occurs the moment the Stones themselves hit the stage. Let's drop this talk about "upstaging"--I don't believe the Stones have played with much passion, or even in tune, for decades--and tip our hats to these master entertainers, canny (and secure) enough to bring us a better show than they can put on themselves.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 1986
I am so glad that Bunzel spoke out against the so-called "national treasure," Bob Hope, and his tasteless, rude and obscene "humor." In 1943, when I was in my teens, Bob Hope and his troupe of World War II entertainers came to Camp Adair in Oregon to supposedly entertain. He was so foul-mouthed, so patently sexist, and just generally filthy that a lot of us, the soldiers included, were embarrassed by him and for him. I haven't noticed that the passing years have improved him any. How he achieved and maintained his status has eluded me ever since.
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