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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2000
The city will get a $3-million federal grant to train entertainment industry union workers for high-tech jobs and skills, the U.S. Department of Labor announced this week. The grant will train approximately 1,500 members of 20 entertainment industry unions that belong to the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees and Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts (IATSE).
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Nick Stepka knew what gift would make his daughter's third birthday a hit, and it wasn't a toy or doll. He gave her a tablet - not a sleek new iPad or a hand-me-down Samsung, but one specifically designed and marketed for little ones. It even came with a purple protective casing and loaded with kids' apps and games. "Her eyes lit up when she opened it," said Stepka, 34, a Shakopee, Minn., father of three. "Everything else got put to the side. " That's exactly what tablet makers and companies that create children's entertainment were hoping for. PHOTOS: Top 10 gadgets we want to see this year Stepka's household is part of a growing group of consumers for whom traditional children's toys and games are not enough.
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BUSINESS
January 26, 2001 | FAYE FIORE and MEGAN GARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The entertainment industry, still black and blue from last year's culture war with Washington, is facing for another round as the new government continues to scrutinize Hollywood's marketing of adult-rated fare to children. With Congress narrowly divided, some in the industry fear that beating up on Hollywood might emerge as one of the few political activities with bipartisan appeal.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Aaron Levie, the 29-year-old chief executive of Box Inc., walked the red carpet at the Oscars this year in a dark suit and tie, pressed white shirt and his trademark neon blue sneakers. "I asked about the sneaker dress code," said Levie, who like many Silicon Valley entrepreneurs doesn't like anything slowing him down, least of all a pair of dress shoes. "Apparently it was not a problem. " It was the movie industry's biggest night and Levie didn't waste any time talking up cloud computing to Hollywood stars including Harrison Ford.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1996 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Louis Rodriguez and his friends at KidShows.Com hope to be part of the next big thing on the Internet's World Wide Web. They're developing "shows" for kids who might prefer an interactive story that can be delivered over the Web to a passive afternoon of watching cartoons on television.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1999
Re "Hollywood Discovers Ventura County," Aug. 4. Although we applaud the efforts of the Ventura County Film Council to promote filming in Ventura County, we want to clarify a fundamental misunderstanding in this article. The article accurately quoted the figure of $351 million from our recent economic impact report as the contribution made by the entertainment industry to Ventura County. But it was followed by an anonymous opinion attributed to the Ventura County Film Council, saying the figure was "inflated because it includes the salaries of stars who do not live in the county."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 1999
A nonprofit organization that offers high school students paying jobs in the entertainment industry is accepting applications for its summer internship program. The goal is to give students, "a view of the real world, as far as the business of entertainment," said Marsha Cole, program coordinator for YES to JOBS. Students will be placed in entry level positions at record companies, television and radio stations, film and production companies and trade publications. The internship lasts 10 weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By Richard Verrier and Kate Linthicum
President Barack Obama put the klieg light on Hollywood Tuesday, crediting the motion picture and television industry for being an engine of growth and a bright spot in a recovering economy. "Entertainment is one of the bright spots of our economy," Obama told a crowd of nearly 2,000 people gathered at the Glendale campus of DreamWorks Animation SKG. "The gap between what we can do and other countries can do is enormous. That's worth cheering about. " Obama was hosted by DreamWorks Animation Chief Executive Jeffrey Katzenberg, who is one of Obama's biggest contributors and fundraisers.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2013 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The Hollywood jobs picture continued to improve last year. Employment in Los Angeles' entertainment industry climbed nearly 4% in 2012, reflecting an upswing in feature film production in the fourth quarter and a surge in commercial shoots, which climbed to a record level last year as major brands spent more money on campaigns to promote their products. The so-called motion picture and sound recording category - including those who work at the major film studios, music labels and post-production houses - employed an average of 129,675 people in 2012, up 3.7% from the average employment in 2011, according to the state Employment Development Department.
BUSINESS
February 3, 2010 | By Richard Verrier
David Tillman, the beleaguered head of the Motion Picture & Television Fund, has resigned, capping a yearlong feud with residents of Hollywood's oldest nursing home and their families. The fund, which operates the nursing home and hospital for entertainment industry workers that are slated to close, said that board member Bob Beitcher, a former chief executive of Panavision, would replace Tillman as chief executive on an interim basis until a successor could be found. Tillman headed the fund for a decade but came under sharp criticism over his handling of the board's controversial decision a year ago to close the Woodland Hills facilities that have been a fixture of the entertainment industry for more than half a century.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Tom Capizzi is going to Hollywood Sunday night for the 86th Academy Awards, but not in a limo or a tux. Instead, he will be protesting near the Dolby Theatre, hoisting a green sign saying "Chase Talent Not Subsidies. " Capizzi will be among hundreds of visual effects workers staging a pre-Oscar rally, hoping to bring attention to the plight of rank-and-file entertainment industry workers who have been hard hit by the flight of film and TV jobs to other states and countries offering rich incentives.
BUSINESS
January 15, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
The 1950s television home of George Burns and Gracie Allen is getting a long-overdue upgrade as part of a $390-million development featuring a sleek new 20-story luxury apartment tower in the heart of Hollywood. The revival of the legendary headquarters of CBS on the corner of Sunset Boulevard and Gower Street will provide a vintage backdrop for the new Columbia Square tower with upscale features aimed at attracting entertainment industry workers. With interior touches by designer Kelly Wearstler, known for her modern interpretations of classic Hollywood glamour, the tower is the second new luxury Hollywood apartment building to bank on a big-name designer to add pizazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By Richard Verrier and Kate Linthicum
President Barack Obama put the klieg light on Hollywood Tuesday, crediting the motion picture and television industry for being an engine of growth and a bright spot in a recovering economy. "Entertainment is one of the bright spots of our economy," Obama told a crowd of nearly 2,000 people gathered at the Glendale campus of DreamWorks Animation SKG. "The gap between what we can do and other countries can do is enormous. That's worth cheering about. " Obama was hosted by DreamWorks Animation Chief Executive Jeffrey Katzenberg, who is one of Obama's biggest contributors and fundraisers.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Veteran Hollywood executive Tom Sherak has a new role: Los Angeles film czar. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti on Thursday appointed Sherak to be his senior film advisor and help stem the flow of production that has taken a toll on the city's signature film and television business. Sherak, the former president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, will lead Garcetti's efforts to make L.A. more film friendly and persuade state lawmakers to do more to support the state's entertainment industry, the mayor said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Hollywood's job market dimmed last month. After three consecutive months of year-over-year job gains, the entertainment industry posted a nearly 4% decline in jobs in May, state employment figures show. The motion picture and sound recording category -- which includes those working at the major studios, post-production houses and on film crews - accounted for 112,100 wage and salary jobs in May, down from 116,500 jobs a year earlier and 128,500 jobs in April. The figures are subject to revision and do not count those who work as freelancers or independent contractors.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2013 | By David G. Savage and Dawn Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court gave foreign buyers of books, video discs and other copyrighted works a right to resell them in the U.S. without permission of the copyright owner, giving discount retailers a victory and the entertainment industry a setback. The 6-3 decision Tuesday came in the case of Supap Kirtsaeng, a USC graduate student from Thailand who figured he could earn money for his education by buying low-cost textbooks in his native country and reselling them in the United States.
NEWS
December 9, 1997
Al Simms, 86, entertainment industry executive for 60 years. Born Al Ciminelli in Rochester, N.Y., as one of 17 children of Italian immigrants, Simms began his career as manager of the nationally broadcast "Horace Heidt Youth Opportunity Show." He later worked with singer Frankie Laine. For 28 years, Simms was associated with American International Pictures, working as director of the music department, head of personnel, general manager and assistant to the president.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1997
The Times' coverage of the Assembly Select Committee on Entertainment and the Arts ["Boom May Cost Hollywood," Dec. 16] missed the mark when it stated that "there is sentiment in Sacramento to view the healthy entertainment industry as a 'cash cow.' " The purpose of the committee hearing was to gather information about the economic impact of the film industry and determine if there are ways the state can foster industry growth. It's accurate that at one point the state parks department had apparently been considering imposing a fee on movies shot on state park property.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 2013 | By Rebecca Trounson, Los Angeles Times
Mark Saylor, a former Los Angeles Times editor who oversaw a Pulitzer Prize-winning series of articles on corruption in the entertainment industry, died Friday of cancer at his Pasadena home, his wife said. He was 58. Saylor, who was also a nationally ranked chess master, was diagnosed with inoperable brain cancer last spring, said his wife, Nora Zamichow, a former Times staff writer. In 1998, as entertainment editor for The Times' business section, Saylor worked with reporters Chuck Philips and Michael A. Hiltzik on three major projects over one year: fundraising by the Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences that netted only pennies for its charity; a resurgence of radio station "payola," or illicit payoffs, for airplay of new recordings; and the preponderance of untested luxury detox programs for wealthy celebrities.
OPINION
February 19, 2013 | Jonah Goldberg
"We need to buy a movie studio. " Amid the conferences, panels, meetings and informal conversations in the wake of the presidential election, this idea has been a near constant among conservatives who feel like the country is slipping through their fingers. Mitt Romney and the Republican National Committee combined raised just more than $1 billion, and all we got are these lousy T-shirts. Since conservatives are losing the culture, goes the argument, which in turn leads to losing at politics, maybe that money could be better spent on producing some cultural ammo of our own?
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