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Entertainment Industry Development Corp

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2000
Productions outside of studio lots rose 16% in January from a year earlier, according to the Entertainment Industry Development Corp. The agency, which oversees the issuing of permits for shooting in public throughout most of Los Angeles County, said the number of days spent filming movies, TV shows, music videos, commercials and other productions came to 2,444 in the month, up from 1,847 a year earlier.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 20, 2005 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
In a rare moment of unity, five rival film permit companies have joined together to accuse the Entertainment Industry Development Corp. of trying to drive them out of business. In a lawsuit filed late last week, the companies allege that the corporation, which is under contract to the city to coordinate permitting in Los Angeles, has treated them "in a discriminatory and unfair manner."
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BUSINESS
February 7, 1999
As a member of the entertainment industry and lifelong resident of Southern California, I am truly getting sick and tired of the Entertainment Industry Development Corp. hitting us with figures that don't really mean a thing to the men and women who work in the industry, as well as the residents of Southern California ["Drop in L.A. Film Shoots Reflects Industry Slowing," Jan. 23]. Let's face it: Films, movies made for TV, commercials, videos and anything else that has to do with shooting on the streets of L.A. County has left for cheaper and easier areas.
OPINION
November 17, 2003 | Marjorie Gellhorn Sa'adah
In my downtown neighborhood, a stretch of sidewalk is again blocked by a film crew. A security guard argues with a fast-walking pedestrian who ignores the moviemakers' orange cones. They argue until she turns in to a store displaying tiny mannequins dressed for their first Communion. The guard turns and swears. I am the next pedestrian in his path. But a huge hydraulic lift carrying a set-construction crew is in mine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1999 | AGNES DIGGS
The Zoo Commission should reconsider a proposal to charge a fee for commercial use of the facility, according to Mayor Richard Riordan. The Entertainment Industry Development Corp. expressed concern that the proposed $5,000 fee is excessive and might discourage the movie industry from filming at the Los Angeles Zoo. Zoo commissioners had on March 10 requested that the mayor's office approve the fee.
OPINION
November 3, 2002
Your Oct. 29 front-page article, "Film Agency's Chief Finds Himself in D.A. Spotlight," about Los Angeles' Entertainment Industry Development Corp., was a jaw-dropper. So the discredited head of the agency, Cody Cluff, wined and dined Hollywood bigwigs as if he, himself, were a film mogul! Until they caught up with him, Cluff had his cake and ate it too. However, he is not the first and will not be the last to let his proximity to show biz go to his head. The details of the agency's machinations and tossing of cash from the money tree that keeps the EIDC afloat are not unbelievable when you keep in mind that no one within the government of Los Angeles kept an eye on it and how it was operating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1997
Re "Battle Scenes" (April 2) and homeowner Veda Weisman's self-righteous anger over her neighborhood's invasion by a film crew: Does Weisman go to the movies? Does she watch television, videos? How are these entertainments to be created? Is Weisman enjoying the benefits of Los Angeles' strong economic base, due in no small part to the thriving entertainment business? Even if the answer to all of these questions is no, the fact that she disrupted filming with her house alarm until she was paid $200 a day invalidates her points of principle--it's less the act of an indignant homeowner who has the avenue of city government to resolve her issues, and more shows the colors of an opportunist.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2002
On behalf of film technicians everywhere, let me apologize to Jim Bosche and to the many other Los Angeles residents who get routinely disturbed by our work (Letters, May 26). When working, we try to keep in mind that wherever we film, we will undoubtedly disturb (and often upset) residents who live near our sets. We try to keep that to a minimum, but it happens. That's not our goal, it's just a byproduct of making movies and television shows. I am forever amazed, however, that residents of L.A. routinely complain about film production.
OPINION
November 17, 2003 | Marjorie Gellhorn Sa'adah
In my downtown neighborhood, a stretch of sidewalk is again blocked by a film crew. A security guard argues with a fast-walking pedestrian who ignores the moviemakers' orange cones. They argue until she turns in to a store displaying tiny mannequins dressed for their first Communion. The guard turns and swears. I am the next pedestrian in his path. But a huge hydraulic lift carrying a set-construction crew is in mine.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1999 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Underscoring the cooling-off of Southern California's entertainment economy, shooting on the streets of Los Angeles dipped sharply last year as tighter spending sliced into film, TV and commercial production. The numbers released Friday by Entertainment Industry Development Corp., which issues permits for about 80% of the shooting done in Los Angeles County, show an overall drop of 4% in production days, or days spent shooting in areas of Los Angeles outside of sound stages.
OPINION
November 3, 2002
Your Oct. 29 front-page article, "Film Agency's Chief Finds Himself in D.A. Spotlight," about Los Angeles' Entertainment Industry Development Corp., was a jaw-dropper. So the discredited head of the agency, Cody Cluff, wined and dined Hollywood bigwigs as if he, himself, were a film mogul! Until they caught up with him, Cluff had his cake and ate it too. However, he is not the first and will not be the last to let his proximity to show biz go to his head. The details of the agency's machinations and tossing of cash from the money tree that keeps the EIDC afloat are not unbelievable when you keep in mind that no one within the government of Los Angeles kept an eye on it and how it was operating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2002 | PATRICK MCGREEVY, ANITA M. BUSCH and NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Alarmed by a criminal probe of the quasi-public agency that provides city and county film permits, the Los Angeles City Council took emergency action Tuesday to review possible reforms of the Entertainment Industry Development Corp., including whether council members should continue to automatically serve on the agency's board. At the same time, the county Board of Supervisors--whose five members also sit on the EIDC board--directed staff members to look into its relationship with the agency.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2002
On behalf of film technicians everywhere, let me apologize to Jim Bosche and to the many other Los Angeles residents who get routinely disturbed by our work (Letters, May 26). When working, we try to keep in mind that wherever we film, we will undoubtedly disturb (and often upset) residents who live near our sets. We try to keep that to a minimum, but it happens. That's not our goal, it's just a byproduct of making movies and television shows. I am forever amazed, however, that residents of L.A. routinely complain about film production.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2000
Productions outside of studio lots rose 16% in January from a year earlier, according to the Entertainment Industry Development Corp. The agency, which oversees the issuing of permits for shooting in public throughout most of Los Angeles County, said the number of days spent filming movies, TV shows, music videos, commercials and other productions came to 2,444 in the month, up from 1,847 a year earlier.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Hollywood is fretting about a downturn in production and the flight of jobs to cheaper markets such as Canada and Australia, a certain niche of the entertainment world is quietly flourishing: porn. This summer, grips, gaffers and best boys of mainstream movie-making are marching down Hollywood Boulevard in an effort to save their jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1999 | AGNES DIGGS
The Zoo Commission should reconsider a proposal to charge a fee for commercial use of the facility, according to Mayor Richard Riordan. The Entertainment Industry Development Corp. expressed concern that the proposed $5,000 fee is excessive and might discourage the movie industry from filming at the Los Angeles Zoo. Zoo commissioners had on March 10 requested that the mayor's office approve the fee.
NEWS
September 1, 1999 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Hollywood is fretting about a downturn in production and the flight of jobs to cheaper markets such as Canada and Australia, a certain niche of the entertainment world is quietly flourishing: porn. This summer, grips, gaffers and best boys of mainstream movie-making are marching down Hollywood Boulevard in an effort to save their jobs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1997 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's not exactly the War of the Roses, but in Veda Weisman's eyes it's no less a battle for the heart and soul of her once-serene little corner of Pacific Palisades. For the last two weeks, Weisman and a handful of residents have waged a sometimes covert war of wills against perhaps the most imposing army any neighborhood could face: one with huge trucks, endless scores of soldiers, commanders in fancy hats and enough money to operate the most sophisticated of battle machines.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1999
As a member of the entertainment industry and lifelong resident of Southern California, I am truly getting sick and tired of the Entertainment Industry Development Corp. hitting us with figures that don't really mean a thing to the men and women who work in the industry, as well as the residents of Southern California ["Drop in L.A. Film Shoots Reflects Industry Slowing," Jan. 23]. Let's face it: Films, movies made for TV, commercials, videos and anything else that has to do with shooting on the streets of L.A. County has left for cheaper and easier areas.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1999 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Underscoring the cooling-off of Southern California's entertainment economy, shooting on the streets of Los Angeles dipped sharply last year as tighter spending sliced into film, TV and commercial production. The numbers released Friday by Entertainment Industry Development Corp., which issues permits for about 80% of the shooting done in Los Angeles County, show an overall drop of 4% in production days, or days spent shooting in areas of Los Angeles outside of sound stages.
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