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BUSINESS
November 25, 2000 | ANTHONY KUHN and TYLER MARSHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Tower Records on the Great Wall? The Forbidden City Virgin Megastore? HMV in the PRC? While such fantasy scenarios are still a long way off, China's imminent accession to the World Trade Organization has U.S. companies preparing to move into one of the last areas of China's potentially lucrative entertainment market still off-limits to foreigners: distribution of music and videos.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2012 | By Scott Collins, Los Angeles Times
Keith Olbermann isn't mincing words in his $70-million lawsuit against Current TV. Dumped last week by the upstart cable network, Olbermann let loose a verbal barrage against co-founders Al Gore and Joel Hyatt in a 43-page legal complaint for breach of contract filed Thursday in Los Angeles County Superior Court, accusing them of blackmail and calling them "dilettantes portraying entertainment industry executives. " The lawsuit sets the stage for a high-profile legal battle between two leaders of American liberalism: Gore, a former U.S. vice president and Nobel laureate, and Olbermann, a fiery talk-show host.
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BUSINESS
September 25, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite record spending for movie scripts and recording contracts and the global boom in entertainment vehicles such as videocassettes, compact discs and syndicated television, getting a job in Hollywood is harder than ever. It isn't a matter of fewer jobs. It's tougher competition. "While film and TV production is near an all-time high, we also have a talent pool that is at an all-time high," said Mark Locher, national communications director at the Screen Actors Guild.
SPORTS
February 6, 2007 | Jerry Crowe, Times Staff Writer
Nancy Spears, a former entertainment industry executive, is the new president of the Sparks -- the result of a nationwide search that may have been superfluous. Spears, whose appointment will be announced today by the WNBA team, is a recreation-league teammate of Sparks co-owner Carla Christofferson, who piqued her teammate's interest on a court last month at the Ketchum-Downtown YMCA. Spears, who joins the Sparks from Warner Bros.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It didn't take long for former Warner Music U.S. chief Doug Morris to land a new job. A few hours after Time Warner fired Morris on June 21, the 56-year-old industry veteran got a call from Seagram Chief Executive Edgar Bronfman Jr., who offered a deal to run a multimillion-dollar joint-venture label at MCA Music Entertainment. MCA Music Chairman Al Teller announced the pact with Morris on Monday, shortly after news broke that Bronfman had hired former CAA President Ron Meyer to run MCA Inc.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1995 | JAMES BATES
As Seagram Co. Chief Executive Edgar Bronfman Jr. installs new management at MCA Inc. and continues to cut deals, it's becoming clear to a good number of Hollywood executives that he may have a role model in mind: the late Time Warner Chairman Steven J. Ross. No one is quite saying that Bronfman is destined to fill the giant void in entertainment business left by the 1992 death of the charismatic Ross, who lavished attention on stars and who gained a remarkable degree of loyalty from them.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN and SALLIE HOFMEISTER
MCA/Universal Seagram Co. acquired 80% of MCA last month. On Monday Seagram Chief Executive Edgar Bronfman Jr. formally tapped Ron Meyer, a co-founder of Creative Artists Agency, as president and chief operating officer of MCA after failing to come to terms with Meyer's boss, Michael Ovitz. MCA Chairman Lew Wasserman will become chairman emeritus, while Meyer assumes the role held by longtime MCA president Sidney Sheinberg.
NEWS
December 9, 1997
Al Simms, 86, entertainment industry executive for 60 years. Born Al Ciminelli in Rochester, N.Y., as one of 17 children of Italian immigrants, Simms began his career as manager of the nationally broadcast "Horace Heidt Youth Opportunity Show." He later worked with singer Frankie Laine. For 28 years, Simms was associated with American International Pictures, working as director of the music department, head of personnel, general manager and assistant to the president.
SPORTS
February 6, 2007 | Jerry Crowe, Times Staff Writer
Nancy Spears, a former entertainment industry executive, is the new president of the Sparks -- the result of a nationwide search that may have been superfluous. Spears, whose appointment will be announced today by the WNBA team, is a recreation-league teammate of Sparks co-owner Carla Christofferson, who piqued her teammate's interest on a court last month at the Ketchum-Downtown YMCA. Spears, who joins the Sparks from Warner Bros.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2012 | By Scott Collins, Los Angeles Times
Keith Olbermann isn't mincing words in his $70-million lawsuit against Current TV. Dumped last week by the upstart cable network, Olbermann let loose a verbal barrage against co-founders Al Gore and Joel Hyatt in a 43-page legal complaint for breach of contract filed Thursday in Los Angeles County Superior Court, accusing them of blackmail and calling them "dilettantes portraying entertainment industry executives. " The lawsuit sets the stage for a high-profile legal battle between two leaders of American liberalism: Gore, a former U.S. vice president and Nobel laureate, and Olbermann, a fiery talk-show host.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2000 | ANTHONY KUHN and TYLER MARSHALL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Tower Records on the Great Wall? The Forbidden City Virgin Megastore? HMV in the PRC? While such fantasy scenarios are still a long way off, China's imminent accession to the World Trade Organization has U.S. companies preparing to move into one of the last areas of China's potentially lucrative entertainment market still off-limits to foreigners: distribution of music and videos.
NEWS
December 9, 1997
Al Simms, 86, entertainment industry executive for 60 years. Born Al Ciminelli in Rochester, N.Y., as one of 17 children of Italian immigrants, Simms began his career as manager of the nationally broadcast "Horace Heidt Youth Opportunity Show." He later worked with singer Frankie Laine. For 28 years, Simms was associated with American International Pictures, working as director of the music department, head of personnel, general manager and assistant to the president.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It didn't take long for former Warner Music U.S. chief Doug Morris to land a new job. A few hours after Time Warner fired Morris on June 21, the 56-year-old industry veteran got a call from Seagram Chief Executive Edgar Bronfman Jr., who offered a deal to run a multimillion-dollar joint-venture label at MCA Music Entertainment. MCA Music Chairman Al Teller announced the pact with Morris on Monday, shortly after news broke that Bronfman had hired former CAA President Ron Meyer to run MCA Inc.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1995 | JAMES BATES
As Seagram Co. Chief Executive Edgar Bronfman Jr. installs new management at MCA Inc. and continues to cut deals, it's becoming clear to a good number of Hollywood executives that he may have a role model in mind: the late Time Warner Chairman Steven J. Ross. No one is quite saying that Bronfman is destined to fill the giant void in entertainment business left by the 1992 death of the charismatic Ross, who lavished attention on stars and who gained a remarkable degree of loyalty from them.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN and SALLIE HOFMEISTER
MCA/Universal Seagram Co. acquired 80% of MCA last month. On Monday Seagram Chief Executive Edgar Bronfman Jr. formally tapped Ron Meyer, a co-founder of Creative Artists Agency, as president and chief operating officer of MCA after failing to come to terms with Meyer's boss, Michael Ovitz. MCA Chairman Lew Wasserman will become chairman emeritus, while Meyer assumes the role held by longtime MCA president Sidney Sheinberg.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite record spending for movie scripts and recording contracts and the global boom in entertainment vehicles such as videocassettes, compact discs and syndicated television, getting a job in Hollywood is harder than ever. It isn't a matter of fewer jobs. It's tougher competition. "While film and TV production is near an all-time high, we also have a talent pool that is at an all-time high," said Mark Locher, national communications director at the Screen Actors Guild.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1992 | RAY LOYND, Ray Loynd writes regularly about theater for Calendar.
She was the quintessential golden girl--the princess high in the tower. When her knight swept her into the Jazz Age and the Roaring '20s, the flapper came of age and a legend was born. Then the dream shattered, and it all crashed to the floor like a platter of trays, ending with madness in a North Carolina sanitarium. The story is told in "Zelda: The Last Flapper," starring Kathleen Garrett in a one-woman show at the Tiffany Theatre on the Sunset Strip.
BUSINESS
August 17, 2010 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski and Jessica Guynn, Los Angeles Times
Google revolutionized the way people access information. Now it wants to transform how people get entertainment. The search giant is touting an ambitious new technology, called Google TV, that would marry the Internet with traditional television, enabling viewers to watch TV shows and movies unshackled from the broadcast networks or cable channels on which they air. Users would need to buy a TV or set-top box with Google software that could connect...
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