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NEWS
May 1, 2001 | JAMES BATES and CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Hollywood holds its breath over the possibility of a writers strike, ongoing internal struggles within the writers and actors guilds and at the studios are making this year's negotiations the most complex ever. Within both unions and the handful of giant media conglomerates that control the entertainment industry, sharply divergent agendas are making it more difficult to reach consensus in negotiating contracts.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1991 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Los Angeles' attempt to plug a $13-million hole in next year's budget is pitting two politically savvy and well-financed industries against each other in one of the most intense City Hall lobbying campaigns in years. Entertainment industry officials and cable television operators are going head to head to see which--if either--will be hit with taxes needed to shore up Los Angeles' sagging finances.
NEWS
July 26, 1989 | JEFFREY L. RABIN, Times Staff Writer
When the Supreme Court decided early this month to uphold a Missouri law restricting abortion, and implicitly invited other states to enact abortion curbs, it sent pro-choice and anti-abortion groups scrambling to raise money, recruit volunteers and plan strategy for the coming showdowns in state capitols across the nation. How the two sides are doing so highlights some fundamental differences between them.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1997 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood occasionally contributes to its own image problems, presenting fictional portraits in movies such as "The Player" and "Swimming With Sharks" that feed perceptions that the place can't be found with a moral compass. Recently, such depictions have begun to emanate from the small screen, such as last season's Hollywood-murder plot in the ABC drama "Murder One" and now NBC's "Law & Order," with a three-episode story being showcased in "ER's" time slot.
NEWS
June 19, 1995 | JOHN M. BRODER and DWIGHT MORRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) unleashed his recent attack on Hollywood, President Clinton hastened to proclaim his own credentials as a spokesman for American virtue against the depredations of the entertainment industry. The White House quickly released a five-page summary of Clinton's comments on Hollywood and violence as part of its "me too" effort. But the President's remarks have significantly less edge than Dole's--and with good reason.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1990 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lamenting Hollywood's loss of billions of dollars and thousands of entertainment industry jobs to other cities and regions, Los Angeles Councilman Michael Woo called Thursday for city officials to develop ways to give the film and television companies more favorable treatment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1992 | TERRY PRISTIN and DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Art may offer solace in times of crisis, but in Los Angeles last weekend, people had to find comfort elsewhere. The unprecedented citywide curfew forced the cancellation or postponement of virtually every live performance of music and theater, while movie theaters were mostly dark and museums and art galleries also shut their doors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1998 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fireworks and champagne marked the official start of construction Thursday on a closely watched Hollywood redevelopment project billed as the beginning of the district's long-awaited revival. About 800 people turned out for an event that bore little resemblance to a conventional groundbreaking ceremony.
BUSINESS
December 17, 1995 | JAMES FLANIGAN
In touting the extravagant blueprint for the $200-million DreamWorks Studios development at Playa Vista, Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan gushed at one point last week that the prospect of snagging this project "is more important than bringing an NFL team to L.A." He was being serious.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1992 | ALAN CITRON and JOHN LIPPMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Former Fox Inc. Chairman Barry Diller and Revlon owner Ronald O. Perelman have been regular lunch partners since the early 1980s, when the New York financier owned the Technicolor film lab. Heads turned, however, when the two recently showed up at the Grill in Beverly Hills. Perelman found himself cast as the backer du jour in Diller's next business venture--the nature of which is the subject of intense Hollywood interest.
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