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Entertainment Industry United States

BUSINESS
September 23, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Spurred by this summer's deal mania, entertainment companies are finding a growing need to seek merger partners or form strategic alliances--but there are fewer free-standing players left from which to choose a partner. What should Hollywood's other major players do? Here's a look at possible strategies for five of the biggest: Seagram Co.: The Canadian beverage company's $5.7-billion acquisition of 80% of MCA in June signaled the first of the summer's many mega-deals.
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BUSINESS
September 23, 1995 | TOM MULLIGAN
Time Warner Co. and Turner Broadcasting System Inc. announced their plans for a$7.5-billion merger Friday, but not everybody is happy. Three of the harshest critics are in the corporate arena. Here are snapshots of the dissidents and their reasons for opposing the mega-merger. US WEST INC. * Business: Provides local telephone service in states. In 1993, it paid $2.5 billion for a 25.5% stake in Time Warner Entertainment, a cable partnership controlled by Time Warner.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1995 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid mounting concern that the recent wave of media mergers will dangerously diminish competition in key segments of the communications industry, the Clinton Administration is considering a variety of tactics to slow the decade-long trend toward media consolidation. It's unclear whether any of the measures now being weighed would seriously threaten Walt Disney Co.'s proposed acquisition of Capital Cities / ABC Inc., Westinghouse Electric Corp.'s bid for CBS Inc., or Time Warner Inc.'
BUSINESS
September 13, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
Time Warner Inc. Chairman Gerald Levin is meeting with Turner Broadcasting System Inc.'s chief Ted Turner to hash out a final acquisition proposal to present to Turner's board Friday, according to two executives close to the negotiations. Levin, who last month proposed to buy Turner in a deal worth $8 billion or more, flew to Atlanta on Tuesday to continue negotiations that would create the world's largest media and entertainment company.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1995 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the select group of Wall Street institutions that hold big chunks of broadcast, cable and entertainment stocks are known as the "media mafia" because of the behind-the-scenes power they wield, then Gordon Crawford is the media don. "People used to say that Michael Ovitz was the most powerful man in Hollywood," said Raymond Katz, a managing director at Bear Stearns & Co., referring to the Hollywood super-agent and soon-to-be president of Walt Disney Co. "I always thought it was Gordy Crawford."
BUSINESS
September 5, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Time Warner Inc., working during the weekend to complete its proposed buyout package for Turner Broadcasting System Inc., is considering reshuffling top executives if the $8.5-billion stock deal goes through. Chairman Gerald M. Levin is said to be mulling one scenario in which Time Warner's music and Home Box Office chief Michael J. Fuchs would give up both positions to become chief operating officer of Turner Broadcasting.
BUSINESS
September 2, 1995 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As lawyers and investment bankers representing Time Warner Inc. and Turner Broadcasting System Inc. continued to negotiate a proposed $8.5-billion merger, some Wall Street analysts began questioning whether the entertainment giant's offer might be overpriced. No formal announcement of a merger is expected before next week, according to people close to the talks. Time Warner is proposing to exchange 0.75 shares of its stock for each share of Turner Broadcasting and to make Turner a subsidiary.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Can Time Warner Inc. and Turner Broadcasting System Inc. reap cost savings and synergies by combining? Maybe, analysts say, but they probably could do better with other partners.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1995 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A formal offer by Time Warner Inc. to buy Turner Broadcasting System Inc. for an estimated $8.5 billion in stock could be made early next week as key participants have reached agreement on the broad outlines of a deal, according to sources familiar with the talks. "There are a lot of [legal] papers to finish," said one source. "The share exchange is still being debated. But there's no reason to think the deal won't go through."
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