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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 2000 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hal Riddle waited seven years before a spot opened up at the Motion Picture & Television Fund's retirement home in Woodland Hills. But his efficiency cottage, the place he has called home for five years, was worth the wait. "No one is thrown out," said Riddle, 80, who lives alone and has no immediate family. "It's a feeling of security that goes a long way when you tend to be our age."
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BUSINESS
July 30, 1996 | JAMES BATES
Last year, it was "content is king" and "vertical integration." This year, it's "brands." The entertainment industry's leading buzzword of 1996 suggests that the entire business is undergoing a massive Procter & Gambleization. "Batman" and "Jurassic Park" aren't just movies. They are like Tide and Coca-Cola, global brands to be exploited. Sony Corp. President Nobuyuki Idei wants to make Sony not only a brand name in Walkmans, but in entertainment as well.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2003 | David Streitfeld, Times Staff Writer
Suzanne Lloyd has spent the last four years refurbishing her legacy: 26 films made by her grandfather, silent film star Harold Lloyd. She has spent millions on digitally restored prints and full orchestrations. Now, as a result of Wed- nesday's decision by the Supreme Court reaffirming the current copyright law, she knows two things: Her rights to these films are secure for two more decades. And she'll have greater success protecting those rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1995 | PATRICE APODACA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few cities have been as ridiculed, but these days Burbank can afford to laugh. The butt of jokes dating back to the '60s comedy show "Laugh-In" and perpetuated by Johnny Carson, Burbank was until recently a fitting target. It was hot, smoggy and, in some areas, downright ugly. Adding injury to insult, Burbank lost nearly 14,000 jobs after its biggest employer, Lockheed Corp., packed up and moved in 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1993 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Contrary to popular myth, great art does not always come from hunger. A thriving art scene is fueled by consumption, and consumption is fueled by money. Preferably, lots of it--as in Periclean Athens, Renaissance Florence and New York in the 1980s. Recessions, however, mean less money and less consumption; and Los Angeles, sadly, has been hard hit. But there's one place in Southern California where money, if it doesn't exactly flow, is still being made and spent.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight weeks ago, upon returning home from a Fourth of July weekend at the beach with his wife and daughter, actor Brad Davis pulled out a yellow legal pad and drafted a proposal for a book he never got the chance to write. "The purpose of this book is to reveal what it's like to be infected with HIV, to be receiving treatment, and having to remain anonymous at all costs--chronicling how I have done this for over six years," wrote Davis in spare and simple prose.
NEWS
February 4, 1989
Lee Stevens, who began as a mail clerk with the giant William Morris Agency and three decades later became the talent group's sixth president, died Thursday night of cancer at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. He was 58.
BUSINESS
April 13, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
The Federal Trade Commission gave Hollywood mixed ratings Thursday on shielding youngsters from images of death, destruction and other violent content. The agency noted positive changes since a landmark report seven years ago -- particularly by video game retailers, which have dramatically cut the availability of mature-rated games to undercover teen shoppers. But the FTC said the entertainment industry still had a long way to go.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1985 | LOIS TIMNICK, Times Staff Writer
A federal commission on pornography was familiar with sexually explicit materials, but members were not prepared for some of the testimony presented in a two-day hearing in Los Angeles this week. "I was not acutely aware of the severity of the sadomasochistic material being produced or of the commercial production of child pornography, which certainly appears to be more than just a cottage industry among pedophiles," commission member Deanne Tilton said.
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