Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEntertainment
IN THE NEWS

Entertainment

ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1990 | IRVIN KERSHNER, Kershner is the director of "RoboCop 2," "The Empire Strikes Back," "Loving," "The Luck of Ginger Coffey," "Return of a Man Called Horse" and "Up the Sandbox." and
Although we would like to believe that American filmmakers are totally free to make any kind of films they want, looking at this summer's lineup suggests something different. Where are the lyrical films, the love stories, the musicals? Where are the films that reflect the generosity and tolerance of America? As budgets rise so does an insidious form of de facto censorship, determining what is made and what is rejected.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
October 11, 1998 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a frenzy of optimism over the future of entertainment-based shopping, developers in North Orange County are planning an unprecedented blitz of new construction. No fewer than six new projects, totaling about 4 million square feet--almost twice the size of South Coast Plaza--are planned, underway or complete. By comparison, South County--which has hosted the bulk of the region's growth the last 10 years--is cranking out entertainment centers at only half that rate.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2004 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
The Federal Trade Commission gave entertainment companies a mixed report card Thursday in their efforts to shield children from violent movies, music and games. In an update to Congress, the commission credited studios, music labels and video game makers for better following self-imposed guidelines, including clamping down on the sale of R-rated movie tickets to underage teens and providing better rating information to parents.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1998 | MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At least once a month, Napoleon Alvarado makes the 20-minute drive from his family's house in Koreatown to Universal CityWalk. Although there are theaters closer to home, Alvarado said it's worth the drive and parking fee to spend a few hours at the big neon entertainment center next to Universal Studios. "We can walk around, look at things and we don't get bored waiting for the movie," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1985
Excellent Good Fair Poor Puccini: "Tosca." EMI/Angel. Many a "Tosca" has graced the catalogue in the past 30 years. Still none can equal the fire and finesse of this desert-island version, conducted by Victor de Sabata. Maria Callas, captured in her prime, conveys definitive electricity and pathos. No one in recent memory has matched the ardor of the young Giuseppe di Stefano as Cavaradossi, much less his ravishing pianissimo.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2009 | Steven Zeitchik
Roman Polanski may still be in Switzerland, but his movie will be coming to the U.S. The director, who is caught in legal limbo abroad, will see his new movie -- a thriller called "The Ghost Writer" -- released in the U.S. by Summit Entertainment, the studio behind the phenomenally successful "Twilight" franchise. The company plans on a quick turnaround, releasing the Polanski film sometime in the first half of 2010. "Ghost Writer" did not previously have a U.S. distributor. The embattled Polanski is currently living in his Swiss chalet after being released from jail on $4.5-million bail.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2004 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Microsoft Corp. wasn't able to do it solo, so now it's trying with a little help from some friends. The software colossus has brought a mob of allies to its fight to capture a big chunk of the growing digital entertainment market: hundreds of companies willing to provide software, gadgets, music and movies tailored to work in a Windows universe revolving around the personal computer.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fall season has begun and viewers around the country are tuning in to new shows, but this year not all of the programs are on television. Some of them are on the Internet. Kevin Tye, a technical recruiter for Hall Kinion in Seattle, watches videos on his computer at work for about an hour each day--though his viewing is spread out in small doses. One of his favorite programs on AtomFilms (http://www.atomfilms.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2011 | By Nate Jackson and Patrick Kevin Day, Los Angeles Times
In the world of pop culture, 2010 was a year of big, eye-catching numbers: More than 100 million people watched the Super Bowl in January, and, by year's end, a video game, Call of Duty: Black Ops, had done more than a billion dollars' worth of business ? a higher gross than many would-be Hollywood blockbusters. But understanding what those numbers tell us about the rapidly changing entertainment environment requires that we make some statistical comparisons that help explain what audiences were watching, listening to and buying last year.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|