Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEntertainment
IN THE NEWS

Entertainment

BUSINESS
October 11, 1998 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a frenzy of optimism over the future of entertainment-based shopping, developers in North Orange County are planning an unprecedented blitz of new construction. No fewer than six new projects, totaling about 4 million square feet--almost twice the size of South Coast Plaza--are planned, underway or complete. By comparison, South County--which has hosted the bulk of the region's growth the last 10 years--is cranking out entertainment centers at only half that rate.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
July 9, 2004 | Richard Verrier, Times Staff Writer
The Federal Trade Commission gave entertainment companies a mixed report card Thursday in their efforts to shield children from violent movies, music and games. In an update to Congress, the commission credited studios, music labels and video game makers for better following self-imposed guidelines, including clamping down on the sale of R-rated movie tickets to underage teens and providing better rating information to parents.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1998 | MELINDA FULMER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At least once a month, Napoleon Alvarado makes the 20-minute drive from his family's house in Koreatown to Universal CityWalk. Although there are theaters closer to home, Alvarado said it's worth the drive and parking fee to spend a few hours at the big neon entertainment center next to Universal Studios. "We can walk around, look at things and we don't get bored waiting for the movie," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1985
Excellent Good Fair Poor Puccini: "Tosca." EMI/Angel. Many a "Tosca" has graced the catalogue in the past 30 years. Still none can equal the fire and finesse of this desert-island version, conducted by Victor de Sabata. Maria Callas, captured in her prime, conveys definitive electricity and pathos. No one in recent memory has matched the ardor of the young Giuseppe di Stefano as Cavaradossi, much less his ravishing pianissimo.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2004 | Joseph Menn, Times Staff Writer
Microsoft Corp. wasn't able to do it solo, so now it's trying with a little help from some friends. The software colossus has brought a mob of allies to its fight to capture a big chunk of the growing digital entertainment market: hundreds of companies willing to provide software, gadgets, music and movies tailored to work in a Windows universe revolving around the personal computer.
BUSINESS
October 7, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fall season has begun and viewers around the country are tuning in to new shows, but this year not all of the programs are on television. Some of them are on the Internet. Kevin Tye, a technical recruiter for Hall Kinion in Seattle, watches videos on his computer at work for about an hour each day--though his viewing is spread out in small doses. One of his favorite programs on AtomFilms (http://www.atomfilms.
BUSINESS
February 12, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the opening scene of the short film "The Kiss," the camera slowly pans up the blacktop to reveal actor Bernard Zilinskas sunning himself bare-chested on the hood of his car. Buff young Zilinskas may have the lead role, but it was the car that got the film green-lighted. That's because the film was approved and financed by Ford Motor Co., and the car, not coincidentally, is a Ford Focus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2001 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whenever Debbie Dexter tells someone she's the lesbian president of a gay square dance club, she gets the look. A little smirk, a raised eyebrow--the facial giveaways of disbelief and a barely suppressed chuckle. "They kind of look at us and go, 'Huh?' " said Dexter, 40, president of the Golden State Squares in Santa Ana. "It is a bit of an oxymoron, isn't it?"
NEWS
January 31, 1998 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Jeffrey N. Rudolph, his expression as somber as his two-button gray worsted suit, pedaled a bicycle out along a high wire stretched 43 feet above the floor of the new $130-million California Science Center in Exposition Park. At midpoint in the void, Rudolph, the center's 42-year-old executive director, gingerly released the handlebars, extended his arms and grinned gleefully.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|