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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Richard Prokopy, 68, an entomologist who studied insects that destroy apple crops and helped develop a decoy designed to kill apple maggot flies without spraying pesticide, died May 14 of cardiopulmonary arrest in Greenfield, Mass. Prokopy, a professor of entomology at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, specialized in fruit tree insects -- specifically those that attack apple trees -- and ecological approaches to pest management.
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NEWS
August 21, 1998
Harry H. Shorey, 67, UC Riverside entomologist who combatted insects that threaten the state's agricultural crops. Born in Quincy, Mass., Shorey earned a bachelor's degree in entomology at the University of Massachusetts and his master's and doctorate at Cornell University. After post-doctoral research in Australia, Shorey joined the UC Riverside faculty. He spent the years from 1978 to 1985 operating his own greenhouse and nursery in Vashon, Wash.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Maynard J. Ramsay, 90, an entomologist and internationally recognized expert on exotic parasites, died March 20 at a nursing home in Silver Spring, Md. A specialist on a variety of insects, Ramsay was perhaps best known for his research on the potato parasite. In the 1940s, he helped trace the worm to infested flower fields in Germany that had been converted for potato growing during World War II. He worked as an economic entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 1941.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Thomas Eisner, who became known as the "father of chemical ecology" as a result of his pioneering studies of how insects use chemicals to mate, elude predators and capture prey, died March 25 at his home in Ithaca, N.Y. He was 81 and had Parkinson's disease. Eisner, who spent his entire professional life at Cornell University, combined the observational skills of Charles Darwin with an inquisitiveness that caused him to look far beyond superficial characteristics. At a 2000 celebration of Eisner's career, biochemist John Law of the University of Arizona said: "Thousands of people can look at the same plant or animal and see the same thing, and there is the one person, like Tom, who comes along and sees something different.
SCIENCE
July 2, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Science Now blog
As far as anyone knows for certain, brown widow spiders have only resided in Southern California for a decade or so -- the first in the region was spotted in Torrance in 2003. But a new survey conducted by California entomologists shows that the spider is now making itself quite comfortable in our neck of the woods.  In some Southern California habitats, including the outdoor areas around suburban houses, the brown widow far outnumbers its cousin the black widow - a California native long feared for its venomous bite.
NEWS
October 17, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Rust spent another busy day figuring out what new weapons to use, planning the latest combative strategies in the never-ending war. "It's a worldwide battle against the same destructive forces in Tokyo, Hong Kong, New York City and Southern California. Look at these reports--same thing in Bulgaria, Poland, East Germany," sighed Rust, shuffling through papers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1995 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While other gumshoes strap on their 9-millimeter pistols when called to a murder scene, Jim Webb packs his butterfly net. * Upon arrival, he may not even notice the shell casings, blood splotches or murder weapon and steps right over the corpse itself. "I'm not a real cadaver fan," Webb says. "I'm just interested in the bugs." The only forensic entomologist in Orange County, Webb is part biologist and part detective.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 17, 1991 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They were in his mouth, up his nose and dancing on his closed eyelids. They clung to his white hair in buzzing, black dreadlocks, and they caked over his feet until his sneakers looked hairy. "I'm not sure how many there are--no one had the nerve to take a census," entomologist Norman Gary said from an elevator-sized plexiglass chamber. "But it's between 200,000 and a million bees."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On his way to the Insect Fair, Roger Qualls got butterflies in his stomach. The Mahomet, Ill., man was driving a truckload of fearsome tarantulas, fighting scorpions and giant beetles toward Arcadia when the car ahead of him suddenly skidded on ice and began careening crazily toward him. "Believe me, my heart was in my throat," Qualls said. "All I could think about was my collection and how everything could break if that car slammed into me."
NEWS
September 10, 1995 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While other gumshoes strap on their 9-millimeter pistols when called to a murder scene, Jim Webb packs his butterfly net. Upon arrival, he might not even notice the shell casings, blood splotches or murder weapon, and might step right over the corpse itself. "I'm not a real cadaver fan," Webb said. "I'm just interested in the bugs." The only forensic entomologist in Orange County, Webb is part biologist and part detective.
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