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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1997 | JOHN COX, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
State entomologists have narrowed their investigation of mysterious stick-like insects that were distributed to schools in southeast Los Angeles County last fall. A week after receiving four of the bugs from a Walnut agricultural association, state experts announced Thursday that the so-called walking sticks are foreign to the United States, and must therefore be classified as minor pests. But the state remains stymied in its efforts to figure out what kind of bug it is.
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SCIENCE
September 13, 2013 | By Brad Balukjian
Max Ataka loves insects. All kinds, from the beetles on his T-shirt to the Anise swallowtail butterfly perched on the back of his hand. The 12-year-old loves the colors, the weird behaviors, the fact that he can actually handle them. "When I was a baby, my first insect was a grasshopper," he said, recalling the memory as if it were from a distant era. Max is the youngest member of the Lorquin Entomological Society, an organization of Southern Californians who prefer six legs to four (or two)
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NEWS
November 30, 1986 | DELTHIA RICKS, United Press International
Language, literature, religion and music have been so profoundly influenced by insects that a biologist is developing a new field of study strictly devoted to the cultural contributions of bugs. "Bugs frighten and fascinate people," said Charles Hogue of the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History. "Almost no aspect of our culture is untouched by these creatures."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2002 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
"There are many paths to the truth," Zakaria Erzinclioglu, Britain's leading forensic entomologist, was fond of saying. For Erzinclioglu, who helped solve more than 200 murders over the last quarter-century, the path to the truth was paved with flies and maggots. Erzinclioglu, whose application of insect biology to the investigation of crimes earned him an international reputation, died Sept. 26 of a heart attack in England, although his death was not immediately reported in the London press.
NEWS
October 17, 1990 | CHARLES HILLINGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Rust spent another busy day figuring out what new weapons to use, planning the latest combative strategies in the never-ending war. "It's a worldwide battle against the same destructive forces in Tokyo, Hong Kong, New York City and Southern California. Look at these reports--same thing in Bulgaria, Poland, East Germany," sighed Rust, shuffling through papers.
NEWS
September 9, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Not to offend, but this is about maggots and the good things they do. You see, maggots help solve crimes. To the faint of heart or weak of stomach, fear not. Graphic description is not the intent here. It is only to give the writhing, squishy larvae their due, for maggots, which evolve into the common fly, are one of the chief tools in a relatively new brand of sleuthing called forensic entomology. It is a field that is growing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1996 | SARAH A. KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ron Taylor didn't ask for fame then or now. The appearances on the Johnny Carson show, "To Tell the Truth" and the front-page headlines in the late '60s were not his idea. He was simply a researcher in the UC Irvine entomology department when his long and unusual Odyssey began with a Rotarian who wanted him to say a few words on any topic at a club luncheon. Searching for an interesting subject, Taylor latched onto a file he compiled in graduate school on eating bugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1990 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Call him the Ant Man of Altadena. Also the Wasp Man, Beetle Man and Fly Man. Just watch as Robert H. Crandall--head down, rear up, arms bent and tucked to his sides--crouches his medium-sized frame into the attack pose of a deer fly. "They can bite you but good," said Crandall, 75, whose fascination with insects and crawling things dates from his childhood--and an actual, memorable bite.
NEWS
October 27, 1991 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scribbled telephone message was brief, but it spoke volumes to San Diego insect expert David Faulkner. "Murder," it said, listing a Ventura County criminal investigator as the caller. "Has larvae preserved. Would like to talk to you about looking at them." Within days, Faulkner was investigating the murder of 34-year-old Jean Ellen Eubanks, an unemployed construction worker found dead under a pile of rocks north of Ojai.
NEWS
September 10, 1995 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While other gumshoes strap on their 9-millimeter pistols when called to a murder scene, Jim Webb packs his butterfly net. Upon arrival, he might not even notice the shell casings, blood splotches or murder weapon, and might step right over the corpse itself. "I'm not a real cadaver fan," Webb said. "I'm just interested in the bugs." The only forensic entomologist in Orange County, Webb is part biologist and part detective.
SCIENCE
September 7, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Brazilian dinosaur ants and Mafia-style gangs have a lot in common, according to British researchers. Both live in tight-knit groups with dominant leaders who use strong-arm tactics to control their opponents and give the "kiss of death" to rivals who challenge their authority, according to entomologist Francis Ratnieks of the University of Sheffield. Dinosaur ants, which can grow to 1.6 inches long, live in small colonies with only one breeding ant, known as the "mother ant."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 2001 | REBECCA COOK, ASSOCIATED PRESS
This is a story about a bug, a bird and a tree. The bug is a tiny caterpillar, the western spruce budworm, eating its way through eastern Washington forests. The tree is the Douglas fir, the budworm's favorite meal. The bird is the northern spotted owl, a federally protected species that frequents the same forests the budworms are devouring. Put them together and you get another story--a story about how hard it is to correct the damage when humans tamper with Mother Nature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As if closing the doors on a tomb full of scarabs, UC Riverside began sealing off a new high-tech bug lab Friday, the only such facility in California and a key weapon in a campaign to protect Western crops from pests and the world from disease-carrying insects. After offering the public a final glimpse of the $15-million, 28,000-square-foot insectary and quarantine, university officials will carefully shield it from the outside world--not for the sake of secrecy, but security.
NEWS
October 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
The latest wave of European immigrants to invade Missouri may upset some people, but scientists say European Hornets actually benefit the ecosystem. The European Hornet is the largest of the vespid wasps in North America, growing to 1.5 inches. Vespid wasps live in colonies. The European Hornet is the only wasp that is brown with yellow markings, says Richard Houseman, entomologist at the University of Missouri-Columbia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1999
Flowers in the desert go dormant for long periods of time, waiting for the rainy season to trigger the emergence of newly sprouted seeds. New evidence suggests that bees in the Chihuahuan Desert--which juts from northern Mexico into Arizona, New Mexico and Texas--do the same thing. Entomologist Bryan N. Danforth of Cornell University reports in the current Proceedings of the Royal Society of London that larvae of the bees can survive for several years in the soil.
NEWS
November 1, 1999 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They've been found as far north as Oxnard--where an unsuspecting landfill worker couldn't lift a utility box lid because their hive was so large, and as far south as San Diego--the random catch by a net-wielding entomologist near an elementary school.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1995 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While other gumshoes strap on their 9-millimeter pistols when called to a murder scene, Jim Webb packs his butterfly net. * Upon arrival, he may not even notice the shell casings, blood splotches or murder weapon and steps right over the corpse itself. "I'm not a real cadaver fan," Webb says. "I'm just interested in the bugs." The only forensic entomologist in Orange County, Webb is part biologist and part detective.
NEWS
November 13, 1989 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Professor Michael Rust is clearly a man accustomed to bugs. With extraordinary nonchalance one recent day, the scientist tapped on the shell of a 3-inch-long Madagascar cockroach clinging tenaciously to his finger. Rust was attempting a scientific demonstration--getting the wriggling pest to hiss. A curious if squeamish visitor was waiting expectantly in a corner some eight feet away, but the featured insect seemed in no mood to cooperate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1999 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A critter the size of a pinhead is wreaking havoc among Orange County's stately eucalyptus groves, leaving landscapers, homeowners and agriculture officials scurrying for a weapon against the stubborn invaders. "I've never seen anything like it," said Tony Plante, public works superintendent for Lake Forest, where the infestation by an insect called the redgum lerp psyllid is among the worst in the county. "And there's really not much we can do--our hands are tied."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1999 | ELEANOR YANG and DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After years of lurid warnings, the news comes almost as an anticlimax: So-called killer bees have finally been sighted in Orange County, agriculture officials said Tuesday. Properly known as Africanized honeybees, the Brazilian-bred insect has been infiltrating the region for years and is becoming well established in surrounding counties.
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