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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1992
The new congressional entrance exam: Applicants must demonstrate proven skills in both draft and overdraft dodging. Balanced patriots need not apply! FREDRIC STRAHL, Granada Hills
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
The College Board's decision to make the essay portion of its influential SAT exam optional is setting off a national debate among colleges and universities about whether to require applicants to take it. Beyond the potential effect on students, the March 5 announcement about the upcoming test change is stirring soul-searching about the importance of writing in higher education and how best to evaluate that ability. The new College Board policy also has raised concerns about setting up a possible barrier to college entrance, especially if the separate essay writing exam requires an additional fee. Many colleges will face a serious problem in considering whether to keep mandating the essay test after the change goes into effect in 2016, said Jerome Lucido, executive director of the USC Center for Enrollment Research, Policy, and Practice, a national think tank on college admissions issues.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1995
School officials have changed the entrance exam for prestigious Gretchen Whitney High School in Cerritos because of concerns in recent years that some students had seen test questions early. Each January, multiple choice exams are administered to about 1,500 sixth-graders in the ABC Unified School District to determine their academic skill levels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 2014 | By Ari Bloomekatz
Join Times staff writer Larry Gordon for an L.A. Now Live online chat at 12:30 p.m. on  the major overhaul coming to the SAT college entrance exam.  Starting in 2016, students will no longer be required to write an essay and will not be penalized for wrong answers. However, they will no longer be allowed to use calculators as much as they want. About 1.7 million high school students take the test each year and The College Board's announcement Wednesday sent ripples through education communities across the nation.
SPORTS
October 29, 1994 | ELLIOTT ALMOND and EARL GUSTKEY
Delon Washington, the USC freshman tailback whose college entrance exam score was challenged last month, is expected to retake the test within a week. Washington, who gained 109 yards in the Trojans' season-opening 24-17 victory over Washington, was given time to prepare before retaking the American College Testing (ACT) exam, a source said. Washington's score was challenged by the ACT because of an unusual increase between his first and second test scores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 2001 | MASSIE RITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Melissa Raffalow furiously highlights a sheet of vocabulary builders in anxious streams of yellow. Sitting in a small Sherman Oaks classroom, she presses hard on her clipboard and writes "STUDY" on the page of Latinate words, underlining it. The man who handed the word list to Melissa and 14 other students on a recent afternoon ticks off the tricks that he says will help them get into a good school. If you don't know an answer, guess, Guy Strickland advises the class.
SPORTS
May 1, 1991 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every year, hundreds of thousands of high school seniors go through a rite of passage by taking the Scholastic Aptitude Test or the American College Test exams to gain admission into the college or university of their choice. The vast majority of students pass without a hitch and go on to collegiate life. But two groups seem to come to the public's attention: the students who ace the tests and the athletes who fail to meet minimum requirements.
WORLD
September 10, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
KOTA, India - The fourth of seven children of illiterate parents, Mohammad Ahmad grew up on his family's two-acre farm with barely enough to eat. Now that farm, which supports two dozen people in his extended family, is being used as collateral for a chance to score big here in India's cram school capital. For up to 19 hours a day, seven days a week, the 17-year-old studies, attends classes and takes mock tests, preparing for India's ultra-competitive engineering entrance exam. In this second-tier city of dusty storefronts and belching rickshaws, Ahmad and the tens of thousands of other students embody a nation's hunger for upward mobility, social respect and a role in the new India.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
The College Board's decision to make the essay portion of its influential SAT exam optional is setting off a national debate among colleges and universities about whether to require applicants to take it. Beyond the potential effect on students, the March 5 announcement about the upcoming test change is stirring soul-searching about the importance of writing in higher education and how best to evaluate that ability. The new College Board policy also has raised concerns about setting up a possible barrier to college entrance, especially if the separate essay writing exam requires an additional fee. Many colleges will face a serious problem in considering whether to keep mandating the essay test after the change goes into effect in 2016, said Jerome Lucido, executive director of the USC Center for Enrollment Research, Policy, and Practice, a national think tank on college admissions issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2001
If it's reasonable to require high school seniors to pass an exit exam, isn't it reasonable to require eighth-graders to pass an entrance exam? JAY CROSBY Oxnard
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
In a major overhaul of the SAT college entrance exam, students starting in 2016 will no longer be required to write an essay, will not be penalized for wrong answers and will not be able to freely use calculators. The College Board announcement Wednesday shook up a test that is taken by about 1.7 million high school students annually and, though its influence has been waning, remains a major factor in college admission decisions nationally. The shifts, officials said, are part of an effort to better align the 88-year-old exam with what students learn in high school and to get away from any advantages they may gain from expensive private tutoring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2014 | By Larry Gordon
As part of a major overhaul of the SAT college entrance exam, test-takers starting in 2016 will no longer be required to write an essay, the College Board announced Wednesday. However, an essay-writing test still will be offered, and many colleges may demand that applicants take it and submit the score. With that change, the main SAT will be condensed to two sections from the current three, and the top possible score will be 1,600, as it was for many decades. The current 2,400-point maximum was introduced with the start of the required essay seven years ago. The new optional essay test will be graded separately on a scale that is still under consideration, said officials of the College Board, which owns the widely used exam.
SPORTS
March 16, 2013 | T.J. Simers
TEMPE, Ariz. -- He remembers what he ordered: a chicken wrap. They were together at a Cheesecake Factory. He was 18 and on his night off from setting tables and serving food at the local country club. It was his first date with the woman who would become his wife. He says he already knew that. "Our first kiss was in the elevator," Albert Pujols says with a grin, and the big slugger isn't so intimidating right now. She spoke English and he spoke Spanish, making it interesting when she tried to find just the right words to tell him she had a three-month-old baby at home with Down syndrome.
WORLD
September 10, 2012 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
KOTA, India - The fourth of seven children of illiterate parents, Mohammad Ahmad grew up on his family's two-acre farm with barely enough to eat. Now that farm, which supports two dozen people in his extended family, is being used as collateral for a chance to score big here in India's cram school capital. For up to 19 hours a day, seven days a week, the 17-year-old studies, attends classes and takes mock tests, preparing for India's ultra-competitive engineering entrance exam. In this second-tier city of dusty storefronts and belching rickshaws, Ahmad and the tens of thousands of other students embody a nation's hunger for upward mobility, social respect and a role in the new India.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2008 | Mitchell Landsberg
Talk about worlds colliding: Imagine what would happen if a Hollywood comedy writer started thinking up questions for the SAT. Silly thought, right? Well, try these: 1. At a Saks Fifth Avenue store, Winona Ryder examines four distinct blouses, five distinct dresses and two distinct handbags. How many different combinations of items can she shoplift if she takes exactly one blouse, two dresses and a handbag? 2. Yo mamma so _______, when you mail her a letter, you need two ZIP Codes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2007 | Carla Rivera, Times Staff Writer
On a recent Sunday morning, a determined Spencer Cutrow spent three hours hunched over an admission exam designed to test his reading, math and reasoning skills, with its outcome likely to help determine how he will spend the rest of his academic career. But Spencer, 10, is anticipating middle school, not college.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1993
See if I have this right now. I'm supposed to vote for giving a subsidy (the voucher plan) to parents who can afford a $10,800 tuition to Harvard-Westlake (with two entrance requirements: an academic entrance exam and financial ability) and reduce the amount of money available to the public schools (with no entrance exam). And this is under the guise of free enterprise. Rigghhtt! JAMES H. BURR Tujunga
SPORTS
February 4, 1996 | Mike Downey
Downey's California: --I have been busy trying to think up a name for our new National Football League franchise, now that bossman Ken Behring of the Team Formerly Known As Seahawks has decided to let Seattle hang onto its name, logo and uniforms. This means Seattle can keep that angry-bird emblem that looks like the gargoyle on top of the Chrysler Building in New York. It also means Los Angeles can dump the name Seahawks, which makes me really sad, because I had a pet seahawk as a boy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2005 | Jean Merl, Times Staff Writer
The nation's high school class of 2005 posted a record-high score on the math portion of the SAT, but displayed a lack of progress on the verbal part of the widely used college-entrance examination, test officials said Tuesday. As a whole, students who graduated this spring and were entering college this fall averaged 520 on the math portion and 508 on the verbal, on a scale from 200 to 800 possible points per section. The math was up two points from the year before and the verbal was the same.
SPORTS
December 19, 2004 | Pete Thomas, Times Staff Writer
Junior Taylor remembers the play well: a basic reverse, on which he took the ball running to his right, then cut sharply to his left as the defense was shifting. He split two defenders and dashed 49 yards to the end zone. The touchdown gave UCLA a 7-0 lead and the Bruins defeated Colorado State, 30-19. It was the 2002 season opener and Taylor's first carry. But the play remains fresh in his mind for another reason: It was a moment he thought might never come.
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