Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEntrepreneurs Hispanics
IN THE NEWS

Entrepreneurs Hispanics

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
July 11, 1996 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The number of Latino-owned businesses soared 76% between 1987 and 1992, and their sales receipts rose 134%, far outstripping the general growth in U.S. business, the Census Bureau reported Wednesday. Latino-owned firms, which are moving rapidly beyond small "mom and pop"' enterprises into a wide variety of sophisticated ventures, now account for 4.5% of all U.S. businesses, and generate 2.2% of gross receipts. California was the leading state for Latino entrepreneurs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
July 11, 1996 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The number of Latino-owned businesses soared 76% between 1987 and 1992, and their sales receipts rose 134%, far outstripping the general growth in U.S. business, the Census Bureau reported Wednesday. Latino-owned firms, which are moving rapidly beyond small "mom and pop"' enterprises into a wide variety of sophisticated ventures, now account for 4.5% of all U.S. businesses, and generate 2.2% of gross receipts. California was the leading state for Latino entrepreneurs.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
July 11, 1996 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The number of Latino-owned businesses soared 76% between 1987 and 1992, and their sales receipts rose 134%, far outstripping the general growth in U.S. business, the Census Bureau reported Wednesday. Latino-owned firms, which are moving rapidly beyond small mom-and-pop enterprises into a wide variety of sophisticated ventures, now account for 4.5% of all U.S. businesses and generate 2.2% of gross receipts. California was the leading state for Latino entrepreneurs.
BUSINESS
July 11, 1996 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The number of Latino-owned businesses soared 76% between 1987 and 1992, and their sales receipts rose 134%, far outstripping the general growth in U.S. business, the Census Bureau reported Wednesday. Latino-owned firms, which are moving rapidly beyond small mom-and-pop enterprises into a wide variety of sophisticated ventures, now account for 4.5% of all U.S. businesses and generate 2.2% of gross receipts. California was the leading state for Latino entrepreneurs.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|