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NEWS
January 24, 1997 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Endangered species are so concentrated in Southern California and a few other hot spots that conservation efforts should be targeted there to help stem the country's loss of biodiversity, researchers will report today. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt, in an article that accompanied the report in the journal Science, said the new data will help revise federal policies to save animals and plants at risk of extinction.
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BUSINESS
July 23, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- California ranks sixth among the top 12 states in per-capita installations of solar electric energy generators, according to a just-released report by an advocacy group. "Lighting the Way," the study by the Environment America Research and Policy Center, names California as a leader among the 50 states, along with Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina and Vermont. "The sky's the limit on solar energy," said Michelle Kinman, clean energy advocate for Environment California, one of the group's 29 state affiliates.
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NEWS
November 9, 1996 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Most varieties of oil-based house paint will be phased out in the Los Angeles region under an environmental mandate adopted Friday by the South Coast Air Quality Management District board. The new regulation--which applies to Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties--means that the flat-finish paints used on most homes and businesses must, beginning in 2001, be 60% lower in solvents than is allowable today.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt
At least 10 times a day Andrew Kin clicks onto the Internet for the pure joy of watching his electricity meter run backward. The 30-year-old business consultant placed an array of rooftop solar panels on his Westwood duplex last fall, and thanks to a website provided by his installer he has watched his monthly electricity bills drop, in real time, from $50 to about $10. "I make up a little chart every day," Kin said. "This past week was sunny, so I was electricity neutral about every other day, which I'm excited about."
OPINION
March 6, 2009
Re "Villaraigosa reelected; Greuel leads," March 4 Wow. I guess Los Angeles has already given up on change and hope. What a resounding endorsement of waste and substandard performance. All the children currently getting Ds in the schools the mayor so arrogantly tried to expropriate should be encouraged to see how poorly one can do and still be a success. Good news, kids: The lowering of the bar is acceptable -- and voter-approved. Edward Bowers Sherman Oaks -- Re "Solar energy plan still trails," March 5 Despite Measure B's possible defeat, public support for solar power is waxing, not waning.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO -- California ranks sixth among the top 12 states in per-capita installations of solar electric energy generators, according to a just-released report by an advocacy group. "Lighting the Way," the study by the Environment America Research and Policy Center, names California as a leader among the 50 states, along with Arizona, Colorado, Delaware, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina and Vermont. "The sky's the limit on solar energy," said Michelle Kinman, clean energy advocate for Environment California, one of the group's 29 state affiliates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2009 | Margot Roosevelt
It is far from the "million solar roofs" that Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger touted, but the number of rooftop solar installations in California has grown from an estimated 500 a decade ago to nearly 50,000 today. And in the last three years, the Golden State's solar market has more than doubled.
NEWS
March 11, 1998 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the most expansive efforts ever to preserve California's precious--but threatened--open space, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation will give $175 million to protect the state's wildlife habitat, watersheds and spectacular vistas. The foundation has targeted the Central Coast, Central Valley and Sierra Nevada for a five-year effort to preserve about 250,000 acres through the purchase of water and development rights and in some instances land.
NEWS
November 2, 1998 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is California as America knows it. Sun-dappled hills of golden grasses undulate into the distance, dotted with herbs and occasional wildflowers. It is the kind of landscape made famous in old Western films, when the cowboys galloped their horses through the chaparral. Now here's the real story of this wild-land vista: Most of the rippling gold grasses came from Spain, Italy, Greece, Morocco. That thick patch of pale green fennel is an insidious intruder from Southern Europe.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt
At least 10 times a day Andrew Kin clicks onto the Internet for the pure joy of watching his electricity meter run backward. The 30-year-old business consultant placed an array of rooftop solar panels on his Westwood duplex last fall, and thanks to a website provided by his installer he has watched his monthly electricity bills drop, in real time, from $50 to about $10. "I make up a little chart every day," Kin said. "This past week was sunny, so I was electricity neutral about every other day, which I'm excited about."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2009 | Margot Roosevelt
It is far from the "million solar roofs" that Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger touted, but the number of rooftop solar installations in California has grown from an estimated 500 a decade ago to nearly 50,000 today. And in the last three years, the Golden State's solar market has more than doubled.
OPINION
March 6, 2009
Re "Villaraigosa reelected; Greuel leads," March 4 Wow. I guess Los Angeles has already given up on change and hope. What a resounding endorsement of waste and substandard performance. All the children currently getting Ds in the schools the mayor so arrogantly tried to expropriate should be encouraged to see how poorly one can do and still be a success. Good news, kids: The lowering of the bar is acceptable -- and voter-approved. Edward Bowers Sherman Oaks -- Re "Solar energy plan still trails," March 5 Despite Measure B's possible defeat, public support for solar power is waxing, not waning.
NEWS
May 15, 2002 | GARY POLAKOVIC and MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A loophole that allowed California farms to escape federal air pollution controls has been closed as part of a legal settlement Tuesday that will cause the state's agriculture to be regulated the same way it is in the rest of the country. Although agriculture is a major source of air pollution in California, the state Legislature in 1976 granted farmers an exemption from federal Clean Air Act requirements to secure permits before operating or expanding. While California pioneered many air pollution controls, it was alone among the states in granting agriculture, its largest industry, a waiver from federal air quality regulations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS and GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITERS
Hundreds more pipes are discharging bacteria-laden pollutants into the Santa Monica Bay than previously known, according to an environmental group that spent years tallying them along the 46-mile stretch of coastline. In addition, toxic metals regularly fall from the smoggy skies of Los Angeles onto the ground and then get washed into the bay by rainstorms, a group of government agencies says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2001 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
New plans to cut trees in Northern California's redwood country are reigniting the controversy surrounding the Headwaters Forest Preserve, the subject of a $480-million state and federal acquisition in 1999. A state senator who helped draft the deal says that plans by Pacific Lumber Co. violate terms of the pact that extended protection to areas of the forest that are still owned by the logging firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For months, farmers here conducted a hot and caustic war of wits with the federal government over water. Now, with the United States in a real war with a foreign enemy, Klamath Basin farmers have declared a truce. Citing love of country and undying patriotism, protesters have pulled up stakes at the makeshift encampment they established at the head gates of the Klamath irrigation project, which serves a 200,000-acre swath of farmland straddling the Oregon-California border.
NEWS
January 11, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
After a billion dollars has been spent in California removing contamination left by leaking underground gas tanks, a new study minimizing the dangers has prompted the Wilson administration to put the brakes on the costly cleanup program. The report, which has the backing of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and some funding from the oil industry, concluded that natural processes in the ground remove most of the toxic ingredients left by underground petroleum leaks.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chuck Bray was in the surf above his knees, digging with a pitchfork for one last pismo clam before the tide rose too high. Just a few yards away, his fiercest competitor, a four-legged fur ball, happily banged two clamshells together until one broke. The 50-pound sea otter, once threatened with extinction, gobbled up the clam and dived down for another. "At one point, the otter was just 15 feet from us," said the cold and soggy Bray, who drove all the way from Salinas to go clamming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The acreage exceeds that of Rhode Island, and nearly that of Delaware. All of it is located in California and protected as open space by local environmental groups that have figured out a foolproof way to conserve land: They bought it. A once-a-decade report released Tuesday by the Land Trust Alliance in Washington, D.C., calculates that 132 local and regional conservation groups in California have preserved more land than any of their peers across the nation. They have protected 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2001 | SCOTT GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government, in a surprising turnaround, ordered ranchers Friday to remove herds of cattle from thousands of acres of sensitive California desert. Federal officials will begin monitoring ranches in the Mojave Desert on Monday to ensure that cattle are relocated from about 450,000 acres of land, a move officials said will help protect the environment and aid the survival of the threatened desert tortoise, which competes with cattle for food and habitat.
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