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Environment California

NEWS
April 11, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The governing board of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California voted Tuesday to approve a $1-billion, 50-year plan to pump water from beneath the Mojave Desert despite concerns that it could exhaust the water supply required to sustain plants and wildlife. Environmentalists vowed to continue their fight to block the plan. They did not rule out a lawsuit. By 22 to 12, the MWD board voted to approve a deal with the Santa Monica-based Cadiz Land Co.
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NEWS
May 21, 1997 | PETER H. KING
Try to see it through Beachcomber Bill's eyes. William Price, 43-year-old son of Bakersfield, with a barrel chest, long, curly hair and easy manner, moved to this tiny town almost a dozen years ago and took over a beachfront shop from his ailing mother. He changed the name of the store to Beachcomber Bill's, which by now is how most people here know him. "That's it, just 'Beachcomber Bill,' " Beachcomber Bill said. "Most people don't even know my last name."
SPORTS
July 31, 1993 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lone Pine stinks. Thousands of dead fish are rotting along the nearby Owens River, and more are dying every day. Cause of death: oxygen depletion of the water caused by new, heavy flows bringing alkaline silt and organic material into the habitat. The fish are suffocating. Dan Harris, who runs Slater Sporting Goods in Lone Pine, said: "As far as I'm concerned, that ends the bass fishing in this area."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2001 | MATT SURMAN and GAIL DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Fishermen and scientists are waging a battle over the future of a slimy six-inch invertebrate whose life cycle, many admit, is still a mystery. Scientists are struggling to answer several basic questions about squid: How long do they live? How fast do they reproduce? And, perhaps most important, how many are there?
NEWS
August 12, 1999 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a step to block a new round of oil drilling off the Central Coast, the California Coastal Commission signaled its willingness Wednesday to go to court to stop development of decades-old oil leases. Meeting in Los Angeles on Wednesday, commissioners decided in closed session that "if we have to, we'll file suit," said Executive Director Peter Douglas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Half a dozen road projects across the Southland could be affected by a judge's ruling that the federal government must take steps to preserve thousands of acres that are critical to a tiny songbird. In a decision issued Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Stephen Wilson ruled that within 60 days, the U.S.
NEWS
December 18, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt on Friday praised the progress made in California toward using less water from the Colorado River and suggested that the other six states that depend on the river drop their historic distrust of their big neighbor to the west. Specifically, Babbitt, in his annual state of the river speech to regional water officials, said he wants to see an agreement between the seven Western states on how to divvy up surplus water from the Colorado.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | JAMES RAINEY and GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The California Coastal Commission will send a letter to federal officials asserting the state's authority to begin an immediate review of plans to dramatically expand oil drilling off the state's Central Coast, officials said Thursday. Members of the coastal panel said a change in federal law gives them the right to review offshore oil drilling leases that skirted state scrutiny when they were first approved nearly 20 years ago. At that time, the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Interior Secretary Gale Norton will ask the National Academy of Sciences to review the work of federal biologists that led to a shut-off of irrigation water to some farmers in the Klamath Basin, along the California-Oregon border. The request is unusual because it seeks an outside critique of experts at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, an agency Norton oversees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2001 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Federal officials and several environmental groups are working to forge an agreement to protect more than two dozen of the nation's most imperiled plants and animals, including six rare species in California. The agreement, which reportedly is close to completion, would extend protection to plants and animals that currently lack the legal safeguards provided by the U.S. Endangered Species Act, one of the nation's most powerful environmental laws.
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