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NEWS
August 12, 1999 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Taking a step to block a new round of oil drilling off the Central Coast, the California Coastal Commission signaled its willingness Wednesday to go to court to stop development of decades-old oil leases. Meeting in Los Angeles on Wednesday, commissioners decided in closed session that "if we have to, we'll file suit," said Executive Director Peter Douglas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Half a dozen road projects across the Southland could be affected by a judge's ruling that the federal government must take steps to preserve thousands of acres that are critical to a tiny songbird. In a decision issued Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Stephen Wilson ruled that within 60 days, the U.S.
NEWS
December 18, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt on Friday praised the progress made in California toward using less water from the Colorado River and suggested that the other six states that depend on the river drop their historic distrust of their big neighbor to the west. Specifically, Babbitt, in his annual state of the river speech to regional water officials, said he wants to see an agreement between the seven Western states on how to divvy up surplus water from the Colorado.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | JAMES RAINEY and GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The California Coastal Commission will send a letter to federal officials asserting the state's authority to begin an immediate review of plans to dramatically expand oil drilling off the state's Central Coast, officials said Thursday. Members of the coastal panel said a change in federal law gives them the right to review offshore oil drilling leases that skirted state scrutiny when they were first approved nearly 20 years ago. At that time, the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Interior Secretary Gale Norton will ask the National Academy of Sciences to review the work of federal biologists that led to a shut-off of irrigation water to some farmers in the Klamath Basin, along the California-Oregon border. The request is unusual because it seeks an outside critique of experts at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, an agency Norton oversees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2001 | DEBORAH SCHOCH, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Federal officials and several environmental groups are working to forge an agreement to protect more than two dozen of the nation's most imperiled plants and animals, including six rare species in California. The agreement, which reportedly is close to completion, would extend protection to plants and animals that currently lack the legal safeguards provided by the U.S. Endangered Species Act, one of the nation's most powerful environmental laws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The proposed sale of water from water-rich Imperial County to arid San Diego County, considered a key to the state's efforts to avoid a devastating cutback of how much it can take from the Colorado River, has hit a serious snag involving money and environmental concerns. The problem centers on complex and controversial efforts to devise a politically and scientifically acceptable plan to clean up the ailing Salton Sea, which straddles Imperial and Riverside counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Coastal Commission ordered Chevron to study how to remove four underwater mounds of shells offshore, the debris from 40 years of oil development. The mounds--200 feet across and 25 feet high--are made up of barnacles and mussels trimmed from the legs of oil platforms off Carpinteria and Summerland. The platforms were removed in 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 5, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush administration Monday threw its support behind setting aside vast swaths of ocean--including the waters around the Channel Islands off the Ventura County and Santa Barbara County coastline--as marine protected areas off-limits to fishing and other activities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2001 | ANNETTE KONDO and SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal officials designated 182,360 acres as critical habitat for the endangered Southwestern arroyo toad Wednesday, including land in the path of the proposed Foothill South toll road in Orange County. The preferred route of the proposed 16-mile toll road would bisect San Onofre State Park and cross San Mateo Creek, part of the critical habitat for the toad. The habitat designation by the U.S.
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