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NEWS
June 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Four men were convicted of importing 3,000 tons of toxic waste in December that caused a deadly panic in the Cambodian coastal city of Sihanoukville. Sam Moeun received seven months in prison in addition to a three-year suspended sentence and was fined $1,300. Two Taiwanese businessmen, Chang Ku-fong and Kao Jia-song, and their Cambodian translator, Phan Phung, were sentenced in absentia to five years in prison and fined about $500,000.
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NEWS
June 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Four men were convicted of importing 3,000 tons of toxic waste in December that caused a deadly panic in the Cambodian coastal city of Sihanoukville. Sam Moeun received seven months in prison in addition to a three-year suspended sentence and was fined $1,300. Two Taiwanese businessmen, Chang Ku-fong and Kao Jia-song, and their Cambodian translator, Phan Phung, were sentenced in absentia to five years in prison and fined about $500,000.
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NEWS
March 4, 1999 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nearly 3,000 tons of mercury-contaminated concrete originally came from a chemical plant here in the industrial southern tip of Taiwan. When it arrived in Cambodia in December and was dumped--with no warning labels--in a treeless, red-dirt field outside the port city of Sihanoukville, local villagers thought it might be some kind of international aid. People fought for the large plastic shipping bags, which made perfect floor mats and tarpaulins.
NEWS
March 4, 1999 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nearly 3,000 tons of mercury-contaminated concrete originally came from a chemical plant here in the industrial southern tip of Taiwan. When it arrived in Cambodia in December and was dumped--with no warning labels--in a treeless, red-dirt field outside the port city of Sihanoukville, local villagers thought it might be some kind of international aid. People fought for the large plastic shipping bags, which made perfect floor mats and tarpaulins.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1996 | From Associated Press
One of the world's poorest countries, Cambodia would seem to offer foreign investors little incentive to reach for their wallets. Decades of war have left its infrastructure in tatters, and its 8 million people make it one of Southeast Asia's tiniest markets. But Cambodia lies at the heart of Southeast Asia, a center of remarkable economic growth. This, together with an investment law hailed as one of the most liberal in the region, has aroused interest from a growing number of corporations.
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