Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEnvironment Ecuador
IN THE NEWS

Environment Ecuador

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1995 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three protesters suspended themselves from a Texaco building early Thursday after scaling the sleek 35-story high-rise with special climbing devices and unfurling a huge banner accusing the oil giant of destroying Ecuadorean rain forests. Roughly two dozen members of the Rainforest Action Network picketed outside the Texaco building at Universal City Plaza to urge consumers to boycott the company's products until it restores areas affected by oil drilling in the South American country.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | From Reuters
The government declared a national emergency in the Galapagos Islands on Monday after an oil spill half a mile from shore continued to float into the archipelago, threatening some of the world's rarest sea animals and birds, officials said. "For us, this is the equivalent of an earthquake," said presidential spokesman Alfredo Negrete, explaining that the state of emergency would let the government immediately channel the funds needed for cleanup.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
December 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Texaco Inc. Seeks Dismissal of Ecuadorean Indians' Lawsuit: The oil company said it asked a federal judge to dismiss the suit, which seeks $1.5 billion in compensation for damage to the rain forest. Last year, several Ecuadorean groups filed suit, alleging that Texaco had ruined bodies of water and land while working at the site. They also charged that waste from crude oil drilling had given some of their people cancer. White Plains, N.Y.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1995 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three protesters suspended themselves from a Texaco building early Thursday after scaling the sleek 35-story high-rise with special climbing devices and unfurling a huge banner accusing the oil giant of destroying Ecuadorean rain forests. Roughly two dozen members of the Rainforest Action Network picketed outside the Texaco building at Universal City Plaza to urge consumers to boycott the company's products until it restores areas affected by oil drilling in the South American country.
NEWS
January 23, 2001 | From Reuters
The government declared a national emergency in the Galapagos Islands on Monday after an oil spill half a mile from shore continued to float into the archipelago, threatening some of the world's rarest sea animals and birds, officials said. "For us, this is the equivalent of an earthquake," said presidential spokesman Alfredo Negrete, explaining that the state of emergency would let the government immediately channel the funds needed for cleanup.
NEWS
November 6, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After fighting off outsiders for centuries, Waorani natives have set aside their spears and arrows to welcome a U.S. petroleum company into their remote rain-forest homeland. The company, Texas-based Maxus Energy Corp., keeps the peace with the Waoranis by sponsoring community development projects, such as a school, and paying native men to help protect the natural environment along a new road into the forest.
OPINION
September 2, 2008
This month, Ecuador will hold the world's first constitutional referendum in which voters will decide, among many other reforms, whether to endow nature with certain unalienable rights. Not only would the new constitution give nature the right to "exist, persist, maintain and regenerate its vital cycles, structure, functions and its processes in evolution," but if it is approved, communities, elected officials and even individuals would have legal standing to defend the rights of nature.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2007 | From Reuters
Chevron Corp. shareholders rejected a proposal requiring a report on whether laws in countries where the oil and gas producer operates are adequate to protect human health, the environment and its own reputation. As about 40 demonstrators outside the company's headquarters called on Chevron to protect the environment in oil-producing nations, Chief Executive Dave O'Reilly said at the annual meeting Wednesday that it had done nothing wrong in a dispute in Ecuador.
WORLD
October 23, 2003 | T. Christian Miller, Times Staff Writer
It was a day they had long waited for. Hundreds of poor farmers and bare-chested indigenous people had traveled this week to this sweltering northeastern jungle town by bus, foot and canoe. They crammed into a courtroom and flowed onto the street. And finally, on Wednesday, it happened: the opening of their trial against ChevronTexaco Corp., accusing the San Ramon, Calif.-based firm of polluting their land, poisoning their families and killing their animals.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Texaco Inc. Seeks Dismissal of Ecuadorean Indians' Lawsuit: The oil company said it asked a federal judge to dismiss the suit, which seeks $1.5 billion in compensation for damage to the rain forest. Last year, several Ecuadorean groups filed suit, alleging that Texaco had ruined bodies of water and land while working at the site. They also charged that waste from crude oil drilling had given some of their people cancer. White Plains, N.Y.
NEWS
November 6, 1994 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After fighting off outsiders for centuries, Waorani natives have set aside their spears and arrows to welcome a U.S. petroleum company into their remote rain-forest homeland. The company, Texas-based Maxus Energy Corp., keeps the peace with the Waoranis by sponsoring community development projects, such as a school, and paying native men to help protect the natural environment along a new road into the forest.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|