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January 1, 1987
The Reagan Administration, hoping to avoid an early showdown with the new Congress, would agree to spending $12 billion to help clean up polluted waterways, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency said. Lee M. Thomas said in an interview that the amount is "a good, viable alternative" to the $18 billion contained in the Clean Water Act reauthorization bill that President Reagan vetoed on Nov. 6.
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NEWS
January 7, 1987 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
In a strong challenge to President Reagan, bipartisan coalitions in the Senate and House on Tuesday introduced an $18-billion bill to clean up the nation's rivers and lakes. Last November, Reagan vetoed identical legislation as too expensive. Sponsors of the Clean Water Act, which was passed unanimously by both houses last year, vowed to have the bill on Reagan's desk by the end of this week and predicted that they had more than enough votes to override another veto.
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NEWS
January 7, 1987 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
In a strong challenge to President Reagan, bipartisan coalitions in the Senate and House on Tuesday introduced an $18-billion bill to clean up the nation's rivers and lakes. Last November, Reagan vetoed identical legislation as too expensive. Sponsors of the Clean Water Act, which was passed unanimously by both houses last year, vowed to have the bill on Reagan's desk by the end of this week and predicted that they had more than enough votes to override another veto.
NEWS
January 1, 1987
The Reagan Administration, hoping to avoid an early showdown with the new Congress, would agree to spending $12 billion to help clean up polluted waterways, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency said. Lee M. Thomas said in an interview that the amount is "a good, viable alternative" to the $18 billion contained in the Clean Water Act reauthorization bill that President Reagan vetoed on Nov. 6.
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