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NEWS
October 2, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the skies over the City of Light blurred by an eye-smarting pall of le Smog, French authorities for the first time ordered half of Parisian motorists to leave their cars home Wednesday and get to work and back some other way. And to the surprise of many, the people of Paris--ferociously individualistic and devoted to their automobiles--mostly complied. Socialist Prime Minister Lionel Jospin drove to the weekly meeting of the Cabinet in a two-door, electric-powered Peugeot.
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NEWS
December 14, 1999 | From Associated Press
Rough waves and heavy winds Monday churned up a diesel oil slick from a tanker that split in two off northwestern France, reducing chances that the slick will remain intact and cause extensive environmental damage, officials said. By dusk Monday, both halves of the 24-year-old Erika, registered in Malta, had slipped under water. The tanker, which broke up Sunday, carried nearly 8 million gallons of diesel oil. The vessel was heading from Rotterdam in the Netherlands to Livorno, Italy.
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NEWS
December 14, 1999 | From Associated Press
Rough waves and heavy winds Monday churned up a diesel oil slick from a tanker that split in two off northwestern France, reducing chances that the slick will remain intact and cause extensive environmental damage, officials said. By dusk Monday, both halves of the 24-year-old Erika, registered in Malta, had slipped under water. The tanker, which broke up Sunday, carried nearly 8 million gallons of diesel oil. The vessel was heading from Rotterdam in the Netherlands to Livorno, Italy.
NEWS
January 3, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You've had your finger on your country's nuclear trigger, managed one of the world's largest economies and palled around on a first-name basis with other global heavyweights. So what do you do when you're in your 70s and off the international stage? If you're Valery Giscard d'Estaing, the former French president, the answer is this: You decide to spend $71 million (at latest reckoning) of your neighbors' taxes and other public funds to build a volcano in the middle of France.
NEWS
January 3, 1998 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You've had your finger on your country's nuclear trigger, managed one of the world's largest economies and palled around on a first-name basis with other global heavyweights. So what do you do when you're in your 70s and off the international stage? If you're Valery Giscard d'Estaing, the former French president, the answer is this: You decide to spend $71 million (at latest reckoning) of your neighbors' taxes and other public funds to build a volcano in the middle of France.
FOOD
November 24, 1989 | From Reuter
The black truffle, ultimate symbol of luxury and refinement in French gastronomy, is in danger of disappearing. To ensure its survival, experts from Carpentras, in the heart of France's biggest truffle-producing region in the south, have taken the unusual step of creating the world's first university devoted to the study of this famous delicacy. The so-called Perigord truffle is a black crinkly mushroom, about the size of a potato, with a pungent, earthy flavor.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2000 | Associated Press
French Prime Minister Lionel Jospin opened an international monetary conference over the weekend reiterating his confidence in the euro, saying the currency has "definitively" created a new business environment for Europe. The conference, which closes Wednesday, brings together the heads of the world's main central banks, including U.S.
NEWS
September 22, 1991 | PAUL ALEXANDER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Island nations across the Pacific face environmental threats from outside and social problems at home as they try to meet the future without losing their identity. To the eye, not much has changed in recent decades. Tourists come to escape the rat race. The diving, swimming and sailing are as good as ever in still pristine waters. The landscape is lush, the pace slow and idyllic.
NEWS
August 21, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The graffiti screeched, "No to the Frogs." Perfume and cognac sales plummeted. Newspaper columnists unleashed a flurry of invective against "Napoleonic arrogance." Sydney's annual Cointreau Ball was canceled on Bastille Day. And zealots burned down the offices of the honorary French consul in Perth. Not only did this recent anti-French furor in Australia over the planned resumption of nuclear testing in the Pacific surprise France, it surprised Australians as well.
NEWS
May 11, 1987 | TIA GINDICK, Gindick, a former Times staff writer, recently returned home after spending a year traveling in Europe and delighting in Paris
We always returned to it no matter who we were or how it was changed or with what difficulties or ease it could be reached. Paris was always worth it. . . . --Ernest Hemingway, "A Moveable Feast" Americans--grinning, blunt, friendly Americans--have always come to Paris. Or have wanted to. It was probably Hemingway who started it, he and that whole scene known as the Lost Generation.
NEWS
October 2, 1997 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the skies over the City of Light blurred by an eye-smarting pall of le Smog, French authorities for the first time ordered half of Parisian motorists to leave their cars home Wednesday and get to work and back some other way. And to the surprise of many, the people of Paris--ferociously individualistic and devoted to their automobiles--mostly complied. Socialist Prime Minister Lionel Jospin drove to the weekly meeting of the Cabinet in a two-door, electric-powered Peugeot.
FOOD
November 24, 1989 | From Reuter
The black truffle, ultimate symbol of luxury and refinement in French gastronomy, is in danger of disappearing. To ensure its survival, experts from Carpentras, in the heart of France's biggest truffle-producing region in the south, have taken the unusual step of creating the world's first university devoted to the study of this famous delicacy. The so-called Perigord truffle is a black crinkly mushroom, about the size of a potato, with a pungent, earthy flavor.
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