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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1998 | JOE MOZINGO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On stifling summer days, slow sea breezes have long brought the smell of death to Boyle Heights. Just upwind in the industrial yards on the Los Angeles River sits Darling International, a rambling complex of old buildings and gangways with the less than glamorous job of disposing of Southern California's dead animals--from dairy cows and horses to the occasional zoo elephant.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
Federal workers Wednesday began digging up the frontyard of the first of about 25 homes contaminated with DDT in the Harbor Gateway area. The Environmental Protection Agency plans to remove and replace six feet of contaminated soil from frontyards on the west side of Kenwood Avenue. Several residents of the neighborhood have been temporarily relocated during the cleanup, which could take as long as four months, said EPA spokeswoman Lisa Fasano.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1998 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, customers bought bagels, snacks, liquor and Mexican food at the Canoga Center. But the only signs of life now at the little strip mall, which sits vacant behind a 10-foot-high fence and razor wire, are the shining eyes of stray cats peering from dark doorways. Pigeons have claimed what remains of the Chatsworth Plating Co., a firm that Los Angeles County prosecutors allege poisoned the lot on Canoga Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2001 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lot is expected of a river. Its symbolic power exceeds any mountain or valley. A river suggests the journey of life and the flow of time, and has down through centuries of literature. A river bounds the threshold of the underworld. It conjures images of lovers in the moonlight, adventure on a raft, the wilds of cedar forests and rocky canyons. Which is why the puny, desolate Los Angeles River so often invites disdain, if it is noticed at all.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The controversy surrounding potentially harmful petroleum coke in the county's ports broadened Thursday, when a second lawsuit was filed against a major coal terminal and the U.S. Customs Service announced plans to close its main building on Terminal Island, partly because of coke dust contamination.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
A Southern California company that was the first in the state to obtain permits to build a commercial hazardous waste incinerator has abandoned the Los Angeles County project, charging Thursday that "political pressure" had unraveled the 6-year-old deal.
BUSINESS
January 6, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some Hollywood studios want to turn sitcom sets into sofas. The major studios in Los Angeles produce more than 41,000 tons of solid waste--40% of it wood--each year. Most of the wood, used primarily to build studio production sets, is sent to landfills after the sets are disassembled.
NEWS
October 13, 1999 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The Los Angeles Basin has been dethroned as the Smog Capital of the U.S.--at least for 1999. This year is the first in more than five decades without full-scale smog alert conditions anywhere in the region. Also, for the first time, another U.S. city has claimed the title as the smoggiest place in the nation. Houston, by all indicators, has had a worse year, experiencing 44 days when ozone levels exceeded national health standards--one more day than the Los Angeles region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1993 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The environmental group Heal the Bay has called for the closure of Mother's Beach, a popular recreation area in Marina del Rey, and the imposition of a $60 yearly boater's fee to help clean up the waters of the world's biggest man-made marina. "The extent of the marina's pollution goes far beyond the trash and oily sheen commonly seen floating on the water's surface," the group said in its "State of the Marina" report, which was released last week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1996 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's always a lot of ground to cover when the subject is ivy. It's loathsome stuff, says Patricia Earl. "It's a menace, out of control. None of that ivy is any good." No, it's wondrously beautiful, counters Patricia Hammer. "I can't say anything bad about ivy. Once gardeners see the varieties of ivies, they're enchanted." Earl is a Hollywood Hills nature lover who is campaigning to rid Los Angeles of burgeoning ivy vines that she claims are killing trees and natural vegetation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2001 | OFELIA CASILLAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developers of the controversial Playa Vista project unveiled a visitor center Tuesday to explain the project to the public--complete with interactive video, pictorial histories of the site and renderings of its future. Part of the 1,087-acre Westside project of housing, offices, stores and parkland, the information center symbolizes what developers said is their intention to merge nature and technology.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Audubon Society knows that no animal is more urbanized than a bird, whether it's a red-tailed hawk checking the scene from a telephone pole in Watts or a parrot in Pasadena squawking neighbors into a fury at dawn. With that in mind, the national bird-lovers' group will announce plans today to build its first urban nature center in Los Angeles County--among grasslands and a grove of walnut trees just northeast of downtown Los Angeles. Yes, there is wilderness in East L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2001 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developers of the massive, highly controversial Playa Vista project on Los Angeles' Westside got good news Thursday with the release of a city review of potential environmental hazards on the site. The report, compiled by the City Council's chief legislative analyst with a group of city agencies and outside consultants, concluded that various potential hazards--including underground methane gas--all can be satisfactorily addressed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2001 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The streets of Los Angeles have been soaked by storms, but, so far this year, they have been free of something else often associated with rain--sewage. Two months ago, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sued Los Angeles for violations of the Clean Water Act, saying its past rate of sewage spills, averaging 50 per month, was inordinately high. Since then, the city has weathered this winter's storms with no sewage overflows. Almost 14 inches of rain has fallen in Los Angeles since Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2001 | JOE MOZINGO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The day after a major decision to halt the flow of trash into the Los Angeles River, Lewis MacAdams headed down between the downpours to the spot where he first saw a bit of nature in the industrial wastes more than 15 years ago. In those days, the poet was one of the river's few advocates, the spokesman for a joke, really. Those who knew that the river existed generally thought it was a giant gutter, as artificial as the Long Beach Freeway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 2001 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Matson Navigation Co., the leading shipper of goods between the West Coast and Hawaii, agreed to plead guilty to criminal charges and pay $3 million in fines Thursday for lying about dumping oil-contaminated water into the Pacific Ocean. The charges are part of an ongoing crackdown by the Justice Department and the Environmental Protection Agency against ocean polluters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2001 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lot is expected of a river. Its symbolic power exceeds any mountain or valley. A river suggests the journey of life and the flow of time, and has down through centuries of literature. A river bounds the threshold of the underworld. It conjures images of lovers in the moonlight, adventure on a raft, the wilds of cedar forests and rocky canyons. Which is why the puny, desolate Los Angeles River so often invites disdain, if it is noticed at all.
NEWS
January 9, 2001 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and state officials filed suit Monday against Los Angeles, demanding that the city stop its frequent sewage spills, which are occurring at a rate of almost two per day. "The high number of spills we've seen in the last few years is a serious public health problem," said Alexis Strauss, director of the EPA's regional water division. Los Angeles recently spent $1.6 billion to upgrade its Hyperion sewage treatment plant to meet environmental standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2001 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal officials on Monday cleared a key roadblock to the civilian use of surplus Navy housing in the harbor area by announcing a plan to protect the endangered Palos Verdes blue butterflies that live on the property. "It's a win for the blue butterfly and a win for the community," said Rep. Jane Harman (D-Torrance), who worked on the plan. "The bottom line is that the reuse proposal remains intact and there will be habitat set aside on adjacent Navy property."
NEWS
January 9, 2001 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and state officials filed suit Monday against Los Angeles, demanding that the city stop its frequent sewage spills, which are occurring at a rate of almost two per day. "The high number of spills we've seen in the last few years is a serious public health problem," said Alexis Strauss, director of the EPA's regional water division. Los Angeles recently spent $1.6 billion to upgrade its Hyperion sewage treatment plant to meet environmental standards.
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