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NEWS
December 31, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Louisiana black bear as a "threatened" species under the Endangered Species Act but decided to permit continued logging and forestry operations in the animal's remaining habitat--two river basins in Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi. The decision, which stops short of designating the bear as "endangered," was criticized by wildlife activists.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Sen. J. Bennett Johnston (D-La.), one of the most influential members of Congress on environmental issues, has urged the Clinton Administration to move more rapidly to approve California's first nuclear waste dump, the proposed Ward Valley disposal site in the eastern Mojave Desert.
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NEWS
May 25, 1993 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imposing the second-largest civil penalty ever under federal environmental laws, the U.S. Department of Justice and the Environmental Protection Agency announced a fine Monday of $11.1 million against Louisiana-Pacific Corp. for Clean Air Act violations at 14 of its plants. Louisiana-Pacific either failed to obtain required air permits for the wood product plants or got them by using misleading information, the EPA said.
NEWS
May 25, 1993 | RUDY ABRAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Imposing the second-largest civil penalty ever under federal environmental laws, the U.S. Department of Justice and the Environmental Protection Agency announced a fine Monday of $11.1 million against Louisiana-Pacific Corp. for Clean Air Act violations at 14 of its plants. Louisiana-Pacific either failed to obtain required air permits for the wood product plants or got them by using misleading information, the EPA said.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
The nation's only offshore port for supertankers has not had a serious spill in eight years of operation, but neither has it made a profit. It was hoped that the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port could become a model for others around the country, but its mixed performance leaves that matter open to question. The port, known as LOOP, sits 19 miles off the coast in 115 feet of water--deep enough for the biggest tankers in the world to tie up and unload their cargo.
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Sen. J. Bennett Johnston (D-La.), one of the most influential members of Congress on environmental issues, has urged the Clinton Administration to move more rapidly to approve California's first nuclear waste dump, the proposed Ward Valley disposal site in the eastern Mojave Desert.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like the alligator, Joe Arledge in repose--say over coffee down at the Waffle House--seems no more deadly than an old log lying by the road. He is an amiable fellow, a slightly built man with black hair and bushy eyebrows who loves to talk, especially about alligators. Listen: "Now the alligator is not a man-eater," he said between sips of coffee. "It's not gonna go out there and eat you. But every once in a while, you'll get one that will. They've got some mean ol' gators.
NEWS
October 17, 1990 | PAULA OGBURN, Paula Ogburn is a free-lance writer based in Orange.
Claims that link air conditioning with illness have become more numerous and widely publicized in recent years. Some airline passengers and attendants, confined during long flights, suspect that on-board air-conditioning systems spread illness; many office workers complain of frequent colds, headaches and other ailments that they attribute to air conditioning. But is air conditioning a health menace?
OPINION
June 24, 2010
When President Obama imposed a six-month moratorium on deep-water drilling, his primary concern was safety. When a U.S. District judge in Louisiana overturned that ban Tuesday, his chief concern was jobs, and a failure by the government to prove that shutting down the floating rigs would protect workers or the environment. So who was right? To some extent, both. But the president is more right. His focus on preventing another devastating accident is appropriate, and his administration's decisions should not be second-guessed by the federal judiciary — at least when the facts are as uncertain as they are in this case.
NATIONAL
August 17, 2010 | By Richard Fausset, Los Angeles Times
The day the BP oil well can be permanently declared dead has been pushed back to late August so experts can devise plans to reduce risks during the final well-killing procedure, the federal government's spill response chief said Monday. "There's nobody that wants to have this happen any quicker than I do, but there's nobody that wants to incur more risk to this operation," said Thad Allen, the national incident commander. "When we finish this thing, this will be a stake in the heart of this well, and that's my overall intention," he said.
NEWS
December 31, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Louisiana black bear as a "threatened" species under the Endangered Species Act but decided to permit continued logging and forestry operations in the animal's remaining habitat--two river basins in Louisiana and southwestern Mississippi. The decision, which stops short of designating the bear as "endangered," was criticized by wildlife activists.
NEWS
September 6, 1991 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like the alligator, Joe Arledge in repose--say over coffee down at the Waffle House--seems no more deadly than an old log lying by the road. He is an amiable fellow, a slightly built man with black hair and bushy eyebrows who loves to talk, especially about alligators. Listen: "Now the alligator is not a man-eater," he said between sips of coffee. "It's not gonna go out there and eat you. But every once in a while, you'll get one that will. They've got some mean ol' gators.
BUSINESS
December 12, 1989 | From Associated Press
The nation's only offshore port for supertankers has not had a serious spill in eight years of operation, but neither has it made a profit. It was hoped that the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port could become a model for others around the country, but its mixed performance leaves that matter open to question. The port, known as LOOP, sits 19 miles off the coast in 115 feet of water--deep enough for the biggest tankers in the world to tie up and unload their cargo.
NATIONAL
May 26, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz and Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times
Some fishermen who have been hired by BP to clean up the gulf oil spill say they have become ill after working long hours near waters fouled with oil and dispersant, prompting a Louisiana lawmaker to call on the federal government to open mobile clinics in rural areas to treat them. The fishermen report severe headaches, dizziness, nausea and difficulty breathing. Concerned by the reports, Rep. Charlie Melancon (D-La.) wrote to Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius asking the agency's help providing medical treatment, especially in Plaquemines Parish, a southern region where many fishermen live.
NATIONAL
May 25, 2010 | By Ashley Powers, Julie Cart and Bettina Boxall
In a sign of diminished confidence in BP's ability to manage the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, federal officials Monday said they intended to require the company to dramatically scale back its use of oil dispersants and would initiate their own tests on the chemicals' effect on sea life. With an oil spill of epic proportions looming offshore, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Lisa P. Jackson — along with angry chorus of lawmakers — chided BP for its lack of transparency.
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