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NEWS
August 8, 1997 | From the Washington Post
As a massive fish kill continued in the Pocomoke River on Maryland's Eastern Shore on Thursday, officials indefinitely banned the public from a nearly five-mile stretch of the scenic waterway. The state Department of Natural Resources sent a team of scientists to the Pocomoke, where they gathered water, mud and fish samples for analysis.
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NEWS
July 24, 1999 | From Reuters
Maryland officials were investigating Friday what caused at least 500,000 fish to die along two Chesapeake Bay tributaries in the second major fish kill to strike the area in less than a month. Water samples from the Pocomoke River and its Eastern Shore Virginia tributary, Bullbegger Creek, have been forwarded to labs as far away as Florida to make sure the huge school of menhaden that died was not killed by chemicals or the dreaded toxic microorganism Pfiesteria piscicida.
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NEWS
July 24, 1999 | From Reuters
Maryland officials were investigating Friday what caused at least 500,000 fish to die along two Chesapeake Bay tributaries in the second major fish kill to strike the area in less than a month. Water samples from the Pocomoke River and its Eastern Shore Virginia tributary, Bullbegger Creek, have been forwarded to labs as far away as Florida to make sure the huge school of menhaden that died was not killed by chemicals or the dreaded toxic microorganism Pfiesteria piscicida.
NEWS
September 20, 1997 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ailing fish began to appear in the spring, floating at the surface of dark, brackish waters--raw, red lesions pockmarking their silver skin. At first, the outbreak of Pfisteria piscicida--a mysterious microscopic organism with a voracious ability to destroy fish populations--seemed restricted to just one stream. But this month, the scope of the problem expanded dramatically--both in terms of geography and, more ominously, in its victims.
NEWS
September 20, 1997 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ailing fish began to appear in the spring, floating at the surface of dark, brackish waters--raw, red lesions pockmarking their silver skin. At first, the outbreak of Pfisteria piscicida--a mysterious microscopic organism with a voracious ability to destroy fish populations--seemed restricted to just one stream. But this month, the scope of the problem expanded dramatically--both in terms of geography and, more ominously, in its victims.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | TODD SHIELDS, THE WASHINGTON POST
All biologists meant to do by injecting electronic bugs into the bellies of thousands of Potomac River bass a few years ago was track fish. Instead, they reeled in a surprise catch--what law enforcement authorities are calling Maryland's largest fish-poaching case.
SPORTS
October 30, 1989 | GARR KLUENDER
The Lakers will miss Kareem Abdul-Jabbar at center, but they don't appear to be in the same straits as the Washington Bullets. Writes Jan Hubbard of Newsday: "The Bullets have a bleak center situation with Mel Turpin (a mere 264 pounds of blubber) and rookie Doug Roth, who is legally blind in one eye." On the Houston Rockets: "They have three recovering drug users on their team--John Lucas, Mitchell Wiggins and Lewis Lloyd.
SPORTS
March 18, 1988 | MAL FLORENCE, Times Staff Writer
West Coast basketball teams aren't highly respected nationally. They're mocked by ESPN's Dick Vitale, and some of the region's best high school players prefer to play for colleges with more visible and stronger programs in the East, Midwest and South. Coach Jerry Pimm of UC Santa Barbara is, of course, aware of this condition and he'd like to do something about it.
NEWS
August 8, 1997 | From the Washington Post
As a massive fish kill continued in the Pocomoke River on Maryland's Eastern Shore on Thursday, officials indefinitely banned the public from a nearly five-mile stretch of the scenic waterway. The state Department of Natural Resources sent a team of scientists to the Pocomoke, where they gathered water, mud and fish samples for analysis.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | TODD SHIELDS, THE WASHINGTON POST
All biologists meant to do by injecting electronic bugs into the bellies of thousands of Potomac River bass a few years ago was track fish. Instead, they reeled in a surprise catch--what law enforcement authorities are calling Maryland's largest fish-poaching case.
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