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NEWS
May 18, 1999 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 15 years, Carmen Pabon has done something others might find inconceivable: She's been an urban gardener in the heart of New York City, lovingly tending a plot of vacant city land on Manhattan's blighted Lower East Side. Laboring on a street of rundown buildings, some of them torched by arsonists in the 1970s, she and other gardeners like her across the city have spent years planting flowers, raising vegetables and reaping a new sense of community.
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NEWS
May 18, 1999 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 15 years, Carmen Pabon has done something others might find inconceivable: She's been an urban gardener in the heart of New York City, lovingly tending a plot of vacant city land on Manhattan's blighted Lower East Side. Laboring on a street of rundown buildings, some of them torched by arsonists in the 1970s, she and other gardeners like her across the city have spent years planting flowers, raising vegetables and reaping a new sense of community.
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NEWS
May 3, 1995 | HELAINE OLEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Residents used to call it the "champagne of municipal water." The mineral-rich water that flowed unfiltered from reservoirs in Upstate New York won national taste tests and, at one point, even was bottled and sold across the United States. Today, New York City tap water is flowing into hard times. Development on land near the city's reservoirs has led to increasing amounts of pollution entering the water supply.
NEWS
May 3, 1995 | HELAINE OLEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Residents used to call it the "champagne of municipal water." The mineral-rich water that flowed unfiltered from reservoirs in Upstate New York won national taste tests and, at one point, even was bottled and sold across the United States. Today, New York City tap water is flowing into hard times. Development on land near the city's reservoirs has led to increasing amounts of pollution entering the water supply.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1989 | From the Associated Press
Exxon said Thursday that it will appoint a person with an environmental background to its board and adopt new policies that its shareholders suggested in the wake of the Alaskan oil spill. Exxon said it also will recommend that its directors establish a committee to review corporate policies and programs related to worker safety and the environment. In addition, Exxon said it will consider spending more money on environmental research and pollution prevention. About $5.5 billion has been spent in that area from 1970 to 1988, it said.
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the largest ever group of senior citizens now barges into old age, it's clear that things are going to be mighty different. On the leading edge of that generation are gay and lesbian senior citizens who are helping to define the new rules, starting with the basics: housing. Nationwide, there are the beginnings of a move to develop and build retirement communities for older gays and lesbians, a generally well-heeled segment of the senior population.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1989 | From United Press International
The Valdez principles, to be used by investors as a measure of a corporation's commitment to safeguarding the environment, were announced Thursday by an environmental and social coalition. The Coalition for Environmentally Responsible Economies, or CERES, said the 10 principles would be immediately circulated among major U.S. corporations for signatories. CERES said it would monitor the adherence to the principles by corporations, whether they are signatories or not, and make public the results.
NEWS
August 22, 1993 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you value your sanity, don't spend time at Deborah Beere's. That advice comes from Beere herself, a person so undone by noise that she wants to move out of her West L.A. bungalow only three months after she rented it. Beere keeps windows closed and fans humming at all times, but still gets no relief. The personal trainer says she prays for clients to book 5:30 a.m. appointments so she can leave home "before the big morning noise."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1993 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you value your sanity, don't spend time at Deborah Beere's. That advice comes from Beere herself, a person so undone by noise that she wants to move out of her West L.A. bungalow only three months after she rented it. Beere keeps windows closed and fans humming at all times, but still gets no relief. The personal trainer says she prays for clients to book 5:30 a.m. appointments so she can leave home "before the big morning noise."
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