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NEWS
June 24, 1990 | FREDERICK M. MUIR and JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Beyond his calls for water rationing and expressions of concern over expensive junkets, Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley's new-found interest in the city's Department of Water and Power encompasses a more expansive agenda: He wants to rein in the sprawling agency and fundamentally alter its course. For decades, the huge DWP has gone about its business of procuring water and creating power like a private company, and by that measure it has done quite well.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2002 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A gasoline additive that may cause cancer has had far less impact on the state's drinking-water supply than expected, and replacing it will drive gasoline prices up to $1 billion more than Gov. Gray Davis expected when he banned it, according to a California Energy Commission analyst. Still, analyst Gordon Schremp and other state officials said they support Davis' decision to phase out MTBE, or methyl tertiary-butyl ether, by the end of 2003. "MTBE needs to go. Period," said William L.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1995 | MARTHA WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's highest-ranking environmental official Friday declared staunch opposition to a move to de-federalize urban national parks--particularly the Santa Monica Mountains--which he called "critically important windows into the natural world for the vast majority of urban kids."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1995 | MARTHA WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's highest-ranking environmental official Friday declared staunch opposition to a move to de-federalize urban national parks--particularly the Santa Monica Mountains--which he called "critically important windows into the natural world for the vast majority of urban kids."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2002 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A gasoline additive that may cause cancer has had far less impact on the state's drinking-water supply than expected, and replacing it will drive gasoline prices up to $1 billion more than Gov. Gray Davis expected when he banned it, according to a California Energy Commission analyst. Still, analyst Gordon Schremp and other state officials said they support Davis' decision to phase out MTBE, or methyl tertiary-butyl ether, by the end of 2003. "MTBE needs to go. Period," said William L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2005 | Susana Enriquez and Lisa Richardson, Times Staff Writers
About 60 protesters confronted the operator of Rochester House in Los Angeles on Friday about the 20 registered sex offenders living there. The protesters, chanting as they marched a short way to the sober-living residence, were met by Edmund Anderson, who had set up a stage with microphones in the driveway, hoping to have a dialogue. He already was in the process of finding other locations for the offenders, he told the crowd. "I am phasing them out, and I am relocating them," Anderson said.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1999 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Homer Simpson celebrates his 10th anniversary on Fox next year, the party will spill over from broadcast television into News Corp.'s stable of radio, newspaper, online and marketing businesses. Increasingly, media companies are leveraging their far-flung empires to attract advertising dollars in what is becoming an increasingly competitive environment. News Corp.
WORLD
May 11, 2008 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
When the cyclone hit her homeland a week ago, Mya Moeswe was frantic about her sister back in Myanmar. Thousands of miles away in Vancouver, Canada, the 38-year-old mechanical engineer sobbed as she tried over and over to get through the downed telephone lines. Desperate for information, she turned to network television and other mainstream media, only to find them overly broad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2000 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a contributing editor to The Times
Hi, I'm an e-columnist, and this is my Web page (available for purchase). Click here for the headlines: *Meet Our New Big Brother: AOL. *Microsoft Is a Paper Tiger. *Justice Department Antitrust Division All but Shuts Down. *AT&T Controls Nada. *AOL's Whine About Open Access: Pure Bull. Will AOL Let Other Portals Play at Broadband?
WORLD
April 17, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY - A highly touted system to protect Mexican reporters working in one of the world's most dangerous countries for journalists is failing miserably and may in fact further imperil those it is intended to help, media advocates say. In the first year of the administration of President Enrique Peña Nieto, killings of journalists declined significantly but other attacks multiplied, organizations that work on behalf of reporters said....
NEWS
June 24, 1990 | FREDERICK M. MUIR and JANE FRITSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Beyond his calls for water rationing and expressions of concern over expensive junkets, Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley's new-found interest in the city's Department of Water and Power encompasses a more expansive agenda: He wants to rein in the sprawling agency and fundamentally alter its course. For decades, the huge DWP has gone about its business of procuring water and creating power like a private company, and by that measure it has done quite well.
OPINION
May 16, 2004 | James M. Taylor
During the 2000 and 2001 congressional sessions, a group of federal lawmakers attempted one of the largest land grabs in history. Designated the Conservation and Reinvestment Act, the measure would have required the federal government to spend more than $3 billion a year, in the name of "conservation," to buy land held by private citizens. But in 2000, the bill stalled in the Senate. And in 2001, a redrafted bill generated no more enthusiasm.
NATIONAL
September 8, 2011 | By Mark Z. Barabak, Los Angeles Times
Ask Kirk Sampson about business and he smiles broadly. It's booming, he says, before pausing a beat and explaining: He's in the foreclosure business. In 35 years as a real estate attorney, the 61-year-old Sampson has never seen a worse economy. "I see people hurting every day," he says, and by then his smile has vanished. Sampson doesn't see Washington doing much to create jobs. To the contrary, President Obama, whom Sampson supported in 2008, seems in over his head. Congress is gridlocked, Sampson says, and the pitchfork battalions of the "tea party" movement have only contributed to the stalemate by opposing any attempts at compromise.
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