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NEWS
November 10, 2000 | KATHERINE ELLISON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a landmark--though mostly symbolic--deal announced Thursday, a Northern California conservation group has sold the air-cleansing capacity of trees on 5,000 acres to a Texas energy company. The aim of the sale is to help deter global warming and to win some public relations points for clean energy and old-growth forests. In the deal, Pacific Forest Trust, based in Santa Rosa, sold $6,000 worth of "carbon emissions reduction credits" to Green Mountain Energy Co.
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NEWS
July 20, 1995 | MARLA CONE and MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the most far-reaching decision in the history of the Endangered Species Act, the Clinton Administration on Wednesday announced a proposal to declare coho salmon a threatened species in Northern California and Oregon. For decades a beloved cultural, economic and environmental icon in the Pacific Northwest, the wild fish is headed toward extinction and needs federal protection, government fisheries experts announced after a two-year review.
NEWS
August 9, 2001 | Associated Press
Federal irrigation officials in the drought-parched Klamath Basin worked out a deal Wednesday to buy a little more water for a wildlife refuge that is the winter home to hundreds of threatened bald eagles. Working through a court-ordered mediation process seeking long-range solutions to the basin's water crisis, the U.S.
NEWS
September 25, 2000 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Californians are paying for environmentalism--and smoked salmon--in ways they might never have suspected: through higher energy bills. Environmentalists who oppose the Northwest hydroelectric system of dams, reservoirs and powerhouses because it impedes migratory salmon have succeeded in forcing dam operators to scale back operations. That has worked to reduce the supply--and increase the cost--of hydroelectricity in the Northwest and by extension in California, where much of it is sold.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Endangered species regulation will move from the rural back-country to the heart of one of the nation's fastest-growing metropolitan areas today with the federal government's expected decision to extend protected status to salmon in urban waters around the cities of Seattle and Portland, Ore.
NEWS
October 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
Helped by $5 million from the Internet community, the Nature Conservancy has bought a large chunk of a prairie ecosystem that once stretched across the Northwest. The conservancy paid $11.7 million for the 27,000-acre Camp Creek Ranch, which represents almost 20% of the Zumwalt prairie. The bunch grass prairie covers 146,000 acres overall--more than one-fifth the size of Rhode Island--and is home to one of the nation's densest concentrations of nesting birds of prey.
NEWS
February 14, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Oregon Department of Agriculture has closed the commercial harvest of Coos Bay oysters, saying spilled fuel from the grounded freighter New Carissa has pushed into a sensitive estuary. Friday's closure affects four large oyster farms, which have about $10 million worth of young oysters seeded into a bay that ranks as the richest oyster-farming area in Oregon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Dying seabirds along the Oregon coast are considered a warning sign of ominous changes in the Pacific Ocean that may have potentially disastrous effects for the environment. The common murre is starving and washing up on Oregon beaches at eight times the normal rate because the birds are not finding enough to eat during nesting season, their most stressful time of the year. "If Oregon's most numerous seabird is in trouble, we know things are bad out there," said Roy Lowe, a biologist with the U.
NATIONAL
February 19, 2010 | By Kim Murphy
A 10-year moratorium on offshore oil and gas development along the Oregon coast won final passage in the Legislature on Thursday, though lawmakers stopped short of adopting a permanent ban. The bill extends a previous moratorium that had expired Jan. 2 for the three-mile-wide stretch of state coastal waters. There are few known oil resources offshore and no big push for exploration, but environmental, fishing and tourism groups pressed to extend the ban, fearful that the federal government could move to open waters farther offshore to drilling.
SPORTS
September 16, 2013 | By Chris Foster
This could be viewed as the next best thing to another week off for the UCLA football team, giving the Bruins more than two weeks to prepare for the Pac-12 Conference opener at Utah. Coach Jim Mora might scoff at the thought, and there might be a stern look peering out from beneath the brim of his tightly attached baseball cap if asked, but facts are hard to ignore. The Bruins should get a light workout from New Mexico State on Saturday night at the Rose Bowl. The Aggies are 0-3 and have lost 14 consecutive games.
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