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NEWS
March 14, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The four-wheel-drive vehicle crunches over brittle, sunbaked rocks before stopping within inches of a chasm that cuts across the Saudi Arabian plateau, at the head of a gorge stretching for miles into the distance. Naif Mutlak Bugumi, dressed in the two-toned, ankle-length khaki robe and red-and-white headdress that is the smart new uniform of a Saudi game ranger, never seems worried that the cliff might not hold and that his car and two American passengers might tumble into a 300-yard abyss.
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NEWS
March 14, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The four-wheel-drive vehicle crunches over brittle, sunbaked rocks before stopping within inches of a chasm that cuts across the Saudi Arabian plateau, at the head of a gorge stretching for miles into the distance. Naif Mutlak Bugumi, dressed in the two-toned, ankle-length khaki robe and red-and-white headdress that is the smart new uniform of a Saudi game ranger, never seems worried that the cliff might not hold and that his car and two American passengers might tumble into a 300-yard abyss.
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NEWS
February 4, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Persian Gulf nations, gathering for the first time Sunday to weigh the consequences of three massive oil spills moving toward their coasts, heard an appeal for help from Saudi Arabia, where the oil is already lapping ashore. Iran, which has declared its neutrality in the Gulf War, sent a diplomat to the conference and offered its expertise in fighting the oil slicks. Iran suffered countless oil spills during its eight-year war with Iraq.
NEWS
February 4, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Persian Gulf nations, gathering for the first time Sunday to weigh the consequences of three massive oil spills moving toward their coasts, heard an appeal for help from Saudi Arabia, where the oil is already lapping ashore. Iran, which has declared its neutrality in the Gulf War, sent a diplomat to the conference and offered its expertise in fighting the oil slicks. Iran suffered countless oil spills during its eight-year war with Iraq.
WORLD
August 9, 2005 | From Associated Press
King Abdullah on Monday pardoned four prominent activists who had been jailed for criticizing the strict religious environment in Saudi Arabia and the slow pace of democratic reform. A Saudi television anchor read a statement from Interior Minister Prince Nayif ibn Abdulaziz saying the king, who has pushed an unprecedented campaign toward democracy in the kingdom, had ordered the release of the four.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1990
An anonymous Defense Department source is widely quoted as saying that contingency plans for the Persian Gulf "could result in the insertion of up to 200,000 to 250,000 (U.S.) ground forces before it's all done." He goes on to warn that if American troops must do battle, it could lead to "warfare on a scale we haven't seen since World War II." These are sobering, not to say mind-boggling thoughts.
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | PAUL HOUSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House approved a $268-billion defense spending bill Friday after rejecting across-the-board cuts that key lawmakers argued would harm the U.S. military deployment in the Persian Gulf. "We surely can't cut the defense budget at this point and have (U.S. troops) believe we don't support their deployment," said Rep. John P. Murtha (D-Pa.), who headed efforts to fend off separate proposals to impose cuts of 10%, 5% or 2% in the fiscal year that began Oct. 1.
NEWS
December 6, 1990 | BOB SIPCHEN
How many American soldiers are likely to die if a ground war breaks out in the Middle East? 1,200? 20,000? 32,000? 48,000? In fact, each of those figures has been presented as a reasonable estimate of American casualties in a one-month ground war in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. But if you haven't heard those figures, you're not alone.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bonanza that many U.S. companies once saw in the oily environmental wounds of the Persian Gulf has yet to materialize. Lacking are both the will and the way. Gulf nations have neither placed a priority on environmental repair nor provided the money to fund expensive cleanups, according to disappointed environmental-services firms. Only a few large companies that perform the environmental equivalent of crisis intervention have gained contracts in Kuwait or Saudi Arabia.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, Times Staff Writer
When U.S. fast-food marketing was becoming increasingly crowded in 1988, management at Carl Karcher Enterprises decided to look to the Far East for expansion opportunities. The owner of the Carl's Jr. restaurant chain asked Steve Kishi, then chief of the company's internal auditing department, to scout around for opportunities. Kishi found that a Japanese company, Friendly Corp. of Osaka, had been making overtures to Carl Karcher Enterprises for years.
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