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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO and JENIFER RAGLAND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a move that could affect major planned developments in Southern California, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Friday proposed designating 5.4 million acres throughout the state as critical habitat for the threatened California red-legged frog. The habitat would be the state's largest, and among the nation's biggest, for a threatened species. The government has designated 6.8 million acres as habitat critical to the northern spotted owl in Washington, Oregon and Northern California.
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NEWS
March 15, 1997 | FAYE FIORE and FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Gov. Pete Wilson has rejected a request from the federal government to participate in joint testing of the proposed Ward Valley radioactive waste dump and instead has called for a congressional investigation of what he calls political game-playing by the Clinton administration on the issue.
NEWS
February 15, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The Clinton administration has decided to reopen the environmental review of the proposed Ward Valley low-level nuclear waste dump and ask the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to test the safety of the site in the eastern Mojave Desert. A major victory for opponents of the dump, the administration's action puts the project on hold for a year or more and represents a serious setback for Gov. Pete Wilson.
NEWS
December 18, 1996 | MARLA CONE and JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Criticizing as extreme a $70-million project that would require Los Angeles to give up a sizable portion of its valuable water, city leaders vowed Tuesday to draft a more viable solution to stop severe dust storms created by the city's draining of Owens Lake in the Eastern Sierra.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1992 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
An audit of the South Coast Air Quality Management District, ordered by the Legislature after complaints from business, has concluded that the smog agency has made "significant strides" in improving its operations, but called for further efforts to bolster its effectiveness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1992 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The South Coast Air Quality Management District voted Friday to suspend preparation of 24 smog rules to allow staff to work on a revolutionary new pollution trading system. The move came amid widespread criticism by environmental groups and fears by some district board members that the region could be left without sufficient pollution control measures if the new market-based system does not work.
NEWS
August 12, 1993 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a move long sought by environmentalists, U.S. Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt on Wednesday requested Gov. Pete Wilson to hold a public hearing to review safety concerns at a proposed nuclear waste dump in the eastern California desert. In a letter to Wilson, Babbitt made it clear that even though federal law did not require such a hearing, he wanted one held before he would agree to transfer the site, now in federal hands, to the state for the proposed Ward Valley dump.
NEWS
February 28, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under normal circumstances, just getting these combative forces together in the same room--other than a courtroom--could qualify for a Nobel Peace Prize. But these aren't normal times in Southern California. So on one recent morning in Huntington Beach they sat side-by-side, like patients in group therapy. Developers and environmentalists. Biologists and urban planners. Attorneys and government regulators.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If ever there was a perfect example of how power cannot be measured solely in terms of physical prowess, it is the California gnatcatcher. A rather ordinary-looking bird with a decidedly unglamorous name, the gnatcatcher is tiny enough to cup in your hand or swat away like a fly. It doesn't soar like an eagle, glide with the grace of a panther or command the respect of a grizzly.
NEWS
March 26, 1993 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration on Thursday declared the California gnatcatcher a threatened species, making the embattled songbird the centerpiece of a national experiment. The long-awaited decision on the fate of the tiny Southern California bird, which nests among some of the nation's highest priced real estate, comes as the Administration is seeking to balance the demands of the environment and the economy. The action caps one of the fiercest battles in the two-decade history of the U.S.
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