Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEnvironment Tibet
IN THE NEWS

Environment Tibet

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
A rare species of Tibetan antelope whose fur is used to make expensive shahtoosh shawls will disappear within five years if nothing is done to protect it, an environmental group said Wednesday. The antelope--which has seen its numbers dwindle from several million a century ago to 75,000 today--is still hunted in China and its fur is openly sold in India and Britain, the International Fund for Animal Welfare said. The U.S.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 28, 2001 | From Associated Press
A rare species of Tibetan antelope whose fur is used to make expensive shahtoosh shawls will disappear within five years if nothing is done to protect it, an environmental group said Wednesday. The antelope--which has seen its numbers dwindle from several million a century ago to 75,000 today--is still hunted in China and its fur is openly sold in India and Britain, the International Fund for Animal Welfare said. The U.S.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 13, 1988 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
After decades of suppression and neglect, attempts are being made to restore the Tibetan language to a predominant position in the public life of this region. The moves are part of efforts to ease the bitter anti-Chinese sentiments of many Tibetans, feelings that erupted last fall and again in March in violent rioting against China's control of Tibet.
WORLD
April 3, 2008 | Ching-Ching Ni, Times Staff Writer
A Chinese court sentenced a prominent human rights activist today to 3 1/2 years in prison for criticizing the Communist Party, a verdict that illustrates China's determination to crack down on dissent ahead of the Summer Olympics. Hu Jia, 34, has been a fierce critic of China's controversial policies on AIDS, the environment and Tibet. He was put under house arrest in Beijing for 200 days before police took him away late last year while his wife was bathing their newborn child.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1991 | LEAH OLLMAN
Newton and Helen Mayer Harrison are healers as much as they are artists. Their remedies for renewing damaged, debased portions of the Earth come in the form of visual and verbal plans that assess the past and provide for the future. In their current show at Installation Gallery downtown, the Harrisons, who teach at UC San Diego, present excerpts from five projects, with proposals ranging in scale from building a walkway in Colorado to restoring the native environment of Tibet.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1991 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Newton and Helen Mayer Harrison are healers as much as they are artists. Their remedies for renewing damaged, debased portions of the Earth come in the form of visual and verbal plans that assess the past and provide for the future. In their current show at Installation Gallery downtown, the Harrisons, who teach at UC San Diego, present excerpts from five projects, with proposals ranging in scale from building a walkway in Colorado to restoring the native environment of Tibet.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|