Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEnvironment Washington State
IN THE NEWS

Environment Washington State

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Energy Department will announce today that it wants to preserve as a wildlife refuge 90,000 acres once used as part of the top-secret project to build the atomic bomb. The agency later this month will formally propose designating the land in Washington state to be managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The area was a security buffer for the Hanford nuclear reservation, constructed in 1943 for the Manhattan Project to build the bomb during World War II.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 21, 2000 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the biggest environmental settlement of its kind, one of the nation's largest wood and paper producers has agreed to spend up to $90 million to resolve allegations that its factories illegally pumped thousands of tons of smog-producing chemicals and other pollutants into the air, federal officials said Thursday. The settlement includes $11.2 million in penalties against Portland, Ore.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
The federal government issued new rules on Tuesday to protect West Coast salmon and steelhead, but even before they were made official, the new regulations had a full spectrum of critics. The new rules clarify restrictions on land and water use in order to protect 14 different species of endangered fish. Previously, actions that might harm those fish were reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Property rights advocates say the rules go too far in their attempt to protect the fish.
NEWS
June 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
The federal government issued new rules on Tuesday to protect West Coast salmon and steelhead, but even before they were made official, the new regulations had a full spectrum of critics. The new rules clarify restrictions on land and water use in order to protect 14 different species of endangered fish. Previously, actions that might harm those fish were reviewed on a case-by-case basis. Property rights advocates say the rules go too far in their attempt to protect the fish.
NEWS
August 12, 1997 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a call to arms to save dwindling populations of steelhead trout throughout much of the West, the federal government Monday listed the fish as endangered in Southern California and central Washington. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration also designated the fish--a favorite of anglers--as threatened in parts of Oregon, Idaho, Washington and California.
NEWS
May 19, 1992 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The air is choppy, and we are flying over the forest at what might be called treetop level, except there are hardly any trees. Well, wait, there are some. Patches of seedlings, clumps of old-growth in the canyon bottoms. But not the unbroken vistas of big, standing trees you might associate with rain-drenched Washington state and a place called the Olympic National Forest. "Exactly, that's the point," said our pilot, Michael M.
NEWS
June 27, 1996 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nine years after the last reactor shut down at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, there are 14 million gallons of deadly wastes buried in Hanford's sandy belly. Chromium and strontium are leaking into the Columbia River. Particles of radioactive Iodine-131 (eight times the amount released in the 1979 accident at Three Mile Island) blew up Hanford's smokestacks, settling like an invisible rain on the wheat-colored grass and shrubs of southeastern Washington. How deadly was the result?
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Defense Department decided against trying to unload 110 tons of PCB-contaminated waste here for even a short stay, and the container ship carrying the unwelcome cargo steamed out of port Friday. The ultimate destination of the waste, from U.S. military bases in Japan, has not been determined, a Pentagon spokesman said. "We're pleased we've been able to address the concerns of the citizens of the state of Washington," Army Lt. Col. Steve Campbell said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
July 28, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Waves of frothy oil from a sunken Japanese fishing vessel have begun washing ashore on some of America's most pristine shores, threatening sea otters and tens of thousands of birds, Coast Guard officials said Saturday. More than a dozen oil-drenched birds, both dead and alive, have been found on beaches, said state Department of Wildlife spokesman Doug Zimmer. "They're so coated," Lorraine Durick, a volunteer with the Wild Animal Clinic of Monroe told the Seattle Times. "This stuff is like glue.
NEWS
March 20, 1996 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unusual move to protect the Northwest's declining runs of wild salmon, the Clinton administration has budgeted $111 million to remove two aging dams from the Elwha River on the edge of the Olympic National Park. Stepping into a heated conflict that has pitted the seasonally spawning fish against the hydroelectric dams that power most of the Northwest, the administration included the removal of the fish-impeding dams as a major environmental initiative in the 1997 budget unveiled Tuesday.
NEWS
June 13, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A young salmon making its way to the ocean has three alternatives when it hits this 100-foot-high hunk of concrete in the middle of the Snake River. If the river's running good, it can spill with the whitewater over the top, getting its blood pumped full of dangerous levels of nitrogen gas in the froth below the dam. It can plunge down through the hydropower turbines, getting sliced up on the blades or battered against the walls.
NEWS
April 8, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Defense Department decided against trying to unload 110 tons of PCB-contaminated waste here for even a short stay, and the container ship carrying the unwelcome cargo steamed out of port Friday. The ultimate destination of the waste, from U.S. military bases in Japan, has not been determined, a Pentagon spokesman said. "We're pleased we've been able to address the concerns of the citizens of the state of Washington," Army Lt. Col. Steve Campbell said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
April 10, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Energy Department will announce today that it wants to preserve as a wildlife refuge 90,000 acres once used as part of the top-secret project to build the atomic bomb. The agency later this month will formally propose designating the land in Washington state to be managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The area was a security buffer for the Hanford nuclear reservation, constructed in 1943 for the Manhattan Project to build the bomb during World War II.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Endangered species regulation will move from the rural back-country to the heart of one of the nation's fastest-growing metropolitan areas today with the federal government's expected decision to extend protected status to salmon in urban waters around the cities of Seattle and Portland, Ore.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Pacific Northwest, charity wears several faces. There are the galas and corporate appeals that raised money for a new Seattle symphony hall. There are the Planet Hollywood cocktail receptions that sent Patty Murray back to the U.S. Senate. There is even a street-corner newspaper for the homeless, a dollar if you can spare the change. But when they found themselves with just a few months to raise $13.
NEWS
June 21, 1998 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The river workhorse begins here in the northern Idaho farm belt, slicing a canyon through the rolling grasslands of the most productive wheat fields in the nation. Here, the Snake River takes 722,000 tons a year of wheat and barley on its back and carries it down through the confluence with the Columbia River and on to the sea--465 miles of what was once the wildest river system in the West.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Endangered species regulation will move from the rural back-country to the heart of one of the nation's fastest-growing metropolitan areas today with the federal government's expected decision to extend protected status to salmon in urban waters around the cities of Seattle and Portland, Ore.
NEWS
June 21, 1998 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The river workhorse begins here in the northern Idaho farm belt, slicing a canyon through the rolling grasslands of the most productive wheat fields in the nation. Here, the Snake River takes 722,000 tons a year of wheat and barley on its back and carries it down through the confluence with the Columbia River and on to the sea--465 miles of what was once the wildest river system in the West.
NEWS
August 12, 1997 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a call to arms to save dwindling populations of steelhead trout throughout much of the West, the federal government Monday listed the fish as endangered in Southern California and central Washington. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration also designated the fish--a favorite of anglers--as threatened in parts of Oregon, Idaho, Washington and California.
NEWS
July 28, 1997 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is probably no more-contaminated place on Earth than this wind-whipped nuclear desert in central Washington, which for 45 years was the plutonium kitchen that fueled much of the U.S. nuclear arsenal. By the time it shut down production in 1989 and embarked on what would become the nation's biggest environmental cleanup, the Hanford Nuclear Reservation had accumulated 450 billion gallons of liquid wastes and 200 square miles of contaminated ground water.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|