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BUSINESS
September 2, 2001
"Eco-Labels on Food Called Into Question" [Aug. 26] mentions the Food Alliance Approved program developed by the Food Alliance and Environmental Defense. Just to be clear: neither the Environmental Defense name nor logo appears on the labeled food items. The role of Environmental Defense in this program is simply to support the expansion of environmentally friendly agriculture. Zach Willey Environmental Defense Bend, Ore.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2009
Thomas J. Graff Lawyer shaped state water policy Thomas J. Graff, 65, a lawyer and environmentalist who helped influence California water policy as regional director of the Environmental Defense Fund for 37 years, died Thursday at an Oakland hospital of complications from thyroid cancer. Graff, of Oakland, opened the California office of the Environmental Defense Fund in 1971 and helped it become one of the most powerful voices on environmental issues such as climate change, oceans and water policy.
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NEWS
July 1, 2008
Emissions ruling: An article in Business on Thursday about the legal battles over a California auto emissions law misspelled the name of an attorney representing groups including the Sierra Club and Environmental Defense. His name is Matt Pawa, not Powa. In addition, the Natural Resources Defense Council was called the Natural Resources Defense Fund.
NEWS
July 1, 2008
Emissions ruling: An article in Business on Thursday about the legal battles over a California auto emissions law misspelled the name of an attorney representing groups including the Sierra Club and Environmental Defense. His name is Matt Pawa, not Powa. In addition, the Natural Resources Defense Council was called the Natural Resources Defense Fund.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1987
Bravo, the Fund for Environmental Defense! Our Orange County Board of Supervisors recently permitted the Nichols Institute to locate its new plant in Ronald W. Caspers Wilderness Park, in spite of suggestions by many local citizens to make other arrangements. What do we need more of: A complex of 20 buildings, three shifts of hundreds of employees, seven helicopter flights daily, seven days per week, or the serenity of an undeveloped, pristine, 7,400-acre wilderness? HELEN E. CAMP Corona del Mar
HEALTH
May 6, 2002
As a physician, I was greatly interested by your article about the outbreak of a strain of Group A streptococcus that is resistant to macrolide antibiotics--key drugs that are used to treat not only strep throat but also pneumonia and other serious infections ("Resistant Strep Sounds a Warning," April 22). While the story noted that this outbreak has major implications for the way doctors think about and prescribe antibiotics in this country, it should also have major implications for the continued use of antibiotics in meat production.
OPINION
July 2, 2006
Re "U.S. Emits Half of Car-Caused Greenhouse Gas, Study Says," June 28 This article describes a study by the "environmental group" Environmental Defense. Although the size of the U.S. population is growing rapidly -- adding the equivalent of a new California every decade -- to the best of my knowledge Environmental Defense has no U.S. population policy. I guess this group believes that all these cars just drive themselves. BEN ZUCKERMAN UCLA Professor of Physics and Astronomy Westwood In the article about the U.S. car fleet and greenhouse gases, we read that Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Los Angeles)
BUSINESS
July 13, 2006 | Claire Hoffman, Times Staff Writer
Bentonville, Ark., seemed like an Emerald City of sorts Wednesday as hometown giant Wal-Mart Stores Inc. put on display its latest efforts to go green. The company hosted former Vice President Al Gore's talk on global warming, welcomed an environmental group's plan to locate an office in the corporate neighborhood and talked about the progress it was making to improve the global effects of its worldwide operations. Not everyone was buying it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1991
In recent months, articles in the media have referred to the "drawbridge syndrome" supposedly suffered by certain homeowners-cum-environmentalists. Other articles have accused us of liking birds and wildlife better than people or riding roughshod over the Fifth Amendment, which prohibits the taking of private property for public purposes. I would like to address these issues. First, those who want to profit from their land are not the only property owners in Southern California.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2006 | Claire Hoffman, Times Staff Writer
Bentonville, Ark., seemed like an Emerald City of sorts Wednesday as hometown giant Wal-Mart Stores Inc. put on display its latest efforts to go green. The company hosted former Vice President Al Gore's talk on global warming, welcomed an environmental group's plan to locate an office in the corporate neighborhood and talked about the progress it was making to improve the global effects of its worldwide operations. Not everyone was buying it.
OPINION
July 2, 2006
Re "U.S. Emits Half of Car-Caused Greenhouse Gas, Study Says," June 28 This article describes a study by the "environmental group" Environmental Defense. Although the size of the U.S. population is growing rapidly -- adding the equivalent of a new California every decade -- to the best of my knowledge Environmental Defense has no U.S. population policy. I guess this group believes that all these cars just drive themselves. BEN ZUCKERMAN UCLA Professor of Physics and Astronomy Westwood In the article about the U.S. car fleet and greenhouse gases, we read that Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Los Angeles)
HEALTH
May 6, 2002
As a physician, I was greatly interested by your article about the outbreak of a strain of Group A streptococcus that is resistant to macrolide antibiotics--key drugs that are used to treat not only strep throat but also pneumonia and other serious infections ("Resistant Strep Sounds a Warning," April 22). While the story noted that this outbreak has major implications for the way doctors think about and prescribe antibiotics in this country, it should also have major implications for the continued use of antibiotics in meat production.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2001
"Eco-Labels on Food Called Into Question" [Aug. 26] mentions the Food Alliance Approved program developed by the Food Alliance and Environmental Defense. Just to be clear: neither the Environmental Defense name nor logo appears on the labeled food items. The role of Environmental Defense in this program is simply to support the expansion of environmentally friendly agriculture. Zach Willey Environmental Defense Bend, Ore.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1998
1998 was a year of legal successes for the Environmental Defense Center, with court victories that have halted, if only temporarily, a deep-pit gravel mining project in El Rio and a proposed golf course and 16,000-seat amphitheater at Camarillo Regional Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1997 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At age 68, Carla Bard went to work for a new boss last week, with the same fire in the belly that has carried her through nearly five decades of community activism. By signing on as a full-time planner with the Environmental Defense Center's new Ventura County office, Bard picked up the pace at a time of life when many of her contemporaries are deciding how to make retirement meaningful.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1998
1998 was a year of legal successes for the Environmental Defense Center, with court victories that have halted, if only temporarily, a deep-pit gravel mining project in El Rio and a proposed golf course and 16,000-seat amphitheater at Camarillo Regional Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2004
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 1997 | DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attempting to meld the disjointed efforts of local activists, a nonprofit Santa Barbara law firm plans to open a Ventura office Monday that would be the first permanently staffed agency for environmental advocacy in Ventura County. Founded 20 years ago, the Environmental Defense Center is using a $100,000 donation from Ventura-based outdoor-clothing maker Patagonia Inc. to set up an office on Main Street.
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