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Environmental Impact Report

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1991 | MARY ANNE PEREZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Mesa Consolidated Water District board of supervisors on Thursday night approved initial steps toward building a $15-million underground reservoir at an East Costa Mesa elementary school. By a unanimous vote, the board decided that a formal environmental impact report would not be required for the project, despite opposition from speakers at the hearing who voiced concern about the proposed reservoir's impact on the neighborhood and the environment.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
A state appellate court on Thursday cleared away a legal obstacle standing in the way of plans to build a community of 60,000 residents about 35 miles north of Los Angeles. The court essentially restored a permit issued by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife that granted the Newhall Land and Farming Co. permission to alter a wild river. A three-judge panel of the California 2nd District Court of Appeal overturned a Los Angeles County Superior Court ruling that set aside a 5,828-page environmental impact report.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 1988 | H.G. REZA, Times Staff Writer
Operators of the Giant Dipper roller coaster will have to file an environmental impact report with the city before they can begin running the famed coaster this summer, a City Council committee voted Wednesday. The Public Facilities and Recreation Committee voted unanimously to approve a city manager's recommendation to require the environmental report. The council is expected to approve the committee's action next month.
OPINION
November 24, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Gov. Jerry Brown has released draft regulations to govern fracking in California that very closely follow the lines of a bill passed this year by the Legislature. The problem is that the bill itself, though better than nothing, is not strong enough to ensure the safety of the state's air, water and ground stability in the face of this controversial and not-yet-fully-understood practice. Neither the bill nor the draft regulations make it clear whether the state will require environmental impact reports for individual fracking projects under the California Environmental Quality Act. The author of the bill, Sen. Fran Pavley (D-Agoura Hills)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1989 | AMY PYLE, Times Staff Writer
Opponents of the Nancy Reagan Center for drug-abuse treatment said they are alarmed by a Los Angeles zoning official's ruling Friday that no environmental study will be needed for the proposed Lake View Terrace facility. Residents of a neighborhood surrounding the former Lake View Medical Center, where the drug center is planned, had hoped such a study would find drug treatment incompatible with residential living. However, Associate Zoning Administrator Darryl L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1990 | Interviews by LYNN O'SHAUGHNESSY
BACKGROUND Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley has proposed changing a controversial system that allows developers to hire the consultants to evaluate the environmental impact of their proposed projects. Under the mayor's plan, whose aim is to make EIRs more impartial, developers' projects would be handled more quickly if the city chose the consultant. But critics believe all consultants should be selected by the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1990 | VICKI TORRES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The practice of allowing developers to pick their own consultants to prepare environmental impact reports could be abolished statewide if a lawsuit brought by opponents of an Altadena housing project succeeds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1989 | GREG BRAXTON, Times Staff Writer
It's back. It looked for a while as if The Great Studio City Carwash Controversy had washed away. But Los Angeles City Councilman Joel Wachs on Friday introduced a motion in the City Council that would buy more time for residents who have been unsuccessful in their battle to preserve the carwash at Ventura and Laurel Canyon boulevards by having it declared a cultural monument.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1989 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for a cultural preservation association Monday filed a lawsuit against Caltrans and federal transportation agencies, charging that they illegally failed to prepare environmental impact reports for a planned $40-million Ventura Freeway interchange that could affect the historic Leonis Adobe in Calabasas. Attorney Jack Rubens, who represents the nonprofit Leonis Adobe Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1993 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Orange County Board of Supervisors paved the way Tuesday for the transformation of Katella Avenue into a $55-million "super-street," despite the bitter opposition of some local residents. Vocal protesters urged the board to reconsider the plan, flashing signs that read: "No Katella Super-Street" and "Protect Our Property Value."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - The California Supreme Court refused Monday to hold up extension of the Expo Line to Santa Monica for further review. The state high court's fractured decision was a loss for a group of homeowners associations that had argued the project's environmental impact report failed to comply with state law. The Exposition Metro Line Construction Authority approved the rail line from Culver City to Santa Monica even though the review of...
OPINION
November 28, 2012
Re "Planned demolition stirs fears," Nov. 25 Thank you for your thoughtful article, in which I was quoted, on the misguided decision by the Santa Monica City Council to allow a developer to eliminate the lovely, leafy neighborhood of seniors at the Village Trailer Park. In our small city, so lacking in parks and green space, we will soon see the historic trailer park replaced by an ugly, claustrophobic housing project that, according to its own environmental impact report, can be expected to cause significant and unavoidable traffic impacts at numerous intersections in Santa Monica and West Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 2012 | By Ann Simmons and Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
The Newhall Land and Farming Co. has filed a motion in Los Angeles County Superior Court alleging that a judge presiding over its controversial development cases has a conflict of interest and asking that she disqualify herself. In the motion filed Thursday, attorneys for Newhall Land accuse Judge Ann I. Jones of failing to disclose her work with environmentalists in an effort to stop a property near her Santa Clarita Valley home from being divided. Among those environmentalists were Sierra Club members who also oppose Newhall Land's proposed community of 60,000 residents along a six-mile stretch of the Santa Clara River, about 35 miles north of Los Angeles and four miles from Jones' home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 2012 | Ruben Vives
The environmental impact report on hydraulic fracturing at the Inglewood Oil Field was supposed to address key concerns raised by residents of the Baldwin Hills area. Instead, the report has deepened tensions between the oil field's owner, Plains Exploration & Production Co., and the community after the findings were released last week. The yearlong study -- conducted by an environmental consulting firm and paid for by the owner and operator of the oil field -- concluded that the controversial extraction method used at two wells did not affect the environment or health of those living nearby.
OPINION
September 10, 2012 | Jim Newton
The debate over whether to build a football stadium downtown is largely about costs and benefits. Are the additional traffic and other inconveniences associated with bringing one, or perhaps two, football teams to downtown worth tolerating in exchange for upgrading the city's Convention Center, creating thousands of jobs and infusing new tourist dollars into the tax base? That's a complicated but straightforward calculus, and at this point, most people who have studied the proposal think it's a worthy and important project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2012 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
One of the West's most ambitious private water marketing proposals has taken a step forward with the environmental approval ofCadiz Inc.'s plans to sell massive amounts of Mojave Desert groundwater to Southern California. The board of the Santa Margarita Water District, which serves 155,000 customers in south Orange County, voted 5 to 0 Tuesday night to sign off on the project's environmental impact report under state law. The board also agreed to buy one-tenth of the project's proposed annual yield.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1990 | LILY ENG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The City Council voted 6 to 0 Tuesday to approve the environmental impact report for a proposed $75-million sports arena, putting the city in a position to break away from Anaheim in the race to build Orange County's first indoor sports arena. The next step for the 20,000-seat facility is city approval of a financial agreement with developer Anthony V. Guanci of Newport Beach-based King Guanci Development Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2012 | By Rick Rojas, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of new homes could be built along the perimeter of a retired Marine base in Orange County that officials envision being turned into one of the nation's great urban parks, according to a proposal being considered by city officials in Irvine. The proposal from developer Fivepoint Communities Inc. would more than double the number of residences that would be built on the property surrounding the Great Park by changing the zoning of land that had been marked for commercial use and offices, city officials said.
OPINION
September 12, 2011
Legislators got the right result by the wrong process when they approved an expedited judicial review for AEG's much-discussed downtown Los Angeles football stadium. The project is too important, and the state's system for reviewing such projects too flawed, to allow procedure to stand in the way of progress. Nevertheless, it's bad policy to offer special treatment to certain projects; it raises questions of favoritism and corruption to have the Legislature engage proposals one at a time rather than passing laws that apply equally to all. That's why the next business of this Legislature needs to be a comprehensive review of the California Environmental Quality Act. Now more than 30 years old, CEQA is the mainstay of the state's vaunted environmental protection regime.
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