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BUSINESS
July 2, 1991 | PHILIPP GOLLNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Christos Richards used to help recruit engineers for big aerospace companies that also happened to be big polluters. Now some of those same companies are turning to Richards for new engineering talent to clean up the mess. Richards, 33, is co-owner and executive vice president of Career Connection, a tiny Thousand Oaks firm that puts on job fairs exclusively for environmental engineers and consultants. Richards and his partner, Stephen P.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2008 | Evelyn Larrubia, Larrubia is a Times staff writer.
"If we are to prosper as a nation," Teamsters head James Hoffa Jr., told union members in Oakland in July, "our future lies in a green economy." That might seem like an unusual declaration for a union leader. But then, Hoffa went a step further in announcing that Teamsters was abandoning its push for oil drilling in the Arctic. Environmental activists and union bosses are known for their rancor.
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BUSINESS
January 16, 1998 | Dow Jones
MotorVac Technologies Inc. named Daniel P. Whelan and Grant Ferrier directors, increasing board membership to eight from seven. MotorVac said Whelan replaces John I. Leahy, who resigned earlier this year. Whelan is president and chief executive of Evergreen Holdings, the parent company of Evergreen Oil Inc., a waste lubricant oil re-refining service provider. Ferrier is president of EBI, a research, consulting and publishing company for the environmental industry.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1998 | Dow Jones
MotorVac Technologies Inc. named Daniel P. Whelan and Grant Ferrier directors, increasing board membership to eight from seven. MotorVac said Whelan replaces John I. Leahy, who resigned earlier this year. Whelan is president and chief executive of Evergreen Holdings, the parent company of Evergreen Oil Inc., a waste lubricant oil re-refining service provider. Ferrier is president of EBI, a research, consulting and publishing company for the environmental industry.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1994 | James S. Granelli, Times staff writer
Environmental Companies Sought: Ventana, a venture capital firm, is looking for young companies in the environmental market and is collaborating with the national accounting firm of Coopers & Lybrand to find likely survivors in the $150-billion environmental services industry. The Irvine financing company and Coopers & Lybrand have agreed to look together for North American companies they could help with funding.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1996 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Of all the disappointments of the 1990s for investors and for believers in the cause, the failure of environmental industry to live up to expectations has to rank pretty high. Cleanup jobs have been fewer than anticipated. The U.A. Environmental Protection Agency will see its budget cut by roughly 15% this year--and be thankful that political reaction saved it from a 33% cut. Small environmental companies have struggled and many are now selling out.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1992 | JAMES FLANIGAN
If there is one business for which the election could make a difference, it's the environment--the quest for clean air, land and water that in 20 years has become a $120-billion-a-year industry.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1995 | From Reuters
The White House on Monday released its plan to work with the private sector to promote environmental technologies, which it said will create high-wage jobs and cut the costs of cleaning up pollution. "We are committed to promoting a new generation of innovative environmental technologies that will give us a healthier environment, a greater market share for U.S. companies and more jobs for American workers," Vice President Al Gore said.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1990 | JAMES FLANIGAN
It was both ironic and a bit sad that environmentalists--shouting "Wall Street kills"--protested outside the New York Stock Exchange on Monday. Because, for one thing, Wall Street loves the environment--it provides fresh merchandise for the securities business, after all. Just last week, a syndicate of the leading brokerage houses--Merrill Lynch, Shearson Lehman, Prudential-Bache, Paine Webber and Dean Witter--brought out a new investment trust devoted to the environment.
BUSINESS
September 15, 1991 | SONNI EFRON and JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The peace dividend is becoming a green dividend as America's largest corporations discover enormous profits to be made cleaning up the environmental mess that their own technologies spawned. Companies that once fought environmental regulation now battle pollution for profit. The fast-growing industry generated revenue of $132 billion last year--nearly the cost of the nation's savings and loan bailout if the entire bill were paid today.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Halliburton Co. will sell its environmental services unit to Tetra Tech Inc. for $32 million in cash, the two companies said. Halliburton's environmental business involves consulting, engineering and design services. Customers of the Dallas-based company include industrial clients as well as federal, state and local governments, primarily in the U.S.
NEWS
August 14, 1997 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For decades, Missouri's charcoal industry has produced 80% of the nation's barbecue fuel in a crude process as old as the log cabin, cooking up the blackened wood in giant kilns that billow forth columns of black, acrid smoke. Now, Missouri charcoal makers have finally been tugged into the 20th century--agreeing, in a deal reached with state and federal regulators, to end one of the most visible examples of open-country air pollution.
BUSINESS
April 22, 1996 | DEBORA VRANA
Koll, the Newport Beach real estate firm, has formed a joint venture with ENSR, an environmental services firm, to clean up and sell contaminated real estate properties. The new venture, Koll ENSR Environmental Realty Advisors, will be a one-stop shop that provides the capital and expertise for investors, financial services companies and corporations that need help in cleaning up and selling hazardous-waste sites.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1996 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Of all the disappointments of the 1990s for investors and for believers in the cause, the failure of environmental industry to live up to expectations has to rank pretty high. Cleanup jobs have been fewer than anticipated. The U.A. Environmental Protection Agency will see its budget cut by roughly 15% this year--and be thankful that political reaction saved it from a 33% cut. Small environmental companies have struggled and many are now selling out.
BUSINESS
April 18, 1995 | From Reuters
The White House on Monday released its plan to work with the private sector to promote environmental technologies, which it said will create high-wage jobs and cut the costs of cleaning up pollution. "We are committed to promoting a new generation of innovative environmental technologies that will give us a healthier environment, a greater market share for U.S. companies and more jobs for American workers," Vice President Al Gore said.
BUSINESS
October 9, 1994
It was with a great sense of disappointment and frustration that I and many other members of the California environmental industry read the article "Green Tape: Environmental Technology's Reality Falls Short of Hype" (Sept. 20). The article left readers with the misimpression that the California environmental technology industry is not a healthy component of our state's economy and that the state government is not doing anything to assist the industry. Nothing could be further from the truth.
NEWS
March 2, 1992 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Eco Expo returns to the Los Angeles Convention Center this weekend, Anthony S. McCready will be making his debut as an environmental entrepreneur by offering one solution to the country's landfill problem: popcorn. "We've created the first commercial, hot-air corn-popping system for the packaging industry," he says by phone from his Manhattan office. "It's an alternative to polystyrene peanuts for loose-fill packaging.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1992 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last fall, a small company called CleanAir Transit announced the "Santa Barbara Success Story": By acquiring a proven technology and a respected board of directors, it was setting out to become the nation's first company to build buses that run on electric batteries. That would be no small triumph. The company could expect to gain a significant share of an estimated $3.6-billion worldwide market in pollution-free shuttles serving airports, downtown shopping loops and recreational complexes.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1994 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If business success were a popularity contest, environmental technology would be a leading index. The industry is trumpeted by the likes of Vice President Al Gore and Gov. Pete Wilson. Its growth seems inevitable, and few would quibble with its aims--it's not every industry that can claim it's out to save the planet. But for local companies, the reality doesn't quite match the hype. Turning environmental technology into a new, green engine for job growth in California is tougher than it looks.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1994 | James S. Granelli, Times staff writer
Environmental Companies Sought: Ventana, a venture capital firm, is looking for young companies in the environmental market and is collaborating with the national accounting firm of Coopers & Lybrand to find likely survivors in the $150-billion environmental services industry. The Irvine financing company and Coopers & Lybrand have agreed to look together for North American companies they could help with funding.
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