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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Catherine Saillant
Candidates seeking to replace Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky offered competing views on how to cut carbon emissions, clean storm water, replenish local water sources and lure more Angelenos out of their cars during a wide-ranging debate on environmental issues. The four competitors invited to Saturday night's debate sponsored by the Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters agreed that whoever replaces Yaroslavsky on the Board of Supervisors should be a strong regional guardian of the environment.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Catherine Saillant
Candidates seeking to replace Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky offered competing views on how to cut carbon emissions, clean storm water, replenish local water sources and lure more Angelenos out of their cars during a wide-ranging debate on environmental issues. The four competitors invited to Saturday night's debate sponsored by the Los Angeles League of Conservation Voters agreed that whoever replaces Yaroslavsky on the Board of Supervisors should be a strong regional guardian of the environment.
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NEWS
November 6, 1992
Results of voting Tuesday on environmental issues. Vote counts are complete or at 97% or higher : APPROVED Alabama: Create Forever Wild program for state to buy, preserve wilderness. Won 82% to 18%. South Dakota: Limit large-scale gold and silver surface mining in Black Hills. Won 57% to 43%. REJECTED Massachusetts: Require recyclable, reusable packaging. Lost 59% to 41%. Excise tax on toxic chemicals, some petroleum products. Lost 59% to 41%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - The leader of the state Senate won bipartisan support Wednesday for a bill that would streamline California's environmental laws. Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) said his measure, which heads next to the Assembly for consideration, is a “work in progress” but said it begins the process of making environmental laws more reasonable. The existing California Environmental Quality Act is  “is a great statute” but “is due for an update after 40 years on the books,” Steinberg told his colleagues before the 39-0 vote to approve SB 731. The bill would allow projects to move forward without duplicative evaluation if they are consistent with local specific plans that have already undergone environmental review.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1989 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The environment is hot. Environmental issues are center stage this weekend at the Paris summit of the world's largest industrial nations. And the environment is a focus of increasing concern among Americans worried about asbestos in their walls and ceilings, contaminants in their soil and Lord-knows-what in their air and water. On a less foreboding level, the environment is hot in financial markets. Fidelity Investments is launching a mutual fund devoted to environmental companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles mayoral and City Council candidates should address air, soil, water and energy problems in their campaigns and the winners should push for specific measures to meet those challenges, UCLA researchers said in a report released Tuesday. The report aims to ignite debate among candidates over their commitment to confronting environmental issues, including constrained water supplies, greenhouse gas emissions and tighter government budgets. "We're hoping that candidate debates from 2013 to 2021 will be loaded with questions derived from our plan," said Mark Gold, associate director of UCLA's Institute of Environment and Sustainability.
NEWS
May 15, 1997
Philip K. Verleger, 78, attorney who specialized in environmental and oil issues. Educated at UC Berkeley and Boalt Hall School of Law, Verleger was a partner in the Los Angeles-based firm McCutchen, Black, Verleger & Shea. He went into semi-retirement in 1990 when the firm merged into Baker & Hostetler. Verleger began his legal career in 1944, practicing admiralty litigation. But within a few years, he moved into air pollution and other environmental issues.
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States and the Soviet Union signed new agreements on Friday to jointly study climate change, ozone depletion, wetlands management, arctic ecology and other environmental concerns, officials announced here. For instance, U.S. scientists soon will board Soviet research vessels to conduct joint atmospheric studies in the South Pacific, EPA Administrator William K. Reilly said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2006 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Norman Banks "Ike" Livermore Jr., a former lumber industry executive with a conservationist's love of the outdoors who became the environmental conscience of California Gov. Ronald Reagan's administration, died of natural causes Tuesday at a hospital near his home in San Rafael, Calif. He was 95. Livermore served from 1967 to 1975 as state secretary for resources, the only member of Gov. Reagan's Cabinet to serve for eight years.
NEWS
April 21, 1988 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
Remember the kind of stuff you did in kindergarten? Probably you ate graham crackers, played in the sandbox, built houses with blocks. What you probably didn't do was learn about environmental issues or global ecology or marine life. You probably thought acid rain was a kind of Brand X shampoo and recycling was riding your bike for a second time. But the kids who attend kindergarten at the Turtle Rock Nature Center in Irvine know about these things, or will at the end of nine months.
SCIENCE
April 22, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Happy Earth Day! It's been 43 years since Wisconsin Sen. Gaylord Nelson celebrated the very first Earth Day on April 22, 1970. It's not yet a federal holiday, but Earth Day is celebrated by schoolkids from coast to coast (along with many adults). Of course, it goes without saying that for some folks, every day is Earth Day. Here are seven things you might not have known about Earth Day (and the spirit of environmentalism it represents): * More than 1 billion people in 192 countries are doing something to mark Earth Day this year, according to estimates from the Earth Day Network . In Veracruz, Mexico, volunteers will clean up beaches to improve the habitat for sea turtles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2013 | By Anthony York
GUANGZHOU, China -- It's easy to feel good traveling through China with Gov. Jerry Brown this week.  Multimillion-dollar business deals between Chinese and California companies have been announced, and cooperation on environmental policy is pledged at every turn from top Communist Party and California officials. At night, the state is celebrated at lavish dinners where the California wine flows freely. Brown says his trip here is a first step toward improved relations between California and China that will be mutually beneficial for both.
WORLD
March 17, 2013 | By John Adams and Sarah Parvini
DUBLIN, Ireland - As the shopkeepers in this capital city readied for St. Patrick's Day under typically intermittent rainy skies, Father Sean McDonagh's attention was on the new pope's agenda. The Columban priest, whose order has a long tradition of missionary work, has been an outspoken critic of Vatican policies. With Pope Francis' honeymoon period underway he, like many, is waiting to see what issues will be at the center of the new papal agenda. McDonagh, 69, believes Francis needs to go green, making environmentalism the No. 1 priority for the Catholic Church.
SCIENCE
December 24, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss
Secretary of State nominee John Kerry, with 20 years of concern about climate change, is expected to push the issue to center stage as a slow-motion crisis in need of a global solution. When he sought to defeat President George W. Bush in 2004, the Democratic senator from Massachusetts made a point of challenging the Bush administration's backtracking on the issue and rejection of climate science. In contrast, he told the nation, he “believes in science.” Kerry has been pushing for action on global warming since he attended the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in 1992.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles mayoral and City Council candidates should address air, soil, water and energy problems in their campaigns and the winners should push for specific measures to meet those challenges, UCLA researchers said in a report released Tuesday. The report aims to ignite debate among candidates over their commitment to confronting environmental issues, including constrained water supplies, greenhouse gas emissions and tighter government budgets. "We're hoping that candidate debates from 2013 to 2021 will be loaded with questions derived from our plan," said Mark Gold, associate director of UCLA's Institute of Environment and Sustainability.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 2012 | By Thomas Curwen and Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
As utility crews raced Tuesday to repair six water main breaks that stretched from the Hollywood Freeway on the east to La Cienega Boulevard on the west, the general manager of the Department of Water and Power stood before the agency's Board of Commissioners and requested a series of steep rate increases over the next two years. Ron Nichols, who first argued for increases last summer, said a 5% water rate hike and a 10.5% electrical hike over two years were critical if the department hoped to comply with environmental mandates, renovate its coastal power plants and accelerate the replacement of water mains throughout the city.
NEWS
July 18, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Greenpeace activists are coming in from the cold, occasionally trading wetsuits for pinstripes to lunch with oil company magnates as well as storm their tankers. "It's the whole strange bedfellows thing," said Kaylee Kreider, 27, past U.S. director of the environmental group's energy campaign, and part of a new generation of activists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1994 | RODRIGO J. PRUDENCIO and MARTIN EDWIN ANDERSEN, Rodrigo J. Prudencio is a trade specialist for the National Wildlife Federation. Martin Edwin Andersen, formerly on the staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, writes about Latin America
The electrifying competitiveness of Mexico's presidential election is but one of the sea-changes transforming public life south of the Rio Grande. This year, for the first time, environmental issues are taking a front rank in the country's political discourse.
OPINION
February 27, 2012 | By Larry B. Stammer
It has long been a maxim that mixing religion and politics can spell trouble. So when Rick Santorum told a partisan crowd in Columbus, Ohio, recently that President Obama's worldview was based on a "phony theology" that drives "radical environmentalists," he must have known his comments would reverberate far beyond his conservative political base. Santorum was speaking of efforts to forestall the worst effects of climate change through controls on greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels, and policies aimed at encouraging the development of renewable sources of energy.
OPINION
October 6, 2011
The question of whether to build an oil pipeline from the tar sands of Alberta, Canada, to refineries in Texas is turning out to be one of the most important political decisions of the year for the Obama administration. It's an agonizing choice because the costs and benefits of building it are so closely balanced; opponents have overstated the environmental risks, and proponents seem oblivious to the consequences of continuing to feed our nation's oil addiction. The Keystone XL pipeline would run 1,700 miles and cost $7 billion, generating thousands of construction jobs.
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