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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1993
If the "Administration Joins Fight For 'Environmental Justice' " (headline, Dec. 7), will that include minorities such as loggers and lumbermen? STUART H. JONES Claremont
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OPINION
August 1, 2013
Re "'Toxic tour' is trash talk and real dirt," July 27 Having served on two statewide environmental boards for five years each, I went on many site visits and tours throughout California. By far the most lasting impact was from the "toxic tour" put on by Communities for a Better Environment. That bus tour through the heavily polluted industrial neighborhoods southeast of Los Angeles taught me the reality of environmental justice (or injustice). After experiencing the tour, my state board worked hard to stop passing the buck from agency to agency; our efforts resulted in the removal in 2004 of the large piles of unsightly concrete and other waste known as "La Montana" from Huntington Park.
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NEWS
August 1, 1994 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Creative, clean and high-tech, it seemed like the sort of entrepreneurial enterprise tailor-made for a California economy in dire need of fresh capital and pollution-free industry. A Los Angeles lawyer with a scientific bent figured out a cheap way to recycle chemicals vital to the manufacture of computer circuitry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2013 | By Hector Becerra, Los Angeles Times
If it's any consolation to Southern California, none of its ZIP Codes claimed the top spot as the state's most polluted, according to a California Environmental Protection Agency report. That dubious distinction went to Fresno. But three of the 10 most pollution-heavy ZIP Codes were in Los Angeles County. The other seven, including Fresno, are in the San Joaquin Valley, according to the nation's first comprehensive statewide environmental health screening tool, called CalEnviroScreen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1997 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications
In February 1994, President Clinton issued an executive order requiring every agency to "make achieving environmental justice part of its mission." Though the order doesn't define environmental justice, it instructs the agencies to identify the effects of their actions on "minority and low-income groups." If there's ever a case that appears to address the good intentions of this order, surely it is that of Shintech and its desires in the great state of Louisiana. Shintech is the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1992 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn writes for the Nation and other publications
The problem with the Earth Summit is that it simulates with eerie fidelity the "global warming" paradigm that forms so large a part of its agenda. High-minded rhetoric becomes trapped under the ceiling of political reality and circulates futilely inside a closed-end system. Overheated expectations generate excessive disappointments. Many people hope that somehow, in some spirit of creative compromise, the Earth Summit will reach agreement on some minimal environmental agenda.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1999 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the weather was hot in her La Puente neighborhood during the 1960s and 1970s, state Sen. Hilda Solis (D-La Puente) remembers the sweet stench coming off the nearby Puente Hills landfill. State Sen. Martha Escutia (D-Whittier) recalls the black freeway dust that settled on the laundry hanging from clotheslines in her East Los Angeles backyard. When her family moved to Huntington Park, she recalled, they endured the smell of animal rendering plants in nearby Vernon.
NEWS
December 7, 1993 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her neighborhood is not a very friendly place, especially if you like to breathe. Even on brisk, breezy days, the fumes from more than a dozen major factories ringing Florence Robinson's middle-class subdivision burn the sinuses and tickle the throat and sometime sicken the stomach. On still, sultry days--and there are many of those--the fumes darken the air and cause respiratory problems for Robinson and many others who live nearby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
California Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris on Thursday ventured into a community known as a "diesel death zone" for its heavy truck pollution and announced her intention to join a lawsuit challenging a massive warehouse project to be built nearby. Harris' visit to smoggy Mira Loma, where thousands of trucks from the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach come to off-load cargo, underlines an aggressive stance on environmental justice issues by the state's highest law enforcement official. On Wednesday, she proposed a $24.5-million settlement with Chevron to resolve allegations that the company failed to properly inspect and maintain underground storage tanks at 650 gas stations statewide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1993 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
As the mayoral race in Los Angeles shifts into high gear, a coalition of leaders from the city's ethnic communities and environmental organizations on Monday called on the 24 candidates to address the "environmental and economic injustices" at the city's urban heart.
NEWS
January 17, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
It's taken decades, but Los Angeles has clawed its way back to passably clean air from smog so opaque that we might have been living, or breathing, in Beijing. But that's just the most visible of pollutants. They're in the ground and they're in the river and ocean water too, sometimes because criminal conduct put them there. Oil spillers, smog-test cheats, midnight solvent dumpers, developers playing illicit lumberjacks or deliberately bulldozing significant species -- they're all out there despoiling L.A. County, which is probably the most environmentally diverse political entity around, with ocean, forests, deserts, mountains,  and some pretty park where you and your kids bike and romp and look at the bugs and plants and critters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
California Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris on Thursday ventured into a community known as a "diesel death zone" for its heavy truck pollution and announced her intention to join a lawsuit challenging a massive warehouse project to be built nearby. Harris' visit to smoggy Mira Loma, where thousands of trucks from the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach come to off-load cargo, underlines an aggressive stance on environmental justice issues by the state's highest law enforcement official. On Wednesday, she proposed a $24.5-million settlement with Chevron to resolve allegations that the company failed to properly inspect and maintain underground storage tanks at 650 gas stations statewide.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2011 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
For more than four decades, a grimy, rough-edged stretch of Branford Street in Pacoima has been known as Dismantler Row: a stronghold of metal recyclers, trucking yards, rock cutters, salvage yards and auto body shops. Oily water streams out of yards each day, fills the cracks and potholes of the street's narrow, asphalt lanes and gushes into storm drains and downstream to the sea. Shops without names hack and hammer at cars in alleyways strewn with discarded tires and trash. Saws and sanders blow granite dust out doors and windows like a white fog. Residents of surrounding neighborhoods have had enough.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 2010 | By Margot Roosevelt
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger directed state public health and environmental officials Friday to visit Kettleman City to conduct "a thorough investigation" into the causes of birth defects in the San Joaquin Valley farming community. Schwarzenegger's intercession comes more than a year after activists petitioned state agencies to investigate whether a large toxic dump near the community might be causing cleft palates and other defects among the mostly low-income Latino residents. The dump, operated by Houston-based Waste Management, is the largest hazardous waste facility west of the Mississippi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday that it plans to investigate a cluster of facial birth defects and other health issues among migrant farm workers in the impoverished California enclave of Kettleman City as part of the Obama administration's pledge to shift the agency's attention toward issues of environmental justice. Residents suspect the facial deformities are linked to a nearby toxic waste dump. The dump is set to be expanded to accommodate waste from large population centers, including Los Angeles, and residents have filed a lawsuit against the Kings County Board of Supervisors challenging its approval of the expansion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2009 | Margot Roosevelt
It is 8:30 a.m. on a Sunday. Along streets of grimy stucco bungalows with bougainvillea, American flags and "Beware of Dog" signs on chain-link fences, a couple of residents are hosing down lawns. It ought to be quiet, but it's not. Behind the garden walls of Astor Avenue, there's a chugging and a hissing and a clanking and a squeaking. Two yellow locomotives, hooked to cars piled high with metal containers, idle on the track of the Union Pacific. Their stacks spew gray plumes of smoke.
NEWS
February 12, 1994 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton on Friday ordered all federal agencies to take steps to lighten what officials called a disproportionate burden on minority communities of pollutants and other environmental hazards. Clinton signed an executive order requiring federal agencies to "make environmental justice a part of all they do." Under the order, fair treatment of minority communities would become a factor in decisions ranging from the regulation of pesticides to the prosecution of polluters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2010 | By Louis Sahagun
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday that it plans to investigate a cluster of facial birth defects and other health issues among migrant farm workers in the impoverished California enclave of Kettleman City as part of the Obama administration's pledge to shift the agency's attention toward issues of environmental justice. Residents suspect the facial deformities are linked to a nearby toxic waste dump. The dump is set to be expanded to accommodate waste from large population centers, including Los Angeles, and residents have filed a lawsuit against the Kings County Board of Supervisors challenging its approval of the expansion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2009 | Elaine Woo
Luke Cole, a leading theorist and practitioner of environmental justice law, who battled toxic waste facilities, mega-dairies, mining companies and other pollution threats in poor and minority communities in California and Alaska, died Saturday in a car crash in Uganda. He was 46. Cole was traveling with his wife on a rural road in western Uganda when a truck hit their vehicle head-on. He died at a clinic a short time later, according to his father, Herbert Cole.
OPINION
August 18, 2005 | Manuel Pastor, Bill Gallegos and Michele Prichard, MANUEL PASTOR is co-director of the Center for Justice, Tolerance and Community at UC Santa Cruz. BILL GALLEGOS is executive director of the statewide Communities for a Better Environment. MICHELE PRICHARD is special projects director with the Liberty Hill Foundation, the coordinating agency for the Southern California Collaborative for Environmental Justice.
THE ENVIRONMENTAL Protection Agency quietly released a draft plan in July on "environmental justice" -- how to deal equitably with the effects of environmental problems on communities of people. But, in fact, the proposed policy ignores race and income -- two main factors -- in identifying areas that need help. The EPA instead takes a sort of "colorblind" approach. That might not be an issue if all communities were equally affected. But they are not.
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