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Environmental Legislation

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1996
When members of Congress return from recess this week, they will confront a stack of land-grab legislation thinly disguised as "environmental reform." Held over from last year, these bills are not unlike the stale remains from a raucous party the previous night--best swept away quickly. Will House leaders do that or will they persist in efforts to breathe legislative life into the reckless ideas and special-interest giveaways that motivate these bills?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2012 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
With legal challenges to the California bullet train mounting, Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday began circulating proposed legislation designed to significantly diminish the possibility that opponents could stop the project with an environmental lawsuit. Brown's office sent the proposal to a group of powerful environmental groups, including the Sierra Club, the Planning Conservation League and the Natural Resources Defense Council, hoping to win their support for the special legal protection.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1991 | JONATHAN H. ADLER, Jonathan H. Adler is an environmental policy analyst with the Competitive Enterprise Institute in Washington
In 1983, the 2,242 residents of Times Beach, Mo., were forcibly evacuated from their homes and relocated by the Environmental Protection Agency. The reason? Ten years earlier, waste oil containing traces of dioxin was used for dust control on Times Beach streets. Even though little was known at the time about the toxicity of dioxin and its potential to cause cancer in humans at low to moderate doses, the EPA ordered the town evacuated and scheduled it for demolition.
WORLD
May 29, 2012 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - The Brazilian government is pressing forward with controversial legislation that critics say will lead to widespread destruction of the Amazon rain forest. After months of heated discussion, President Dilma Rousseff on Monday presented a final version of the bill that was heavily influenced by the country's powerful agricultural lobby. The update to the country's 1965 Forestry Code would reduce both the amount of vegetation landowners must preserve and the future penalties paid for those who currently flout environmental laws.
NEWS
April 12, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Morris K. Udall (D-Ariz.), disabled by injuries complicated by the effects of Parkinson's disease, signaled Thursday that he may resign his seat this month after three decades as one of Congress' most effective and revered legislators. A letter from his wife to Speaker Thomas S. Foley said that Udall was making a "painfully slow" recovery from a bad fall at his home last Jan. 6 and may not be able to resume his duties as he had hoped.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2010 | Mcclatchy Newspapers
Nearly four weeks after losing her bid to unseat Texas Gov. Rick Perry, Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison has abandoned plans to resign from the Senate, saying she intends to serve out her term to fight the growth of the federal government. "For family reasons, I had planned to begin making a transition home to Texas this spring," Hutchison said at a hurriedly called news conference Wednesday in San Antonio. "But it is clear to me that the stakes in our nation's Capitol have never been higher."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2012 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
With legal challenges to the California bullet train mounting, Gov. Jerry Brown on Monday began circulating proposed legislation designed to significantly diminish the possibility that opponents could stop the project with an environmental lawsuit. Brown's office sent the proposal to a group of powerful environmental groups, including the Sierra Club, the Planning Conservation League and the Natural Resources Defense Council, hoping to win their support for the special legal protection.
WORLD
May 29, 2012 | By Vincent Bevins, Los Angeles Times
SAO PAULO, Brazil - The Brazilian government is pressing forward with controversial legislation that critics say will lead to widespread destruction of the Amazon rain forest. After months of heated discussion, President Dilma Rousseff on Monday presented a final version of the bill that was heavily influenced by the country's powerful agricultural lobby. The update to the country's 1965 Forestry Code would reduce both the amount of vegetation landowners must preserve and the future penalties paid for those who currently flout environmental laws.
NEWS
November 6, 1986 | KEITH LOVE, Times Political Writer
He was considered too old, too liberal and very likely to run out of his amazing luck. But on Wednesday he was Alan Cranston the Triumphant, the Democratic senator who bucked his state's Republican trend and vanquished his toughest challenger ever by 116,622 votes. With his victory over Rep. Ed Zschau, a verdict that was not certain until 4 a.m., Cranston is headed toward legend status in California politics.
NEWS
May 23, 1985 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
When he was a child, Denis Hayes, 40, the one-time wunderkind of America's environmental movement, recalls, "Among educated people environment was the thing other than heredity that determined personality." Oh, perhaps one's maiden aunt affected British walking shoes, cooked her vegetables right with Adele Davis and went on weekend hikes with some fringy outfit called the Sierra Club.
NATIONAL
June 24, 2010 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
A congressional stampede to pass oil spill legislation gathered momentum Thursday as a Senate committee voted to impose tougher penalties on water polluters, and lawmakers unveiled a comprehensive bill to strengthen environmental and safety rules on offshore drilling. The measures expected to move forward in the wake of the Deepwater Horizon blowout also include a rewrite of decades-old maritime liability law and a tightening of ethics rules for officials who oversee offshore drilling.
NATIONAL
April 1, 2010 | Mcclatchy Newspapers
Nearly four weeks after losing her bid to unseat Texas Gov. Rick Perry, Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison has abandoned plans to resign from the Senate, saying she intends to serve out her term to fight the growth of the federal government. "For family reasons, I had planned to begin making a transition home to Texas this spring," Hutchison said at a hurriedly called news conference Wednesday in San Antonio. "But it is clear to me that the stakes in our nation's Capitol have never been higher."
NEWS
December 14, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Rep. Morris K. Udall (D-Ariz.), known for his productive environmental stewardship and for the wit that prompted him to title his failure to achieve the nation's highest office "Too Funny to Be President," has died. He was 76. Udall, who represented southern Arizona in Congress from 1961 until 1991, died late Saturday of Parkinson's disease at the U.S. Veterans Medical Center in Washington, D.C. His death was announced in Tucson by the family foundation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1996
When members of Congress return from recess this week, they will confront a stack of land-grab legislation thinly disguised as "environmental reform." Held over from last year, these bills are not unlike the stale remains from a raucous party the previous night--best swept away quickly. Will House leaders do that or will they persist in efforts to breathe legislative life into the reckless ideas and special-interest giveaways that motivate these bills?
NEWS
October 11, 1991 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson signed major environmental protection legislation Thursday empowering the California Coastal Commission to bypass the courts and order a swift halt to prohibited development. The commission sought the additional authority in part because it was unable under existing law to step in quickly enough to prevent developer damage in the exclusive Sweetwater Canyon area of Malibu and up the coast at Big Sur.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 1991 | JONATHAN H. ADLER, Jonathan H. Adler is an environmental policy analyst with the Competitive Enterprise Institute in Washington
In 1983, the 2,242 residents of Times Beach, Mo., were forcibly evacuated from their homes and relocated by the Environmental Protection Agency. The reason? Ten years earlier, waste oil containing traces of dioxin was used for dust control on Times Beach streets. Even though little was known at the time about the toxicity of dioxin and its potential to cause cancer in humans at low to moderate doses, the EPA ordered the town evacuated and scheduled it for demolition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1989 | FRANCIS M. WHEAT, Francis M. Wheat is a Los Angeles lawyer and a trustee of the Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund.
The U.S. Senate, urged by Mark O. Hatfield (R-Ore.) and Brock Adams, (D-Wash.) has adopted an alarming piece of legislation. In a nutshell, the measure would repeal, for parts of the Pacific Northwest, the federal environmental laws that govern the use of lands belonging to the American people.
NEWS
December 14, 1998 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Rep. Morris K. Udall (D-Ariz.), known for his productive environmental stewardship and for the wit that prompted him to title his failure to achieve the nation's highest office "Too Funny to Be President," has died. He was 76. Udall, who represented southern Arizona in Congress from 1961 until 1991, died late Saturday of Parkinson's disease at the U.S. Veterans Medical Center in Washington, D.C. His death was announced in Tucson by the family foundation.
NEWS
April 12, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rep. Morris K. Udall (D-Ariz.), disabled by injuries complicated by the effects of Parkinson's disease, signaled Thursday that he may resign his seat this month after three decades as one of Congress' most effective and revered legislators. A letter from his wife to Speaker Thomas S. Foley said that Udall was making a "painfully slow" recovery from a bad fall at his home last Jan. 6 and may not be able to resume his duties as he had hoped.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1989 | FRANCIS M. WHEAT, Francis M. Wheat is a Los Angeles lawyer and a trustee of the Sierra Club Legal Defense Fund.
The U.S. Senate, urged by Mark O. Hatfield (R-Ore.) and Brock Adams, (D-Wash.) has adopted an alarming piece of legislation. In a nutshell, the measure would repeal, for parts of the Pacific Northwest, the federal environmental laws that govern the use of lands belonging to the American people.
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