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NEWS
April 9, 1993 | Associated Press
Waste, fraud and abuse is one thing. But what's this $75.4-million appropriation for LUST in President Clinton's 1994 budget? There it is on page 55 of the summary of the Environmental Protection Agency's budget: the Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) program. LUST is up this year. Last year's federal budget provided $75 million for it.
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NEWS
April 9, 1993 | Associated Press
Waste, fraud and abuse is one thing. But what's this $75.4-million appropriation for LUST in President Clinton's 1994 budget? There it is on page 55 of the summary of the Environmental Protection Agency's budget: the Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) program. LUST is up this year. Last year's federal budget provided $75 million for it.
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NEWS
November 30, 1995 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House on Wednesday rejected legislation that would cut the Environmental Protection Agency's budget by 22.5%, handing the Republican leadership a new defeat in the politically sensitive environmental arena. The 216-208 vote, which sends the measure back to a committee of House and Senate members for at least minor changes, reflected the difficulty that Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2011 | By Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times
Smog and soot levels have dropped significantly in Southern California over the last decade, but the Los Angeles region still has the highest levels of ozone nationwide, violating federal health standards an average of 137 days a year. The city ranks second in the country, behind Bakersfield, for the highest year-round levels of toxic particles or soot, and fourth in the nation for the number of short-term spikes in soot pollution. The rankings, part of the annual "State of the Air" report by the American Lung Assn., are based on federal and state data, which show that more than 90% of Californians live in counties with unhealthful air. Unlike parts of the East and Midwest, where coal-fired power plants are a primary source of toxic pollution, Southern California's chemical stew is the product of tailpipe emissions from cars and diesel pollution from trucks, trains and ships linked to the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2011 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles times
First the Republicans took over the House. Now it's the cafeterias. Republicans say the use of "compostable" cups and utensils, a key part of former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's Green the Capitol initiative, was "neither cost-effective nor energy-efficient. " So they brought back plastic utensils and foam cups, ditching the eco-friendly dining wares of the Democratic era. The replacement spoons, knives, forks and cups are creating quite a stir, dividing lawmakers largely along party lines.
OPINION
April 22, 2009 | Laura E. Huggins, Laura E. Huggins, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and at the Property and Environment Research Center in Bozeman, Mont., is the author with Terry Anderson of "Greener Than Thou."
Earth Day is upon us, and with it, several "green" events, including the broadcasting of "Walden: The Ballad of Thoreau" on public television and in schools. This is surprising at a time when government involvement in the environment is all the rage. Henry David Thoreau, who wrote that "government is best which governs not at all," is probably writhing in his grave.
NEWS
July 13, 1995 | JANET HOOK and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Republicans on the House Appropriations Committee, instructed by congressional budget-makers to whack federal spending, are turning the belt-tightening process into an opportunity to make far-reaching changes in the way government programs work. Spending bills now beginning to move through the House would do more than make deep cuts in social programs that Democrats and President Clinton hold dear.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1995 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer is a Times contributing editor. He can be reached via e-mail at 76327.1675@compuserve.com
Don't you feel the least bit foolish? You've wasted more than a year of your life obsessing about a celebrity murder. By now, you're an expert on arcane bits of evidence and legal arguments that will never again be relevant. Like any sad couch potato hooked on the soaps, you even managed to convince yourself that the show had serious lessons for the real world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2011 | By Bettina Boxall, Los Angeles Times
The House spending bill passed last month wouldn't just chop $60 billion from the federal budget ? it seeks to cut a broad swath through environmental regulation. From fish protections in California to water pollution limits in Florida and regulation of greenhouse gas emissions nationwide, environmental programs were targets of the Republican budget resolution, which appears to have been as much about setting a political agenda as about deficit reduction. Democrats have promised to block the environmental and other cuts in the Senate, where they hold a slim majority, and President Obama has raised the threat of a veto, making it unlikely that many of the hits in the proposal will survive.
NEWS
September 25, 1995 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL REPORTER
From the time of Theodore Roosevelt to the Administration of Richard Nixon, environmentalism was an idea embraced by Republicans. The first President to make conservation a national goal, Roosevelt gave legitimacy to the notion that America's forests and wilderness belong to all citizens--not just to a few powerful interests. Seventy years later, the Nixon Administration took the philosophy further, extending federal protection to air, water and endangered plants and animals.
NEWS
July 28, 1995 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving toward a vision of a smaller, less powerful federal government, the conservative-led Congress has opened debate on legislation to dismantle the edifice of housing, environmental and other social programs that touch the lives of millions of Americans.
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