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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1996
The tone and content of Alexander Cockburn's Aug. 2 Column Left inevitably leads one to the conclusion that he couldn't stand the objectivity of Times reporter Frank Clifford's article (July 25) on the effort to resolve the controversy surrounding the Headwaters forest in Northern California. For starters, and as the false and misleading crux of his entire premise, he misidentifies the Headwaters forest. Cockburn should have known that the same Environmental Protection Information Center that he twice mentions in 1990 defined the Headwaters forest, in its own ballot initiative, as approximately 3,000 acres.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 1996
The tone and content of Alexander Cockburn's Aug. 2 Column Left inevitably leads one to the conclusion that he couldn't stand the objectivity of Times reporter Frank Clifford's article (July 25) on the effort to resolve the controversy surrounding the Headwaters forest in Northern California. For starters, and as the false and misleading crux of his entire premise, he misidentifies the Headwaters forest. Cockburn should have known that the same Environmental Protection Information Center that he twice mentions in 1990 defined the Headwaters forest, in its own ballot initiative, as approximately 3,000 acres.
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NEWS
January 27, 1990 | MARK STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The setting is Spartan: A single, unheated room in a metal industrial building shared by a grimy radiator-repair shop in a forgotten town in the middle of the woods. Do not be fooled by the modest headquarters of the Environmental Protection Information Center. The relatively small group has had an impact on California as big as its name.
NEWS
January 27, 1990 | MARK STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The setting is Spartan: A single, unheated room in a metal industrial building shared by a grimy radiator-repair shop in a forgotten town in the middle of the woods. Do not be fooled by the modest headquarters of the Environmental Protection Information Center. The relatively small group has had an impact on California as big as its name.
NEWS
April 27, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
A temporary restraining order halting clear-cut harvesting of old-growth trees on 700 acres 30 miles southeast of Eureka was issued Tuesday by Humboldt County Superior Court Judge John Buffington. Pending a hearing next week, the Pacific Lumber Co. will halt work at two locations. The harvest plans were challenged on environmental grounds in a legal action filed by the Environmental Protection Information Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
Seven logging protesters will face trial in Humboldt County on trespassing charges after some of them last week locked themselves to a 55-gallon drum full of concrete, blocking a road in Carlotta and holding up logging trucks. The trials are set for Dec. 6.
NEWS
December 21, 1988
A judge has blocked Pacific Lumber Co. from disturbing a 230-acre Humboldt County stand of virgin redwoods and Douglas fir, despite state approval of the company's logging plans. Eureka Superior Court Judge William Ferrogiaro ruled that there was ample evidence that harvesting at the site 20 miles southeast of Eureka would harm wildlife and the watershed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Environmental groups sued the U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Department of Agriculture Secretary Anne Veneman over cattle grazing along the North Fork Eel River in Northern California. The Center for Biological Diversity and the Environmental Protection Information Center filed the suit Monday in federal court to stop cattle grazing in the river corridor. The groups contend that cows cross the river, causing algae blooms and impairing water quality and fish habitat.
NEWS
July 3, 1987 | Special to The Times
Faced with a lawsuit challenging its clear-cutting of virgin redwood forests, Pacific Lumber Co. has acknowledged mistakes in its timber-harvest plans and has temporarily withdrawn two of them from consideration. The decision was made in a hearing Wednesday before Del Norte County Superior Court Judge Frank S. Petersen, who had been asked by environmentalists to temporarily restrain Pacific Lumber from cutting any more trees until its harvest plans were reviewed.
NEWS
April 17, 1993 | Associated Press
An environmental group sued state and federal agencies Friday, saying they had allowed Pacific Lumber Co. to ravage an old-growth Humboldt County forest inhabited by a threatened sea bird. The U.S. District Court suit by the Environmental Protection Information Center also accuses Pacific Lumber of knowingly violating federal and state endangered-species laws that protect the marbled murrelet. The suit mainly involves federal actions taken under the Bush Administration last year.
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