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NEWS
March 27, 2001 | From the Washington Post
A week before President Bush broke his campaign pledge to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, Environmental Protection Agency chief Christie Whitman warned him that he must demonstrate his commitment to cutting greenhouse gases or risk undermining the United States' standing among its allies around the world.
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NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - The Environmental Protection Agency took the first step Friday toward possibly halting construction of the largest open-pit mine in North America, declaring that Alaska's Bristol Bay - home to the most productive sockeye salmon fishery on Earth - must be protected. "Extensive scientific study has given us ample reason to believe that the Pebble Mine would likely have significant and irreversible negative impacts on the Bristol Bay watershed and its abundant salmon fisheries," EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy told reporters Friday morning.
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SCIENCE
November 25, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Monday appointed Francesca Grifo as the agency's official in charge of scientific integrity. In addition to overseeing the scientific integrity program, Grifo will chair an internal committee that deals with issues of standards, transparency and scientific freedom. In 2009 President Obama issued a directive that ordered federal agencies to refocus on science and remove political pressure from science policy. The EPA, which incorporates scientific analysis into its regulations, frequently comes under fire for decisions opposed by industry and challenged by other scientists.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - The largest open-pit mine in North America, proposed for Alaska's wild and remote Bristol Bay region, would have a devastating effect on the world's biggest sockeye salmon fishery and the Alaska Natives and fishermen who depend on it, according to a federal report released Wednesday. After completing three years of scientific study, conducting eight hearings and sifting through more than a million public comments, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency concluded that the proposed Pebble Mine could destroy up to 94 miles of streams where salmon spawn and migrate and up to 5,350 acres of wetlands, ponds and lakes.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
The Environmental Protection Agency said it planned to regulate wastewater discharged by companies producing natural gas from shale formations, including chemically laced water used in a controversial extraction process known as hydraulic fracturing. The EPA's initiative comes as water-intensive natural gas production has spread around the country, raising concerns about the effects on drinking-water supplies. The practice, also known as fracking, involves shooting water infused with chemicals and sand at high pressure into shale formations to unlock reservoirs of natural gas. The EPA will try to determine what to do with water used during fracking, as well as water that is already underground and flows back up the well.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1990 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Environmental Protection Agency, in a decision that could spark another serious trade battle between Europe and the United States, disclosed Friday that it will maintain a ban against imported wines that contain traces of a chemical fungicide. The ruling, which is expected to block imports of certain wines for at least another year, affects as much as 20% of all potential imports of French wine and lesser amounts of wine from Italy and Spain, U.S. health officials said.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration announced a new air pollution standard Friday that would bring about a 20% reduction in microscopic particles of soot emitted by coal-fired power plants and diesel vehicles that contribute to haze and respiratory ailments. The new limit, fought by industry and welcomed by environmentalists, marks the first time the Environmental Protection Agency tightened the soot standard since it was established 15 years ago. "These standards are fulfilling the promise of the Clean Air Act," said EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson.
OPINION
March 26, 2011
The damage caused by mercury in our air and water is no secret. The neurotoxin is especially dangerous to young children and developing fetuses, and is so pervasive that pregnant women are warned to limit the amount of swordfish and albacore tuna they eat. (The mercury levels in these and certain other fish are particularly high.) It's also no secret where most of the mercury released into the environment comes from: coal-fired power plants. Yet this country has been waiting nearly two decades for the Environmental Protection Agency to propose regulations for reducing mercury emissions.
BUSINESS
March 4, 2009 | Roger Vincent
Los Angeles commercial property landlords are going green on a bigger scale than their counterparts in other cities, the federal Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday. The EPA awarded the most Energy Star ratings in the country last year to Los Angeles, where 262 buildings earned the agency's conservation designation. Energy Star buildings use at least 35% less energy than average buildings and emit 35% less carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.
NATIONAL
February 28, 2014 | By Maria L. La Ganga
SEATTLE - The Environmental Protection Agency took the first step Friday toward possibly halting construction of the largest open-pit mine in North America, declaring that Alaska's Bristol Bay - home to the most productive sockeye salmon fishery on Earth - must be protected. "Extensive scientific study has given us ample reason to believe that the Pebble Mine would likely have significant and irreversible negative impacts on the Bristol Bay watershed and its abundant salmon fisheries," EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy told reporters Friday morning.
SCIENCE
November 25, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Monday appointed Francesca Grifo as the agency's official in charge of scientific integrity. In addition to overseeing the scientific integrity program, Grifo will chair an internal committee that deals with issues of standards, transparency and scientific freedom. In 2009 President Obama issued a directive that ordered federal agencies to refocus on science and remove political pressure from science policy. The EPA, which incorporates scientific analysis into its regulations, frequently comes under fire for decisions opposed by industry and challenged by other scientists.
NATIONAL
July 18, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - President Obama's revamped second-term Cabinet is nearly complete after the Senate on Thursday confirmed two of the longest-stalled nominees. Votes to approve Thomas E. Perez as Labor secretary and Gina McCarthy as administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency quickly followed a deal to end a showdown over executive branch nominations. The 59-40 vote on McCarthy came 133 days after the Senate received her nomination, the longest delay of any Cabinet-level nomination this year.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2013 | By Neela Banerjee and Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - After President Obama finished his inaugural speech Monday, Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Beverly Hills) thanked him for mentioning climate change, a topic environmentalists said Obama had avoided during much of his first term. "I did more than mention climate change," the president told Waxman. In discussing the urgency of climate change before a national audience, the president elevated the issue into the top tier of second-term priorities that include fiscal reform, gun control and immigration reform.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2012 | By Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration announced a new air pollution standard Friday that would bring about a 20% reduction in microscopic particles of soot emitted by coal-fired power plants and diesel vehicles that contribute to haze and respiratory ailments. The new limit, fought by industry and welcomed by environmentalists, marks the first time the Environmental Protection Agency tightened the soot standard since it was established 15 years ago. "These standards are fulfilling the promise of the Clean Air Act," said EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson.
NATIONAL
October 21, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
The Environmental Protection Agency said it planned to regulate wastewater discharged by companies producing natural gas from shale formations, including chemically laced water used in a controversial extraction process known as hydraulic fracturing. The EPA's initiative comes as water-intensive natural gas production has spread around the country, raising concerns about the effects on drinking-water supplies. The practice, also known as fracking, involves shooting water infused with chemicals and sand at high pressure into shale formations to unlock reservoirs of natural gas. The EPA will try to determine what to do with water used during fracking, as well as water that is already underground and flows back up the well.
NEWS
April 8, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli, James Oliphant, Lisa Mascaro and Kathleen Hennessey, Washington Bureau
Congressional negotiators struck a last-minute deal to fund the government for the rest of the fiscal year, congressional leaders and the White House said late Friday, averting a threatened shutdown. The House and Senate are expected to approve a seven-day stopgap measure to keep the government running until the final details of the agreement can be worked out. Talks continued deep into the evening until, finally, House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) met with his caucus to outline the details of the proposed compromise, one in which Republicans succeeded in securing nearly $38 billion in cuts from current spending levels.
NEWS
January 12, 1994 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving closer to a showdown with the federal Environmental Protection Agency, a legislative committee on Tuesday approved an overhaul of the California automobile Smog Check program that falls short of federal demands. The action occurred only four days after the sudden collapse of talks between California and federal officials aimed at devising a compromise that would enable California to comply with U.S. clean air standards and avert a threatened loss of federal transportation funds.
REAL ESTATE
August 30, 1992 | ANTHONY GIORGIANNI, THE HARTFORD COURANT
After Halina Marston placed a new carpet pad under an area rug in her Southington, Conn., home last October, she and her husband noticed a strong chemical odor. The same day, her husband began complaining about irritation in one eye, the same in which he had had a corneal transplant years earlier. Even though Marston aired the pad outdoors for two days, the odor remained. Concerned about potential health effects, she returned the pad to the store. She also complained to state consumer officials.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2011 | By Neela Banerjee, Washington Bureau
The Obama administration and its Senate allies beat back a months-long drive by congressional Republicans to strip the Environmental Protection Agency of its ability to regulate greenhouse gases, the heat-trapping emissions that most scientists believe are the main contributor to global climate change. The Republican effort has focused on limiting the EPA's regulatory powers and its program to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from vehicles, power plants and oil refineries, the biggest emitters of greenhouse gases.
OPINION
March 26, 2011
The damage caused by mercury in our air and water is no secret. The neurotoxin is especially dangerous to young children and developing fetuses, and is so pervasive that pregnant women are warned to limit the amount of swordfish and albacore tuna they eat. (The mercury levels in these and certain other fish are particularly high.) It's also no secret where most of the mercury released into the environment comes from: coal-fired power plants. Yet this country has been waiting nearly two decades for the Environmental Protection Agency to propose regulations for reducing mercury emissions.
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