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Environmentalists Women

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1998 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
She was both L.A.'s first female environmentalist and a passionate advocate of property rights, waging a bitter battle to preserve a slender stretch of Malibu coastline years before conservation became a cocktail party byword. For her efforts, May Knight Rindge--the indomitable "Queen of Malibu"--was variously labeled an eccentric, a hopeless idealist and, by many, a troublemaker.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1998 | CECILIA RASMUSSEN
She was both L.A.'s first female environmentalist and a passionate advocate of property rights, waging a bitter battle to preserve a slender stretch of Malibu coastline years before conservation became a cocktail party byword. For her efforts, May Knight Rindge--the indomitable "Queen of Malibu"--was variously labeled an eccentric, a hopeless idealist and, by many, a troublemaker.
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NEWS
February 6, 1995 | GEORGE SKELTON
If there's one lesson we've all learned--and relearned--it is to never, ever count out Willie Brown. Save the political obit. He's a Lazarus. Practically nothing seems impossible anymore for this Houdini after having finessed his way back into the Speaker's office with just 39 Democratic votes in an 80-member house. But Willie Brown, governor? "I'm going to clearly have (running for) governor as an option (in 1998)," he says. "Absolutely."
NEWS
February 12, 1989 | SOLL SUSSMAN, Associated Press
The forces that fought the free-trade agreement with the United States say they have no intention of giving up on the issue despite their election loss to Prime Minister Brian Mulroney. "There is a continuing trade agenda before us," Tony Clark, director of the Pro-Canada Network, said in an interview. "I think it boils down to how much more political and economic depending can Canada take on the greatest economic power in the world."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2009 | Noel Murray
What Just Happened Magnolia, $29.98; Blu-ray, $34.98 In the Barry Levinson-directed, Art Linson-penned, inside-Hollywood comedy, Robert De Niro plays a put-upon movie producer -- not unlike Linson himself -- who over the course of a week on the job has to deal with a star who refuses to shave his beard, an ex-wife who might be sleeping with his best friend, and a director who's sabotaged a blockbuster by including a scene of a dog getting shot.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1987 | ERIC MANN, Eric Ann is a union organizer and the author of "Taking on General Motors," which is to be published this fall.
In today's labor movement, debates that have long taken place behind closed doors are finally becoming more open as a declining union movement is forced to look for new answers. For a union official to be for "jobs" is like a politician being for motherhood, but some union officials are asking "jobs at what cost?" and the even more heretical question, should "jobs" always be labor's primary objective?
NATIONAL
October 6, 2010 | By Matea Gold, Tribune Washington Bureau
Over beers in June at the Hawk 'n' Dove, a Capitol Hill bar, two veteran Democratic strategists commiserated about how few Democratic groups were taking advantage of a recent Supreme Court ruling that allows unlimited corporate and union political spending. They decided to form a new political action committee to counter plans by Republican-affiliated operations to flood races around the country with resources. "We said, 'Let's give it a shot,'" said Jim Jordan, one of the strategists.
NEWS
December 22, 1985 | FRANK CLIFFORD, Times Staff Writer
The campaign on behalf of the California Supreme Court is facing a dilemma as interest groups representing labor, the environment, women and minorities have begun spreading the message that the court is good for their causes. These organizations are responding to a torrent of court criticism generated by groups of prosecutors, peace officers, agribusiness lobbyists and conservative politicians who argue that the court is soft on crime and biased against business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2002 | Mark Z. Barabak, Times Staff Writer
Ask Mary Ann Boddum about the race for California governor and she goes on at length about Bill Simon Jr.: his inconsistent stands on issues, his questionable business practices, lack of personal integrity and bumbling campaign. "I just don't think he's suited for the job," Boddum said of the GOP gubernatorial nominee. She is scarcely more impressed with the Democratic incumbent, Gray Davis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 1993 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and RON RUSSELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sweeping past their challengers in Tuesday's elections, longtime Los Angeles City Councilmen Zev Yaroslavsky and Marvin Braude easily won four more years at City Hall. Fueled by the power of the incumbency and a flood of special-interest campaign contributions, Yaroslavsky won a sixth term on the council and Braude an eighth term. Both council districts straddle the Santa Monica Mountains, including portions of the San Fernando Valley and the Westside.
NEWS
December 21, 1992 | PAUL RICHTER and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President-elect Bill Clinton has chosen utility executive Hazel O'Leary to be his energy secretary and former South Carolina Gov. Richard W. Riley to head the Education Department, sources said Sunday. The selections will be announced at a noon PST press conference today and will bring Clinton closer to his goal of choosing his top 25 Administration officials before Christmas. More announcements are due Tuesday and Wednesday.
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