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Enzymes

NEWS
December 14, 1995 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Neuroscientists report they have developed the first effective emergency therapy for stroke, an advance that could prevent as many as 44,000 Americans a year from becoming disabled. The treatment involves intravenous injection of the clot-dissolving enzyme t-PA--the same enzyme used to treat clots in the heart--into patients within three hours after the onset of stroke symptoms.
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NEWS
December 23, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
In a finding that opens the door to the development of less toxic, more effective anti-cancer drugs, and perhaps to new drugs to prevent aging, researchers at a Northern California company have discovered that virtually all human tumors contain a unique enzyme that blocks the biological clocks of tumor cells, allowing them to grow and proliferate virtually forever.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Researchers have found a way to use the language of life itself--the spiral string of DNA curled inside every living cell--to solve a difficult math problem, suggesting that one day a working computer could be crafted in a test tube. USC computer expert Leonard M. Adleman used the genetic code to program an elementary equation into a unique DNA molecule.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1994 | LINUS CHUA
La Jolla-based Agouron Pharmaceuticals said Friday that it has discovered the three-dimensional structure of an enzyme crucial to a family of viruses that cause the common cold. Though the biotechnology company is years away from a marketable product based on its finding, Agouron's share price jumped 18% after the announcement. In Nasdaq trading, its stock closed at $14.75, up $2.25.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1992 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
An enzyme that acts on the male hormone testosterone may play a role in the development of prostate cancer and lead to new approaches in the prevention and treatment of the disease, according to a new USC study. The researchers found that native Japanese men, who have some of the lowest rates of prostate cancer in the world, have far less activity of the enzyme than black Americans, who have one of the highest rates of the cancer.
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | DONALD SMITH, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
We have met the enemy, and it has six legs. In the Battle of Southern California, it was the tiny poinsettia white fly that devastated the region's fall vegetable crops--the latest struggle in the long-running war between humans and insects over food. The news from the front is not all good. "I guess the insects are winning," concedes Douglass R. Miller, head of research for the Systematic Entomology Laboratory at the U.S. Agriculture Department's research center here.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1992 | DENISE HAMILTON
When President Bush spoke of excellence in education during his State of the Union address, he might have been talking about Anna Belle Kim of Monterey Park, who this week was named one of 40 finalists in the Westinghouse Science Talent Search. Anna, 17, a senior at Alhambra High School, cloned a human enzyme believed to cause heart damage when it reacts with chemotherapy drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1991 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blood samples taken at the scene of a beach shooting last month match that of Henry Hubbard Jr., the San Diego police officer charged in the attack, the district attorney's office said Thursday. During a court hearing for Hubbard, a 4 1/2-year veteran of the department charged with attempted murder and attempted robbery, the prosecutor in the case also said that the blood of one of the victims matches that found on Hubbard after his arrest for the attack at Torrey Pines State Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1991 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A team of San Diego scientists has discovered the three-dimensional structure of a protein found in every human cell, which they believe could lead to customized drugs to battle a range of diseases from cancer to cholera, according to a study released today. The structure of this particular enzyme is regarded by biochemists as the scientific equivalent of a Rosetta stone for the kinases family of proteins, which play a crucial messenger role in functions as diverse as energy release and memory.
NEWS
April 9, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration said Monday it has approved the first drug treatment for Gaucher's disease, a rare metabolic disorder that causes anemia and enlargement of the liver and spleen. The disease afflicts an estimated 10,000 to 15,000 people in the United States, of whom about 2,000 to 3,000 need treatment. Symptoms include fatigue, a grossly distended abdomen, fragile and painful bones and vulnerability to bruising and bleeding.
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