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Epidemics

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NEWS
January 29, 1991
Doctors and aid agency experts from France and Jordan said Baghdad residents could face disease from POOR SANITATION AND DIRTY WATER in the aftermath of bombing raids on the Iraqi capital. Intestinal epidemics like TYPHOID or CHOLERA could occur among Baghdad's 4.5-million population, they said. Many residents fled to provincial areas before the war, and others stocked up on food and bottled water. Government officials and medical experts say they have no evidence so far of epidemic.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
A California congresswoman has announced plans to introduce federal legislation to toughen laws against what she called an epidemic of sexual assault on college campuses. In an appearance at UC Berkeley last week, Rep. Jackie Speier (D-Hillsborough) said she would press for more aggressive action against sexual assault with increased funding for federal investigators, annual campus surveys and more comprehensive data on the outcomes of cases. She also said she would seek to require universities to interview students who file complaints of sexual misconduct, addressing widespread concerns about inadequate investigations.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1986
Anne C. Roark's article (Feb. 23), "AIDS Adds to History of Epidemics," presents us with a picture of AIDS as no more than the most recent of a long line of epidemic diseases--leprosy (the Antonine plague of ancient Rome), cholera, syphilis, and, in our century, influenza and polio. Like these diseases, so Roark would have us think, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (1) is highly contagious, (2) is of unknown cause, and (3) produces the "need to mythologize disease" to explain the seemingly unexplainable.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
John Corigliano wrote his Symphony No. 1 in 1988 on a grand scale for an extravagant-sized orchestra. It is a multi-colored score containing a patchwork quilt of immense emotions. The composer didn't call it a war symphony, but that is what it is, an epic orchestral score for an epic tragedy, the AIDS epidemic. Audiences and orchestras, devastated by what the disease had wrought, understood. The symphony was needed, appreciated and widely played. The urgency of those times is receding into memory, and Corigliano's score is not so much heard any longer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1989 | ANNE C. ROARK, Times Staff Writer
A Santa Monica nurse calls this year's version of the flu the Darth Vader of respiratory diseases. A hospital librarian says it made her sicker than she has been since college. An emergency room doctor in Pasadena says it's the worst she's seen in 13 years. Given all the coughing and misery in Southern California in the last few weeks, it may come as a surprise, particularly to flu sufferers, that there is no epidemic of the disease in Los Angeles this year.
NEWS
December 17, 1988 | Associated Press
France has been hit with its worst flu epidemic in 20 years, and by Christmas, one in five people will have suffered from high fever, aching bones, stuffy nose and other unpleasant flu symptoms, doctors say.
WORLD
August 7, 2002 | From Reuters
At least 200 people have died of encephalitis in the last two weeks in India's northeastern Assam state, the state health minister said Tuesday. Assam was hit by devastating floods in the middle of July, and many parts of the state remain waterlogged, creating the breeding conditions for the mosquitoes that spread the disease. More than 600 people suffering from the brain inflammation are packed into hospitals throughout the state, Assam Health Minister Bhumidhar Burman said.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | Reuters
The Venezuelan Health Ministry said Tuesday that an epidemic of dengue, a mosquito-borne tropical fever, has killed 23 people over the last 10 days and that 222 other cases are being treated.
NEWS
April 25, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A cholera epidemic in drought-hit southern Somalia has killed hundreds of people, including at least 80 in the last three days, health officials said. They said 50 people had died in and around the towns of Dinsor and Qansahdhere in the Bay region. Nearly 400 deaths had been recorded in the area in the last two weeks. In nearby Bardera, 30 people have died in the last three days, district commissioner Mohamud Abdi Takuul said. Officials said many more people might have died in remote villages.
NEWS
January 31, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The worst may be over for a flu strain that quickly spread fever, hacking coughs and death across the country. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta said that the number of states reporting widespread cases has started to drop. The flu was flourishing in 38 states by the middle of December, but only 31 states are reporting widespread cases now, the CDC said.
OPINION
February 14, 2014 | By Sam Quinones
The death of Philip Seymour Hoffman last week, apparently of a heroin overdose, says a lot about the epidemic of opiate abuse gripping the United States. That epidemic, which I've spent the last year researching for a forthcoming book, is rooted in a 20-year revolution in medicine that has resulted in far wider prescribing of opiates. Narcotic painkillers are now prescribed for chronic back and knee pain, fibromyalgia, headaches, arthritis and other ailments. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, consumption of these opioids has risen 300% since 1999, making them the most prescribed class of medicines in America.
NEWS
February 3, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
The death of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman is bringing attention to the growing use of heroin in the U.S. as well as an alarming rise in drug-overdose deaths. The cause of death for Hoffman, found in his apartment Sunday, isn't official, but police say officers found packets of heroin near his body and a hypodermic needle in his arm. Hundreds of thousands in the U.S. are turning to the drug in increasing numbers.  It's at "epidemic proportions," a Drug Enforcement Administration spokesman told the L.A. Times.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports a 102% increase in fatal overdoses from 1999 to 2010.  Check out our graphic below, which shows how the availability of the drug has increased in the United States over the last several years.  Follow me at @AmyTheHub
OPINION
December 29, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In 1963, the Supreme Court established a rule of evidence that is now well known to viewers of television courtroom dramas. In Brady vs. Maryland, it held that prosecutors must turn over to defense attorneys evidence favorable to the accused and "material either to guilt or punishment. " But prosecutors, including in Los Angeles, have complied grudgingly with the Brady rule. Some have ignored it altogether. Now a respected federal appeals court judge has warned of "an epidemic of Brady violations abroad in the land.
OPINION
November 15, 2013 | By Adam Sobel and Naomi Oreskes
At the U.N. climate negotiations in Warsaw on Monday, the lead Philippine delegate, Yeb Sano, made an emotional plea: "Typhoons such as Haiyan and its impacts represent a sobering reminder to the international community that we cannot afford to procrastinate on climate action. " But was Sano's statement consistent with the science? Most of the scientists who have been asked that question in recent days have replied with dutiful statements that sound like "no. " No single event can be attributed to climate change.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
For the last several years, Swedish music company Epidemic Sound has been building a vast library of tracks for producers to use in soundtracks on television shows and online video, amassing 20,000 pieces from more than 100 composers. Now, the company is launching in the United States through a partnership with Maker Studios, which operates some of the biggest video channels on YouTube. “We really want to be the kings of background music," Epidemic Chief Executive Oscar Höglund said.
OPINION
October 15, 2013 | By H. Gilbert Welch
Similar populations living in different regions of the United States get exposed to wildly different amounts of medical care. If that sounds like an old story, it is. It's now four decades old. But it is an important story to reflect on as we consider the path forward for our medical care system. In the late 1960s, a nephrologist trained in epidemiology was sent to Burlington, Vt., to run the state's regional medical program. The program was part of the Lyndon B. Johnson administration's effort to bring the advances of modern medicine to all parts of the nation.
NEWS
April 19, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 1,200 Zimbabweans are dying each week from AIDS, President Robert Mugabe said, acknowledging for the first time the enormity of an epidemic whose existence the government previously had underplayed. In a speech marking the 19th anniversary of Zimbabwe's independence, Mugabe said a national AIDS council would be formed to unite all sectors of the nation against the epidemic.
NEWS
February 5, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Influenza outbreaks are occurring in 44 states, and deaths from flu and pneumonia are epidemic, federal health officials said. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said 44 states, the District of Columbia and New York City reported regional or widespread flu activity during the week ended Jan. 24, the latest period for which figures are available. Flu and pneumonia deaths in a sampling of 122 cities were at epidemic levels.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Larry Kramer's "The Normal Heart" holds such an important place in the history of the AIDS epidemic, chronicling the stark early days, indicting the government for its inaction and challenging audiences to transform grief into activism, that it took me decades to appreciate the personal drama. The 2011 Broadway revival, directed by Joel Grey and George C. Wolfe and starring Joe Mantello as grass-roots crusader Ned Weeks, made devastatingly clear that beneath the agitprop was an emotionally searing character study.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Three decades ago, when so many of his friends were dying of AIDS, Stephen Crohn wondered why he - a gay man whose longtime companion had been one of the first to die from the disease--had managed to avoid it. Was it just a matter of time before he caught the human immunodeficiency virus that causes AIDS? Was there something wrong with the HIV antibody tests he took that always came back negative? Crohn, an artist and freelance editor, lived with the questions for 14 years before he finally learned the answer was in his genes.
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