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Epilepsy

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SPORTS
October 23, 1998 | JEFF GOTTLIEB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olympic sprint champion Florence Griffith Joyner died after suffering an epileptic seizure, according to autopsy results released Thursday, and her family and friends say they hope the findings will put to rest rumors that drug use contributed to her death. Griffith Joyner died last month in her sleep at age 38. Her husband, Al Joyner, bitterly criticized those who suggested that she took performance-enhancing drugs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | By Frederick N. Rasmussen
Dr. John M. Freeman, a longtime Johns Hopkins University pediatric neurologist and medical ethicist who was known as an expert in pediatric epilepsy, died Jan. 3 of cardiovascular disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He was 80. His death was announced by Johns Hopkins. Dr. Freeman's iconoclastic questioning of established medical practices revolutionized the treatment of pediatric epilepsy and became the hallmark of his work. He became a forceful advocate of two long-abandoned therapies - one that required a strict, unconventional high-fat ketogenic diet known as KD, the other involving surgery to remove half of the brain of children who were tormented by unremitting epileptic seizures - which led to their revival and current acceptance as effective treatments.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2012 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
She could speak only with her eyes. But Lia Lee's life bridged worlds and changed American medicine. Lia, the subject of Anne Fadiman's 1997 book "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down," died Aug. 31 in Sacramento at the age of 30, after living decades longer than doctors said was possible. The immediate cause was pneumonia, although it was epilepsy and sepsis, a toxic reaction to infection, that had left her in a vegetative state for much of her life. "Medicine couldn't have kept her alive.
SPORTS
December 29, 2013 | Chris Foster
Paris Hundley is protective, very protective, when it comes to her brother, UCLA quarterback Brett Hundley. "I know he looks like a big and bad football player, but my brother, he's like a cute baby," says Paris, who at 21 is a year older. When they were kids, Paris handled life's hardships with a don't-tread-on-him motto. For example, she recalls finding young Brett angry and near tears at a skating rink. "His fists were in a ball and he was upset," Hundley said. "A girl had hit him. Brett could never hit a girl.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
British researchers have determined that a little-studied chemical in the cannabis plant could lead to effective treatments for epilepsy, with few to no side effects. The team at Britain's University of Reading, working with GW Pharmaceuticals and Otsuka Pharmaceuticals, tested cannabidivarin, or CBDV, in rats and mice afflicted with six types of epilepsy and found it “strongly suppressed seizures” without causing the uncontrollable shaking and other side effects of existing anti-epilepsy drugs.
HEALTH
November 10, 2008 | Valerie Ulene, Ulene is a board-certified specialist in preventive medicine practicing in Los Angeles.
Seizures are frightening, sometimes surreal, experiences for people who have them -- and for observers. Perhaps it's because seizures come on unexpectedly or that they produce such unusual symptoms. It's certainly not because they're uncommon. Roughly 1 in 100 people experience recurrent seizures, a condition commonly known as epilepsy, according to a study released in August by the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
HEALTH
June 30, 2003 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
For years, a small but vocal group of doctors has argued that surgery may be the best way to treat some cases of epilepsy. But the procedure is drastic -- requiring the removal of a walnut-sized piece of the brain -- and many other experts have remained uneasy about the idea.
NEWS
June 30, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
Pregnant women who take valproate sodium, a widely used psychiatric and epilepsy medication (sold under the commercial names Depakote, Depakene and Depacon) run a higher risk than women who take other anti-seizure drugs that the child exposed in utero to the medication will suffer developmental delays, the FDA warned Thursday. The medication, used to control seizures and migraine headaches and in treatment of bipolar disorder and other psychiatric illnesses, is one of four epilepsy medications, including carbamazepine (Tegretol or Carbatrol)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Lil Wayne wants to set the record straight about his seizures: He has epilepsy. The rapper called in to radio station Power 106 on Thursday to discuss his new album, "I Am Not a Human Being II," and to address concerns raised when he had a series of seizures two weeks ago. His trip to the ICU at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, coupled with a lack of info from Camp Weezy and a TMZ story that had him in a medically induced coma, getting his...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | By Frederick N. Rasmussen
Dr. John M. Freeman, a longtime Johns Hopkins University pediatric neurologist and medical ethicist who was known as an expert in pediatric epilepsy, died Jan. 3 of cardiovascular disease at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore. He was 80. His death was announced by Johns Hopkins. Dr. Freeman's iconoclastic questioning of established medical practices revolutionized the treatment of pediatric epilepsy and became the hallmark of his work. He became a forceful advocate of two long-abandoned therapies - one that required a strict, unconventional high-fat ketogenic diet known as KD, the other involving surgery to remove half of the brain of children who were tormented by unremitting epileptic seizures - which led to their revival and current acceptance as effective treatments.
SPORTS
October 26, 2013 | By Mike Hiserman
Minnesota seems to have found a winning combination with defensive coordinator Tracy Claeys running things from the sideline and head coach Jerry Kill watching from the booth and giving inspirational - even prophetic - speeches. Kill has epilepsy, and he has been on medical leave since having the fifth game-day seizure of his career, before the Gophers played Michigan on Oct 5. After getting routed by the Wolverines, 42-13, Minnesota had a week off to regroup before playing at Northwestern.
SPORTS
September 25, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
It never ceases to amaze how sports can become a morality play, and take so many wrong and disgusting turns along the way. Take the case of the football coach of the University of Minnesota Golden Gophers, Jerry Kill. Kill has epilepsy. He has had four seizures during games, including one Sept. 14. He is 52, has worked his way through the highly competitive world of college football to earn a job in the prestigious Big Ten, is in his third season, has beaten cancer, has beaten the four teams he has played this season, and now has to beat the perception that he should step down because of his epilepsy.
SCIENCE
April 24, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Pregnant women who took the anti-seizure drug valproate during pregnancy increased the odds that their baby would have autism, and were roughly twice as likely to give birth to a child who would go on to be diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder, according to a large study that captured 10 years of births in Denmark. Valproate, often known by its commercial name Depakote, is widely prescribed in the treatment of epilepsy and a wide range of psychiatric conditions. It is one of a class of drugs that has been linked to a child's delayed cognitive development and to some congenital malformations.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Lil Wayne wants to set the record straight about his seizures: He has epilepsy. The rapper called in to radio station Power 106 on Thursday to discuss his new album, "I Am Not a Human Being II," and to address concerns raised when he had a series of seizures two weeks ago. His trip to the ICU at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, coupled with a lack of info from Camp Weezy and a TMZ story that had him in a medically induced coma, getting his...
NEWS
December 7, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn
President Obama's longtime campaign advisor David Axelrod put his money where his mouth is -- or slightly above it to be more accurate -- having his trademark mustache shaved off on live TV this morning, making good on a pledge to raise $1 million for epilepsy research. Axelrod, who'd already offered up his lip spinach as a wager once before -- vowing to shave it off if Obama didn't carry the electoral votes in Pennsylvania, Minnesota or Michigan -- had promised to shave it off in exchange for $1 million in donations to CURE (Citizens United for Research in Epilepsy)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2012 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
She could speak only with her eyes. But Lia Lee's life bridged worlds and changed American medicine. Lia, the subject of Anne Fadiman's 1997 book "The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down," died Aug. 31 in Sacramento at the age of 30, after living decades longer than doctors said was possible. The immediate cause was pneumonia, although it was epilepsy and sepsis, a toxic reaction to infection, that had left her in a vegetative state for much of her life. "Medicine couldn't have kept her alive.
NEWS
August 3, 1993 | Associated Press
The first new epilepsy drug in more than 10 years was approved by the Food and Drug Administration on Monday. The drug, felbamate, will be prescribed to prevent partial seizures in adults. It was also approved for use to treat a rare form of epilepsy in children known as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. About 2.5 million Americans have epilepsy and 125,000 new patients are found to have the disease each year. Wallace Laboratories of Cranbury, N.J., will market the new drug under the brand name
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
MODESTO - Topamax. Depakote. Phenobarbital. The list goes on. Before Jayden David turned 5, he had tried a dozen powerful medications to tame a rare form of epilepsy. The side effects were devastating. There were grand mal seizures that lasted more than an hour. Hundreds of times a day, muscle twitches contorted his impish face. "If he wasn't sleeping, he was seizing," said Jayden's father, Jason David. PHOTOS: Treating son's epilepsy Feeling helpless, David said, he contemplated suicide.
NEWS
September 14, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
British researchers have determined that a little-studied chemical in the cannabis plant could lead to effective treatments for epilepsy, with few to no side effects. The team at Britain's University of Reading, working with GW Pharmaceuticals and Otsuka Pharmaceuticals, tested cannabidivarin, or CBDV, in rats and mice afflicted with six types of epilepsy and found it “strongly suppressed seizures” without causing the uncontrollable shaking and other side effects of existing anti-epilepsy drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2012 | By Lee Romney, Los Angeles Times
MODESTO - Topamax. Depakote. Phenobarbital. The list goes on. Before Jayden David turned 5, he had tried a dozen powerful medications to tame a rare form of epilepsy. The side effects were devastating. There were grand mal seizures that lasted more than an hour. Hundreds of times a day, muscle twitches contorted his impish face. "If he wasn't sleeping, he was seizing," said Jayden's father, Jason David. PHOTOS: Treating son's epilepsy Feeling helpless, David said, he contemplated suicide.
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