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ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By David Ng
Sunday's episode of "Downton Abbey" on PBS featured a guest appearance by one of opera's biggest living talents: Dame Kiri Te Kanawa. The New Zealand-born soprano played Dame Nellie Melba, an actual opera singer who hailed from Australia and whose career spanned the late 19th and early 20th centuries. "Downton" portrays Melba as a guest performer of the Crawley household, serenading the family after dinner with the aria "O Mio Babbino, Caro" from Puccini's opera "Gianni Schicchi.
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NEWS
June 8, 2012 | By Amy Dawes, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's a two-minute scene of comedy, poignancy and fleeting connection at the heart of a Season 3 episode of "Modern Family,"and for actor Ed O'Neillit exemplifies what the ABC ensemble series does best. In the "Virgin Territories" episode, sensitive lawyer Mitchell (Jesse Tyler Ferguson) and his burly, masculine dad, Jay (O'Neill), are at the country club. Over a couple of beers, Mitch has revealed that his dad never actually sank the celebrated hole-in-one that landed him the nickname "Ace" years ago (as a bored teenager, Mitch had kicked his dad's golf ball into the hole to keep things moving)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2012 | By Todd VanDerWerff
The title of this midseason finale of “Breaking Bad” - “Gliding Over All” - is a fairly big hint as to where the episode ends. It is, after all, a Walt Whitman quote, and Whitman is one of the few tangible pieces of evidence that could connect Walter White to the criminal empire he's built in the mind of his brother-in-law, the one who always overlooks him because, hey, who's going to suspect Walter? Yet as the episode reached its climax and Hank picked up the copy of “Leaves Of Grass” that would draw a direct line between Walter and the long-dead Gale Boetticher, everything snapped into place in a beautiful, elegant way. If last week's episode strained for that feeling of pieces you always knew would snap into place actually doing so here and there, this week's was a moody, contemplative piece of work that pulls Walter back from the edge just enough to make it all the more tragic when his hubris does him in yet again.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
David Morrissey has cast a wide shadow over "The Walking Dead" in its third season as the much anticipated villainous leader known as the Governor. While the character is a sinister presence with a black eye patch and a closet full of zombie heads, Morrissey in real life is upbeat and chatty as he talks from rainy London, which is his home. In Sunday's episode, "Arrow in the Door," Morrissey's Governor finally had a sit-down with his arch nemesis, Rick, played by Andrew Lincoln.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Jennifer Ouellette
Things get small - really small - in this week's episode of " Cosmos ," which tackles the unseen universe at the atomic scale, from the teeming ecosystem inside a single dewdrop and the intricate machinery inside a plant's cells, to the subatomic particles at the heart of a giant exploding star. Carl Sagan famously observed that we are made of star stuff, but that star stuff in turn is made of atoms - the fundamental building blocks of nature - and there are more atoms in the human eye than there are stars in the known universe, according to our host, the Collection of Atoms Known as Neil de Grasse Tyson.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2013 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Amy Sherman-Palladino is trying to get a scene just right. She is directing the season finale of her show "Bunheads," an episode that could determine whether the ABC Family network returns the series for a second season. "Bunheads" is a sweet drama about a Las Vegas chorus girl starting over in a small town by teaching ballet. Sherman-Palladino, a classically trained dancer turned television writer, is trying to start over too. The pivotal scene of this episode, which airs Monday night, is being filmed on location in Hollywood.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Diane English
In response to Jonah Goldberg's Op-Ed on Tuesday, " The wisdom of Dan Quayle ": What? It's been 20 years since the Murphy Brown-Dan Quayle feud, and we're still talking about this? I suppose I should be flattered. And not surprised. After all, we're still talking about glass ceilings and Roe vs. Wade and what constitutes "legitimate rape. " But because history, like a hit television series, repeats itself, let's revisit 1992.  For those of you too young to remember (or too old to recall)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By David Ng
How do you punish Springfield's ultimate grade-school delinquent? A 10-year-old troublemaker who has been disciplined hundreds of times over the last 24 years? In Sunday's episode of "The Simpsons" on Fox, Bart is sentenced to the harshest form of pre-pubescent spirit crushing: classical-music lessons. The severity cannot be underestimated. After rejecting sliding-whistle lessons from Sideshow Mel, sitar instruction from Comicbook Guy and a theremin odyssey courtesy of Prof. Frink, Bart agrees to piano lessons after he espies the attractive Russian teacher Zhenya (the voice of Jane Krakowski)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of March 24 - 30, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SERIES NCIS An investigation of a murder on a Navy ship lead's to McGee's (Sean Murray) estranged father (Jamey Sheridan, pictured) as a suspect in this new episode. 8 p.m. CBS The Voice Blind auditions continue. 8 p.m. NBC Hell's Kitchen Olympic athletes Maurice Greene, Natalie Coughlin and Danell Leyva help Ramsay lead a 3K race in this new episode .8 p.m. Fox Tavis Smiley Reports This new episode "Education Under Arrest" explores the connection between the juvenile justice system and the drop-out rate of American teenagers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2013 | By Todd VanDerWerff
“Breaking Bad” is the story of Walter White. That seems obvious, of course. Bryan Cranston is at the center of nearly every episode, and he's the guy who's won three Emmys for his work as its lead character. But where many TV shows that run five seasons expand and expand, incorporating a larger understanding of their own worlds, “Breaking Bad” has honed itself to a fine point. As other stories and characters fall by the wayside, as all of his excuses and rationales prove hollow and false, there's still Walter White, sitting alone in a cabin in the New Hampshire woods, with two copies of “Mr.
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