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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin, Los Angeles Times
On a chilly morning at Santa Clarita Studios, the cast and crew of ABC Family's "Switched at Birth" are about to tape a scene at an outdoor carwash. It is not quiet on the set. A creaky cart rattles past. Rubber cables swoosh as they're dragged along the concrete. A hiss comes from the hot-coffee dispenser at craft services. In the distance, a car engine starts up. The collective sprightly chatter of milling crew members rises, then falls as a call for calm goes out. The director, in a North Face jacket and wool cap, shouts, "Action!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2008 | Jon Caramanica, Caramanica is a freelance writer.
Arrogance no longer holds David Caruso's face taut. When CBS' "CSI: Miami" premiered six years ago, it hinged on the swagger of Caruso, who had left "NYPD Blue" some years before in an attempt to become a film star, only to find himself back in blue. But the years have weathered his character, Horatio Caine, to the point now where even his signature moves -- the removing and replacing of his sunglasses, the blunt puns so mercilessly mocked in any number of YouTube mash-ups -- lack their original luster.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Television is an unusually fluid art. Because a TV series exists in time, over time, change and revision are in its blood. It's as if painters went back to work on their paintings after they were hung in museums. Series of films or books based on repeating characters also evolve - Sean Connery, meet Daniel Craig - but their progress is relatively glacial. TV series are fruit flies by comparison, mutating not just from season to season but week to week. The inauspiciously titled "Family Tools," which premieres Wednesday on ABC, is based on a middling British series called "White Van Man. " On the basis of its pilot episode, taken alone, I might have warned you to be out of the house Wednesday night in case you might see it even by accident.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Dan Harmon was unceremoniously dumped from his NBC comedy series "Community" after the end of last season, but he apparently bears no ill will toward the people who are keeping the series going. And for the first time, he's discussing publicly the source of his feud with star Chevy Chase. On Wednesday, Harmon participated in one of Reddit's "IAma" Q&As, in which people from various walks of life answer reader questions. Of the dispute with Chase, which resulted in Harmon swearing at the star during the "Community" wrap party and playing angry voicemails from Chase in front of an audience, Harmon wrote: WATCH: Fall 2012 TV previews "He refused to do the "tag" for the Digital Estate Planning episode (the 8 bit video game episode)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Scott Timberg
When telling a tale that includes centuries of endurance, moments of triumph, bursts of humor and sudden, unspeakable atrocities, what's the right tone with which to articulate it all? That's the trick historian Simon Schama had to figure out in his new documentary, "The Story of the Jews," which begins in the Middle Eastern desert about 3,000 years ago and tracks up to the more-or-less present. The program, in five hourlong parts, broadcasts on PBS on Tuesday and April 1. "I wanted to say, without putting on a ridiculous smiley face or making light of the tragic aspects, that there is a story to be told beyond one clearly framed by the assumption of catastrophe," the British historian said in Pasadena.
NEWS
June 15, 2012 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Loyal viewers of "Breaking Bad"know that we bid adios to drug kingpin Gus Fring in "Face Off,"the final episode of the series' slow burn of a fourth season (and anyone not yet up to that episode should quit reading now). Series creator Vince Gilligan and his writing team had effectively, and with great reluctance, signed El Pollo Hermano's death warrant a year earlier in the Season 3 finale. Series protagonist Walter White (Bryan Cranston) had defied Gus, and with egos this big clashing, Gilligan says, "it's like the tagline from 'Highlander': There can be only one. " The chess game between the two strong-willed, controlling men played out over the course of the season's 13 episodes with the meticulous Gus (Giancarlo Esposito)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
The series finale of “Burn Notice” will air on Thursday night, and when it ends so will the life of one of the show's main characters. That's all USA will say in advance of the highly anticipated episode titled “Reckoning.” The show follows the dangerous adventures of burned spy Michael Westen (Jeffrey Donovan) and his rag-tag group of spy friends as they use their super-human detection skills to solve mysteries and crack international cases. At the core of the show is its humanity as Westen negotiates his difficult relationship with his troubled mother Madeline, played by Sharon Gless.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2013 | By Joe Flint
CBS' acclaimed legal drama "The Good Wife" will have multiple partners in syndication. Reruns of the Sunday night program, which stars Julianna Margulies, have been sold by CBS to Amazon's Prime Instant Video platform as well as the Hallmark Channel and local TV stations. Hulu Plus, the subscription arm of the online video service, will also get episodes as part of a previous deal with CBS.  The unique agreement could mean an even longer life on CBS for "The Good Wife," which wraps up its fourth season next month.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2013 | By Todd VanDerWerff
“Breaking Bad” is the story of Walter White. That seems obvious, of course. Bryan Cranston is at the center of nearly every episode, and he's the guy who's won three Emmys for his work as its lead character. But where many TV shows that run five seasons expand and expand, incorporating a larger understanding of their own worlds, “Breaking Bad” has honed itself to a fine point. As other stories and characters fall by the wayside, as all of his excuses and rationales prove hollow and false, there's still Walter White, sitting alone in a cabin in the New Hampshire woods, with two copies of “Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Calming would-be suicide bombers, negotiating a hostage crisis, throwing herself into a sniper's cross hairs, sniffing out CIA coverups and finding out her most trusted employee is a brainwashed killer beholden to her ruthless father: Just another day on the job for Olivia Pope. It's a testament to the complete insanity of “Scandal” that “Mrs. Smith Goes to Washington” -- in which a mild-mannered Midwestern mom wanders into her representative's office on Capital Hill wearing an explosive vest at the exact same moment an intruder barges into the White House -- is probably the most restrained episode we've seen so far in Season 3. Now, don't get me wrong, this was still a fun-filled hour of television.
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