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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2008 | Jon Caramanica, Caramanica is a freelance writer.
Arrogance no longer holds David Caruso's face taut. When CBS' "CSI: Miami" premiered six years ago, it hinged on the swagger of Caruso, who had left "NYPD Blue" some years before in an attempt to become a film star, only to find himself back in blue. But the years have weathered his character, Horatio Caine, to the point now where even his signature moves -- the removing and replacing of his sunglasses, the blunt puns so mercilessly mocked in any number of YouTube mash-ups -- lack their original luster.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Television is an unusually fluid art. Because a TV series exists in time, over time, change and revision are in its blood. It's as if painters went back to work on their paintings after they were hung in museums. Series of films or books based on repeating characters also evolve - Sean Connery, meet Daniel Craig - but their progress is relatively glacial. TV series are fruit flies by comparison, mutating not just from season to season but week to week. The inauspiciously titled "Family Tools," which premieres Wednesday on ABC, is based on a middling British series called "White Van Man. " On the basis of its pilot episode, taken alone, I might have warned you to be out of the house Wednesday night in case you might see it even by accident.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2014 | By Scott Timberg
When telling a tale that includes centuries of endurance, moments of triumph, bursts of humor and sudden, unspeakable atrocities, what's the right tone with which to articulate it all? That's the trick historian Simon Schama had to figure out in his new documentary, "The Story of the Jews," which begins in the Middle Eastern desert about 3,000 years ago and tracks up to the more-or-less present. The program, in five hourlong parts, broadcasts on PBS on Tuesday and April 1. "I wanted to say, without putting on a ridiculous smiley face or making light of the tragic aspects, that there is a story to be told beyond one clearly framed by the assumption of catastrophe," the British historian said in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 2014 | By David Ng
Sunday's episode of "Downton Abbey" on PBS featured a guest appearance by one of opera's biggest living talents: Dame Kiri Te Kanawa. The New Zealand-born soprano played Dame Nellie Melba, an actual opera singer who hailed from Australia and whose career spanned the late 19th and early 20th centuries. "Downton" portrays Melba as a guest performer of the Crawley household, serenading the family after dinner with the aria "O Mio Babbino, Caro" from Puccini's opera "Gianni Schicchi.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
"Love Thy Neighbor," which premiered Wednesday and is Tyler Perry's second contribution to the oeuvre of OWN, revolves around a shrill, invective-spewing granny and the family she delights in continually abusing. It is a comedy, and to ensure that the television audience understands that comedies exist to make people laugh, Perry has thoughtfully and thoroughly seeded it with a laugh track so intrusive it becomes a character in itself. Most of the show's attempts at humor spring from an emotionally abusive little old lady -- her full name is Hattie Mae Love (Patrice Lovely)
BUSINESS
December 31, 2011 | Meg James
"Community," NBC's quirky Thursday night comedy, has been a slacker in the ratings. The sitcom about misfit community college students, starring Joel McHale and Chevy Chase, has averaged about 4 million viewers an episode this season, not enough to guarantee survival in the dog-eat-dog world of network television. The tepid ratings prompted NBC to put the show on hiatus. Still, despite its struggles, the series is headed toward the promised land of syndication. Just a few years ago, a syndication sale for a modest performer like "Community" would have been unthinkable.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of Sept. 29 - Oct. 5, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SERIES Revolution Rachel and her father (Elizabeth Mitchell, Stephen Collins) try to revive Aaron (Zak Orth) in this new episode. 8 p.m. NBC Arrow This special episode recaps the events that led billionaire Oliver Queen (Stephen Amell) to become a vigilante.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Diane English
In response to Jonah Goldberg's Op-Ed on Tuesday, " The wisdom of Dan Quayle ": What? It's been 20 years since the Murphy Brown-Dan Quayle feud, and we're still talking about this? I suppose I should be flattered. And not surprised. After all, we're still talking about glass ceilings and Roe vs. Wade and what constitutes "legitimate rape. " But because history, like a hit television series, repeats itself, let's revisit 1992.  For those of you too young to remember (or too old to recall)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Dan Harmon was unceremoniously dumped from his NBC comedy series "Community" after the end of last season, but he apparently bears no ill will toward the people who are keeping the series going. And for the first time, he's discussing publicly the source of his feud with star Chevy Chase. On Wednesday, Harmon participated in one of Reddit's "IAma" Q&As, in which people from various walks of life answer reader questions. Of the dispute with Chase, which resulted in Harmon swearing at the star during the "Community" wrap party and playing angry voicemails from Chase in front of an audience, Harmon wrote: WATCH: Fall 2012 TV previews "He refused to do the "tag" for the Digital Estate Planning episode (the 8 bit video game episode)
NEWS
February 22, 2014 | By Alexandra Le Tellier
If you think Lena Dunham's nudity in “Girls” is a revolutionary act because her body doesn't conform to Hollywood's skin-and-bones-and-boobs ideal (and I do!), then you really have to give her props for taking that unapologetic attitude about her figure to another level in last week's episode of “Girls.” Dunham's character, Hannah Horvath, is often seen in various states of undress, but those scenes usually take place in the privacy of her apartment. In this episode , however, we rarely see her fully clothed.
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