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BUSINESS
February 4, 2012 | By Ben Fritz and Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Like most fresh faces that arrive in Hollywood, Netflix wanted to be a movie star. But now it's learning what many in Tinseltown have known for decades: Movies are sexy, but the real money is in television. Launched in 1997 with a goal of eliminating the drive to the video store, Netflix Inc. became a hit with consumers and helped push the movie rental chain Blockbuster into bankruptcy. By charging customers a small monthly fee for unlimited DVDs by mail, then expanding into Internet streaming in 2007, it amassed almost 25 million subscribers in the U.S. and in 2011 had revenue of $3.2 billion.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2014 | By Jennifer Ouellette
Things get small - really small - in this week's episode of " Cosmos ," which tackles the unseen universe at the atomic scale, from the teeming ecosystem inside a single dewdrop and the intricate machinery inside a plant's cells, to the subatomic particles at the heart of a giant exploding star. Carl Sagan famously observed that we are made of star stuff, but that star stuff in turn is made of atoms - the fundamental building blocks of nature - and there are more atoms in the human eye than there are stars in the known universe, according to our host, the Collection of Atoms Known as Neil de Grasse Tyson.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 2011 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
If British comedian Rowan Atkinson had any doubts about his international appeal, they've been put to rest by stories he keeps hearing from English aid workers returning from trips to Africa. "They go to these African villages where there are four thatched huts," said Atkinson, 56. "There is nobody in any of them except one, where the entire village is crammed in there. There's a tiny black-and-white TV set being powered by a car battery, and there's a 'Mr. Bean' VHS tape being played.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012
Robert Redford Before his superstar days, Redford appear in the Oct. 20, 1961, episode, "First-Class Mouliak," directed by William Conrad of "Cannon" fame Sam Peckinpah "The Wild Bunch" director cut his teeth in TV. He directed the "Mon Petit Chou" episode that aired Nov. 24, 1961, with guest Lee Marvin Boris Karloff Karloff joined fellow movie monsters Lon Chaney Jr. and Peter Lorre in the "Lizard's Leg and Owlet's...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of Sept. 29 - Oct. 5, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SERIES Revolution Rachel and her father (Elizabeth Mitchell, Stephen Collins) try to revive Aaron (Zak Orth) in this new episode. 8 p.m. NBC Arrow This special episode recaps the events that led billionaire Oliver Queen (Stephen Amell) to become a vigilante.
BUSINESS
December 31, 2011 | Meg James
"Community," NBC's quirky Thursday night comedy, has been a slacker in the ratings. The sitcom about misfit community college students, starring Joel McHale and Chevy Chase, has averaged about 4 million viewers an episode this season, not enough to guarantee survival in the dog-eat-dog world of network television. The tepid ratings prompted NBC to put the show on hiatus. Still, despite its struggles, the series is headed toward the promised land of syndication. Just a few years ago, a syndication sale for a modest performer like "Community" would have been unthinkable.
NEWS
January 10, 1988
The Dec. 15 episode of "thirtysomething" was really something! And every one of the previous shows was also well thought out and acted. Milton F. Zimmerman, Pacific Palisades
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2012 | By Greg Braxton
The fifth season finale of FX's outlaw motorcycle gang drama "Sons of Anarchy", which aired Tuesday night, scored one of its biggest audiences, cementing its status as one of TV's most elite and popular dramas. The episode of the series, which is the cable network's top-rated show, drew 4.67 million viewers -- its highest rated finale ever and the third-most watched episode ever. While longtime fans expressed enthusiasm over the numerous twists, turns and betrayals in the episode, some also noted that the level of graphic, horrific violence reached new heights this season, rivaling Martin Scorsese movies or other critically acclaimed series such as "Breaking Bad" and "Boardwalk Empire".
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Neal Marlens and Carol Black, the creators of ABC's "The Wonder Years," had plenty of time last season to hand-craft each episode of the nostalgic comedy, which reminisces about life in suburbia circa 1968 through the eyes of a 12-year-old boy. After all, there were only six episodes. The run was short but sweet--the show won favorable reviews, was picked up for fall and netted an Emmy Award as the season's best comedy series.
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