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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2012 | By Todd VanDerWerff
The title of this midseason finale of “Breaking Bad” - “Gliding Over All” - is a fairly big hint as to where the episode ends. It is, after all, a Walt Whitman quote, and Whitman is one of the few tangible pieces of evidence that could connect Walter White to the criminal empire he's built in the mind of his brother-in-law, the one who always overlooks him because, hey, who's going to suspect Walter? Yet as the episode reached its climax and Hank picked up the copy of “Leaves Of Grass” that would draw a direct line between Walter and the long-dead Gale Boetticher, everything snapped into place in a beautiful, elegant way. If last week's episode strained for that feeling of pieces you always knew would snap into place actually doing so here and there, this week's was a moody, contemplative piece of work that pulls Walter back from the edge just enough to make it all the more tragic when his hubris does him in yet again.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2012 | By Greg Braxton
The fifth season finale of FX's outlaw motorcycle gang drama "Sons of Anarchy", which aired Tuesday night, scored one of its biggest audiences, cementing its status as one of TV's most elite and popular dramas. The episode of the series, which is the cable network's top-rated show, drew 4.67 million viewers -- its highest rated finale ever and the third-most watched episode ever. While longtime fans expressed enthusiasm over the numerous twists, turns and betrayals in the episode, some also noted that the level of graphic, horrific violence reached new heights this season, rivaling Martin Scorsese movies or other critically acclaimed series such as "Breaking Bad" and "Boardwalk Empire".
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2013 | By Todd VanDerWerff
“Breaking Bad” is the story of Walter White. That seems obvious, of course. Bryan Cranston is at the center of nearly every episode, and he's the guy who's won three Emmys for his work as its lead character. But where many TV shows that run five seasons expand and expand, incorporating a larger understanding of their own worlds, “Breaking Bad” has honed itself to a fine point. As other stories and characters fall by the wayside, as all of his excuses and rationales prove hollow and false, there's still Walter White, sitting alone in a cabin in the New Hampshire woods, with two copies of “Mr.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Diane English
In response to Jonah Goldberg's Op-Ed on Tuesday, " The wisdom of Dan Quayle ": What? It's been 20 years since the Murphy Brown-Dan Quayle feud, and we're still talking about this? I suppose I should be flattered. And not surprised. After all, we're still talking about glass ceilings and Roe vs. Wade and what constitutes "legitimate rape. " But because history, like a hit television series, repeats itself, let's revisit 1992.  For those of you too young to remember (or too old to recall)
BUSINESS
December 31, 2011 | Meg James
"Community," NBC's quirky Thursday night comedy, has been a slacker in the ratings. The sitcom about misfit community college students, starring Joel McHale and Chevy Chase, has averaged about 4 million viewers an episode this season, not enough to guarantee survival in the dog-eat-dog world of network television. The tepid ratings prompted NBC to put the show on hiatus. Still, despite its struggles, the series is headed toward the promised land of syndication. Just a few years ago, a syndication sale for a modest performer like "Community" would have been unthinkable.
NEWS
June 26, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald
The new "Insane Coaster Wars" coming to the Travel Channel this summer lets viewers take a virtual ride on many of the best roller coasters in the United States right from the comfort of their living room couch. PHOTOS: 24 rides competing in "Insane Coaster Wars" Premiering at 9 p.m. on July 8, each themed half-hour episode will let viewers vote online for their favorite coasters in six categories: speed, height, G-forces, inversions, wooden coasters and suspended coasters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Mary McNamara
"Love Thy Neighbor," which premiered Wednesday and is Tyler Perry's second contribution to the oeuvre of OWN, revolves around a shrill, invective-spewing granny and the family she delights in continually abusing. It is a comedy, and to ensure that the television audience understands that comedies exist to make people laugh, Perry has thoughtfully and thoroughly seeded it with a laugh track so intrusive it becomes a character in itself. Most of the show's attempts at humor spring from an emotionally abusive little old lady -- her full name is Hattie Mae Love (Patrice Lovely)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2012
Robert Redford Before his superstar days, Redford appear in the Oct. 20, 1961, episode, "First-Class Mouliak," directed by William Conrad of "Cannon" fame Sam Peckinpah "The Wild Bunch" director cut his teeth in TV. He directed the "Mon Petit Chou" episode that aired Nov. 24, 1961, with guest Lee Marvin Boris Karloff Karloff joined fellow movie monsters Lon Chaney Jr. and Peter Lorre in the "Lizard's Leg and Owlet's...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 2013 | By Ed Stockly
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of Sept. 29 - Oct. 5, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     SERIES Revolution Rachel and her father (Elizabeth Mitchell, Stephen Collins) try to revive Aaron (Zak Orth) in this new episode. 8 p.m. NBC Arrow This special episode recaps the events that led billionaire Oliver Queen (Stephen Amell) to become a vigilante.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Unlike many a modern filmmaker, compelled to excavate the intimate and even mundane for life's meaning, German director Werner Herzog believes in extremes. During his impressively prolific career, he has consistently sought out the outcasts and the heroes, the misfits and prophets, the dreamers of fevered and spectacular dreams. The subjects of his 25 feature-length documentaries include a deaf and blind woman, a freestyle mountain climber, the lone survivor of an airplane crash and a man who lived with grizzlies.
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