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BUSINESS
June 7, 1989 | BARRY STAVRO, Times Staff Writer
The phone calls start coming in at 6 a.m. at Amgen's headquarters in Thousand Oaks. Since Thursday, when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration gave Amgen the go-ahead to sell its new biotechnology drug called erythropoietin (EPO), there have been more than 1,000 calls from doctors, patients and drug distributors who all want to know when they are going to get their hands on the new drug. EPO, which treats chronic anemia in patients with kidney disease, is "the most important development since dialysis" in treating kidney disease, says Dr. Allen Nissenson, a professor at the UCLA school of medicine.
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SPORTS
August 2, 2013 | Lance Pugmire
Major League Baseball Drug testing began: March 2003. Biggest catches: Ryan Braun (65-game suspension), Manny Ramirez (50 games), Melky Cabrera (50 games), Rafael Palmeiro, Jason Grimsley. Plus more than 30 minor leaguers and free agents in 2012. Drugs of choice: Testosterone (increases strength, speeds recovery after workouts); Adderall (attention-deficit stimulant). Strengths: In 2012, did 5,136 random drug tests (3,955 urine, 1,181 blood tests) on players. Seven tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs, 11 for stimulants.
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BUSINESS
June 2, 1989 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
One morning before dawn aboutseven years ago, George Rathmann drove to his office in a Thousand Oaks industrial park to catch up on his work. Rathmann, chairman of Amgen Inc., noticed that the lights were on in one of the biotechnology company's laboratories and concluded that a careless worker had forgotten to shut them off. So he strolled over to the building to do it himself. But inside the laboratory, Rathmann recalled, was Fu-Kuen Lin, a Taiwan-born scientist with a Ph.D.
SPORTS
January 18, 2013 | By David Wharton and Lance Pugmire
There were no tears or emotional pleas for forgiveness. Instead, an oddly calm - and occasionally smiling - Lance Armstrong ducked few questions before a national television audience on Thursday night, admitting that he used performance-enhancing drugs throughout his storied cycling career. His confession ended years of often angry denials. "I view this situation as one big lie that I repeated a lot of times," he said, explaining that he used a litany of banned substances while winning seven Tour de France races.
SPORTS
March 26, 2004 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
A Sacramento cyclist on Thursday became the first U.S. athlete to be suspended from competition because of a positive test for the synthetic hormone EPO. Adam Sbeih, 30, the 2003 U.S. champion in the 4,000-meter individual pursuit, tested positive for the banned performance-enhancing substance Aug. 26 at the U.S. Cycling Federation's elite track national competition at Trexlertown, Pa. He was suspended for two years from the date of the test and forfeits his results from that meet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Eugene Goldwasser, the biochemist who isolated and purified the anti- anemia protein erythropoietin ? arguably the most important biological drug since insulin ? died Friday at his home in Chicago of kidney failure associated with prostate cancer. He was 88. Erythropoietin, commonly known as EPO, was one of the first blockbuster drugs of the biotechnology industry and was the foundation for the success of Amgen of Thousand Oaks. Yet neither the University of Chicago, where Goldwasser isolated the drug, nor the National Institutes of Health, which funded his work, chose to patent the discovery, and Goldwasser himself never got around to it. "One percent of 1% of the drug's annual revenues would have funded my lab quite handsomely," he later reflected.
SPORTS
May 19, 2011 | By Diane Pucin
Olympic cycling gold-medal winner Tyler Hamilton, who served a two-year suspension for doping, detailed for CBS' "60 Minutes" how he, Lance Armstrong and other members of the U.S. Postal Service team used banned substances. Armstrong, who won a record seven Tour de France races, is being investigated by Jeff Novitzky, the federal prosecutor who spearheaded an examination of BALCO, the laboratory that allegedly supplied baseball star Barry Bonds with steroids. In the "60 Minutes" interview, part of which was aired on the "CBS Evening News" broadcast Thursday, Hamilton says team members used several banned substances, including EPO and testosterone.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1989 | BARRY STAVRO, Times Staff Writer
Amgen's stock climbed Wednesday in heavy trading on rumors that the Thousand Oaks biotechnology company would receive Food and Drug Administration approval today to sell its promising anti-anemia drug erythropoietin. Amgen's stock rose $1.625 to close at $40.125 on volume of 462,000 shares traded on the NASDAQ System. Analysts have estimated the eventual size of the domestic market for EPO at $450 million to more than $1 billion a year. Richard Bock, biotechnology analyst for Sutro & Co., said the widespread rumor Wednesday was that FDA approval of EPO was imminent and "judging by the price action on Amgen, that's what is most likely."
BUSINESS
May 9, 1989 | BARRY STAVRO, Times Staff Writer
The drug comes by mail order, a clear liquid packed in slender ampules, then carefully insulated in dry ice. The package begins a 6,500-mile journey from a pharmacy in Switzerland, travels by Swissair to Boston's Logan Airport and, after being loaded onto a Federal Express jet, is flown to a medical clinic in Pasadena. There, Warren Bacon, 72, who suffers from kidney disease, gets injections of a new biotechnology drug called erythropoietin (EPO) that has helped transform his life.
BUSINESS
May 9, 1989 | BARRY STAVRO, Times Staff Writer
The drug comes by mail order, a clear liquid in slender ampuls, carefully packed in dry ice. The precious cargo begins its 6,500-mile journey from a pharmacy in Switzerland, travels bySwissair to Boston's Logan Airport and from there takes its final hop by Federal Express to a medical clinic in Pasadena. There, Warren Bacon, 72, who suffers from kidney disease, gets injections of a new biotechnology drug called erythropoietin that has helped transform his life. His wife, Nita, said that before the three-times-a-week treatments began in February her husband "never had any energy.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
In a sit-down interview with Oprah Winfrey that aired Thursday night on Winfrey's OWN channel, Lance Armstrong admitted to using banned substances, including the hormone EPO and testosterone, to win his seven straight Tour De France races in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Oprah Winfrey wasted no time getting straight answers from Armstrong in their highly publicized interview that was recorded Monday in Austin, Texas. After establishing the ground rules (nothing off-limits), Winfrey began with a series of yes-or-no questions.
SPORTS
January 17, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire
Lance Armstrong calmly told Oprah Winfrey in a highly anticipated taped television interview Thursday night that he took a variety of performance-enhancing drugs while winning a record seven Tour de France titles, but that in his mind at the time, he didn't consider it cheating. At the start of a stunning question-and-answer exchange, the disgraced rider responded to a series of yes-or-no questions, answering affirmatively when asked whether he had taken specific drugs during a period when he was one of the most celebrated athletes in the world.
SPORTS
October 22, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
An hour or so after Lance Armstrong was stripped of his seven Tour de France titles by UCI, cycling's international governing body, U.S. Anti-Doping Agency Chief Executive Travis Tygart released a statement saying he was pleased with UCI's decision: “Today, the UCI made the right decision in the Lance Armstrong case.  Despite its prior opposition to USADA's investigation into doping on the U.S. Postal Service cycling team and within the sport,...
SPORTS
August 24, 2012 | By Lance Pugmire
The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency Friday disqualified famed cyclist Lance Armstrong's seven Tour de France titles and imposed a lifetime competition ban “as a result of his anti-doping rules violations,” the agency announced. “Mr. Armstrong chose not to contest the fact that he engaged in doping violations from at least August 1, 1998, and participated in a conspiracy to cover up his actions,” USADA wrote in a statement. USADA said Armstrong, 40, had until midnight Thursday to contest evidence against him in an arbitration hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2012 | By Barry Stavro, Los Angeles Times
George B. Rathmann, a far-sighted entrepreneur whose small team of talented scientists created two blockbuster drugs that helped turn his upstart Thousand Oaks firm, Amgen Inc., into the world's most successful biotech company, died Sundayat his Palo Alto home. He was 84. The cause was complications from pneumonia, according to his son, Richard. Biotechnology was still an embryonic business when Amgen opened in 1980. More than a quarter of a century after James Watson and Francis Crick had discovered DNA, the twisting molecular structure that carries life's genetic blueprint, the elaborate science of isolating key genes in the laboratory continued to elude researchers.
SPORTS
May 19, 2011 | By Diane Pucin
Olympic cycling gold-medal winner Tyler Hamilton, who served a two-year suspension for doping, detailed for CBS' "60 Minutes" how he, Lance Armstrong and other members of the U.S. Postal Service team used banned substances. Armstrong, who won a record seven Tour de France races, is being investigated by Jeff Novitzky, the federal prosecutor who spearheaded an examination of BALCO, the laboratory that allegedly supplied baseball star Barry Bonds with steroids. In the "60 Minutes" interview, part of which was aired on the "CBS Evening News" broadcast Thursday, Hamilton says team members used several banned substances, including EPO and testosterone.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | BARRY STAVRO, Times Staff Writer
A genetically engineered drug expected to relieve the chronic anemia suffered by thousands of people with kidney disease was approved for sale Thursday by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The drug also has shown promise in treating anemia in AIDS and cancer patients, but it was not yet approved for those uses by the government. The announcement capped an eight-year effort by Amgen Inc. of Thousand Oaks to bring to market what is expected to be one of biotechnology's first blockbuster drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2012 | By Barry Stavro, Los Angeles Times
George B. Rathmann, a far-sighted entrepreneur whose small team of talented scientists created two blockbuster drugs that helped turn his upstart Thousand Oaks firm, Amgen Inc., into the world's most successful biotech company, died Sundayat his Palo Alto home. He was 84. The cause was complications from pneumonia, according to his son, Richard. Biotechnology was still an embryonic business when Amgen opened in 1980. More than a quarter of a century after James Watson and Francis Crick had discovered DNA, the twisting molecular structure that carries life's genetic blueprint, the elaborate science of isolating key genes in the laboratory continued to elude researchers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Eugene Goldwasser, the biochemist who isolated and purified the anti- anemia protein erythropoietin ? arguably the most important biological drug since insulin ? died Friday at his home in Chicago of kidney failure associated with prostate cancer. He was 88. Erythropoietin, commonly known as EPO, was one of the first blockbuster drugs of the biotechnology industry and was the foundation for the success of Amgen of Thousand Oaks. Yet neither the University of Chicago, where Goldwasser isolated the drug, nor the National Institutes of Health, which funded his work, chose to patent the discovery, and Goldwasser himself never got around to it. "One percent of 1% of the drug's annual revenues would have funded my lab quite handsomely," he later reflected.
HEALTH
July 28, 2008 | Karen Ravn, Special to The Times
When three cyclists got caught using the banned drug EPO this month, they were forced to take an abrupt detour from the Tour de France -- and perhaps from their riding careers. Of course, even as some ponder the psychological motivations driving elite athletes, others are left wondering about more basic issues, such as: What is EPO? EPO is the acronym for erythropoietin, a hormone that stimulates bone marrow to produce red blood cells. Everybody needs this hormone.
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