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Epogen Drug

BUSINESS
January 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Services, Reuters
A federal court ruling preserving Amgen's patent on its blockbuster anemia-fighting drug Epogen sparked a rally among biotech stocks Monday--as well as a debate about patents and the ethics of drug pricing.
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BUSINESS
January 20, 2001 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge ruled Friday in favor of Amgen Inc., the world's largest biotechnology company, in a closely watched patent dispute that's expected to impact the entire biotech industry and the development of new genetically engineered drugs. U.S. District Judge William Young in Boston found that Amgen, based in Thousand Oaks, proved that three of its patents covering its blockbuster anti-anemia drug Epogen were "valid, enforceable and infringed" by Transkaryotic Therapies Inc.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2000 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The start of the Summer Olympics in Australia has recast the spotlight on biotech giant Amgen Inc., the discoverer, producer and licenser of what has become one of the most abused sports-performance drugs in history: Epogen. In the 11-year history of Epogen--the brand name for a drug that mimics the natural hormone known as erythropoietin (EPO)--Thousand Oaks-based Amgen has faced sporadic complaints over its refusal to make the drug traceable through drug testing.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2000 | Bloomberg News
An Amgen Inc. lawyer testified before a federal judge that the company's application for a patent covering its top-selling anemia drug Epogen was based on the "best information" available at the time. Michael Borun, under questioning by an attorney for rival drug maker Transkaryotic Therapies Inc., denied knowingly providing patent examiners with false information.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Amgen Inc. won a preliminary victory Friday in its patent dispute with Transkaryotic Therapies Inc. over the best-selling anemia drug Epogen. U.S. District Judge William Young limited Transkaryotic's ability to claim Amgen's patents are invalid. The judge postponed until at least September a final ruling in the patent fight. Young reserved judgment on whether Transkaryotic infringed Amgen's patents and certain other defenses. The judge has been trying the case without a jury since May.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2000 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past three weeks, a hundred or more patent attorneys, Wall Street analysts and journalists have been filing into Boston's harborside federal courthouse, where Amgen Inc. finds itself in the middle of one of the most widely watched patent trials of the biotech era. Judge William G.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2000 | From Bloomberg News
Shares of Thousand Oaks-based Amgen Inc. rose 4%, gaining for a second day, as analysts said the world's No. 1 biotechnology company won an early round over rival Transkaryotic Therapies Inc. in a patent dispute involving Amgen's best-selling drug. U.S. District Judge William Young in Boston supported several Amgen claims during the last two days in a preliminary hearing over patents on Amgen's best-selling product, the $1.8-billion-a-year anemia treatment Epogen.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2000 |
Shares of Amgen Inc. rose 9% Monday as the world's biggest biotechnology company went to court for preliminary hearings on its bid to keep rival Transkaryotic Therapies Inc. from introducing a version of Amgen's blockbuster anemia drug Epogen in the U.S. Amgen shares rose $5.81 to close at $60.38 on the Nasdaq Stock Market. Transkaryotic shares fell $7.88, or 10%, to close at $70.25, also on Nasdaq. At stake is one of the world's top-selling medicines.
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