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Equal Employment Opportunities Commission

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NEWS
July 31, 1985
The General Accounting Office has agreed to pay $3.5 million to more than 300 current and former black workers who accused the investigative arm of Congress of racial discrimination, lawyers in the case and the GAO announced in Washington. The agreement ends two class-action complaints filed with the GAO and the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission. The settlement affects blacks who were denied equal opportunities for promotion to upper-level positions from 1976 to the present.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2012 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
A former soldier and police officer who transitioned from male to female has been allowed to proceed with a complaint against the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives alleging job discrimination based on gender. A ruling this week by the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is being seen as clarifying that rules of employment law apply to transgender people, who may file complaints under federal anti-discrimination statutes. In an email to The Times, EEOC spokeswoman Christine Nazer wrote that the ruling is now "the EEOC's position, and we will apply it in all our enforcement activities" under Title VII of the federal Civil Rights Act, which prohibits job discrimination based on race, sex, religion and national origin.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1990 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has issued a preliminary injunction allowing Lockheed Corp. test pilot Kenneth M. Weir to continue flying until a court rules on whether the aerospace firm can legally ground its pilots when they reach the age of 60. "I'm real excited, I'm thrilled to death," Weir said from his Santa Ana home Tuesday. "I'm going to fly (today). I'm gonna take off on a U-2 and go smoking off." U.S. District Judge Terry J. Hatter Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2011 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
In its largest farm labor trafficking case ever, the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on Wednesday charged a Beverly Hills-based firm and eight farms with severe abuse and discrimination involving more than 200 Thai farmworkers. Federal attorneys alleged that Global Horizons Manpower Inc., a labor contracting firm headed by Israel native Mordechai Orian, subjected workers in Hawaii and Washington to violence, inadequate pay and nutrition, rat-infested housing, and other illegal conditions based on their national origin and race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1992 | from Times Staff and Wire Reports
The general manager of a firm being sued by the federal government for allegedly discriminating against an employee who spoke English with a foreign accent said Saturday that he was surprised by the charge. Roy Fujishige, general manager of Eiki International, said that he has not heard directly from the federal government's Equal Employment Opportunity Commission about the litigation.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2010 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
Teresa Sanchez, a former janitor, described being touched inappropriately by her supervisor and being fired after she complained about it. "I asked for help and they wouldn't help me, and instead my supervisor would laugh at me even more," Sanchez said. "It was easier for the company to let me go and that's what they did. " Sanchez spoke at a downtown Los Angeles news conference Thursday, where the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission announced a $5.8-million settlement with Sanchez's former employer, ABM Industries Inc. of New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2011 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
In its largest farm labor trafficking case ever, the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on Wednesday charged a Beverly Hills-based firm and eight farms with severe abuse and discrimination involving more than 200 Thai farmworkers. Federal attorneys alleged that Global Horizons Manpower Inc., a labor contracting firm headed by Israel native Mordechai Orian, subjected workers in Hawaii and Washington to violence, inadequate pay and nutrition, rat-infested housing, and other illegal conditions based on their national origin and race.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2012 | By Sam Quinones, Los Angeles Times
A former soldier and police officer who transitioned from male to female has been allowed to proceed with a complaint against the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives alleging job discrimination based on gender. A ruling this week by the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is being seen as clarifying that rules of employment law apply to transgender people, who may file complaints under federal anti-discrimination statutes. In an email to The Times, EEOC spokeswoman Christine Nazer wrote that the ruling is now "the EEOC's position, and we will apply it in all our enforcement activities" under Title VII of the federal Civil Rights Act, which prohibits job discrimination based on race, sex, religion and national origin.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The federal agency that enforces workplace anti-discrimination laws is warning employers they could be sued if they refuse to hire blacks or Latinos because of a bad credit history or a criminal record. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission last week sued Kaplan Higher Education Corp., accusing the company of using "a selection criterion for hiring and discharge ? namely, credit history information ? that has had a significant disparate impact on black job applicants. " The lawsuit is part of a stepped-up but controversial effort to eliminate "arbitrary barriers" to employment for minorities by the EEOC, which is governed by five commissioners, three appointed by President Obama.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1985 | From United Press International
A Knudsen dairy in East Los Angeles was sued Monday by the federal Equal Employment Opportunities Commission for allegedly refusing to hire women for other than clerical jobs. The lawsuit asks a federal judge to bar further discrimination, establish affirmative action programs and award back pay to women who were unjustly denied such jobs as sour cream filler and yogurt helper at the Knudsen plant at 231 East 23rd Street, attorney Carla Barboza said.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
The federal agency that enforces workplace anti-discrimination laws is warning employers they could be sued if they refuse to hire blacks or Latinos because of a bad credit history or a criminal record. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission last week sued Kaplan Higher Education Corp., accusing the company of using "a selection criterion for hiring and discharge ? namely, credit history information ? that has had a significant disparate impact on black job applicants. " The lawsuit is part of a stepped-up but controversial effort to eliminate "arbitrary barriers" to employment for minorities by the EEOC, which is governed by five commissioners, three appointed by President Obama.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2010 | By Nathan Olivarez-Giles, Los Angeles Times
Teresa Sanchez, a former janitor, described being touched inappropriately by her supervisor and being fired after she complained about it. "I asked for help and they wouldn't help me, and instead my supervisor would laugh at me even more," Sanchez said. "It was easier for the company to let me go and that's what they did. " Sanchez spoke at a downtown Los Angeles news conference Thursday, where the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission announced a $5.8-million settlement with Sanchez's former employer, ABM Industries Inc. of New York.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1992 | from Times Staff and Wire Reports
The general manager of a firm being sued by the federal government for allegedly discriminating against an employee who spoke English with a foreign accent said Saturday that he was surprised by the charge. Roy Fujishige, general manager of Eiki International, said that he has not heard directly from the federal government's Equal Employment Opportunity Commission about the litigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1990 | MARIA NEWMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge has issued a preliminary injunction allowing Lockheed Corp. test pilot Kenneth M. Weir to continue flying until a court rules on whether the aerospace firm can legally ground its pilots when they reach the age of 60. "I'm real excited, I'm thrilled to death," Weir said from his Santa Ana home Tuesday. "I'm going to fly (today). I'm gonna take off on a U-2 and go smoking off." U.S. District Judge Terry J. Hatter Jr.
NEWS
July 31, 1985
The General Accounting Office has agreed to pay $3.5 million to more than 300 current and former black workers who accused the investigative arm of Congress of racial discrimination, lawyers in the case and the GAO announced in Washington. The agreement ends two class-action complaints filed with the GAO and the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission. The settlement affects blacks who were denied equal opportunities for promotion to upper-level positions from 1976 to the present.
NEWS
March 4, 1992
In Beverly Beyette's article on the evolution of NOW and the women's movement, she quotes former Equal Employment Opportunities Commission Chairman Richard Graham (a NOW founding vice president) as saying that NOW should focus on issues on which everyone can agree, such as health care and child care. He obviously looks with disdain on the less palatable issues confronting women--abortion, sexual harassment and sexual orientation. Closets are for clothes. All of these issues are important and must be discussed.
NEWS
November 22, 1987
Charging favoritism to Mormons in the FBI's Los Angeles office, Agent Paul P. Magallanes has asked a federal judge in Texas to order the FBI to return him to the bureau's Ventura office and to give him back his gun and FBI car. Magallanes, who is Latino, said in his petition for an injunction filed Friday that he was transferred from his home in Ventura to Los Angeles as punishment for testifying for another Latino agent, Bernardo (Matt) Perez, during a discrimination suit against the FBI.
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