Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsEqual Opportunity Employment Commission
IN THE NEWS

Equal Opportunity Employment Commission

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 21, 1989 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission failed to act last year on more than 200 age discrimination cases before the statute of limitations expired, EEOC Chairman Clarence Thomas told a hostile congressional hearing on Monday, a year after he had promised to improve the agency's performance. "It is troubling that . . . the agency charged with protecting victims of age discrimination has continued to allow over 200 age discrimination charges to die of old age," said Rep.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 21, 1989 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT, Times Staff Writer
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission failed to act last year on more than 200 age discrimination cases before the statute of limitations expired, EEOC Chairman Clarence Thomas told a hostile congressional hearing on Monday, a year after he had promised to improve the agency's performance. "It is troubling that . . . the agency charged with protecting victims of age discrimination has continued to allow over 200 age discrimination charges to die of old age," said Rep.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1985 | JANE APPLEGATE, Times Staff Writer
A judge Monday set a June 3 trial date for a suit brought by a former receptionist and secretary for a major Irvine computer company accusing her boss and two co-workers of sexually harassing her. Debra L. Lansdorp, 31, of Santa Ana filed the $1-million suit in U.S. District Court against Western Digital Corp. in August. In court documents, the company denies all of Lansdorp's allegations of sexual harassment. Company officials said Monday they would not comment on the suit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1993 | From Associated Press
A Jewish postal worker won his fight to wear a skullcap uncovered while delivering mail when the federal Equal Opportunity Employment Commission ruled in his favor. "I think I've struck a blow for religious freedom," postal carrier Howard Singer said of the decision, which was based on civil rights laws that prohibit religious discrimination. The federal agency's decision, which took effect Monday, also could affect other postal employees who want to wear religious garments because the U.S.
NEWS
July 16, 1991 | RENA MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government may be the No. 1 enforcer of the nation's equal employment opportunity laws, but Uncle Sam still has a long way to go before becoming a model employer himself. When it comes to women and minorities, the federal work force shows many of the unequal characteristics that mark the American work force as a whole. Significant disparities exist in hiring, pay and opportunities for promotion, government statistics show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1990 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal authorities are questioning Carlsbad's efforts at affirmative action because the number of ethnic minorities employed at City Hall is not keeping pace with the city's growth, officials acknowledged Tuesday. Tony Gallegos, a commissioner on the U.S. Equal Opportunity Employment Commission in Washington, sent a letter to Mayor Bud Lewis requesting more information on Carlsbad's affirmative action plan, said Ann Jensen, human resources director for the city.
NEWS
February 25, 1986 | TED ROHRLICH, Times Staff Writer
Middle- and upper-class blacks have come to vastly outnumber poor blacks, a historic reversal from 40 years ago, according to a Rand Corp. study released Monday. Relying on data from five censuses, Rand reported a "spectacular" growth in the size of the black middle class from 1940 to 1980. In 1940, the study said, 24% of black men were middle or upper class, as compared to 70% of white men. By 1980, 80% of black men were middle or upper class, as compared to 89% of white men.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Senate Democrats, after persuading Anita Faye Hill to testify about charges of sexual harassment against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas, offered the University of Oklahoma law professor little protection from a slashing campaign orchestrated by the White House to impugn her character and portray her as a perjurer after she testified Friday.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|