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Equal Rights Amendment

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NATIONAL
March 28, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
. Federal and state lawmakers have launched a drive to revive the Equal Rights Amendment, revisiting a feminist goal that faltered 25 years ago when the measure did not gain approval by three-quarters of state legislatures. The constitutional amendment, which came three states short of enactment in 1982, has been introduced in five state legislatures since January.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 14, 2007
Re "The ERA: still a bad idea," Current, April 8 Even after three years of law school and 10 years of practice, I am completely baffled by Phyllis Schlafly's analysis of the 1972 Equal Rights Amendment. On its face, the amendment did no more than prohibit the denial or abridgement of rights based on gender. Yet Schlafly insists that it "would actually have taken away some of women's rights." Nonsense. The ERA harbors no potential to subject women to military conscription (even assuming Congress were to reinstate the draft)
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BOOKS
November 9, 1986 | Mara Braverman, Braverman is a lawyer and writer based in West Hartford, Conn. and
When the equal rights amendment was introduced in Congress in 1972, it quickly garnered the necessary majority in each house and was sent to the states for their consideration. Hawaii ratified the amendment the same day as Congress, and 34 other states quickly followed. But the ERA was never able to gain the approval of another three states to reach the necessary 38 state majority. In 1980, it died.
OPINION
April 8, 2007 | Phyllis Schlafly, PHYLLIS SCHLAFLY, the author of 20 books, is the president of Eagle Forum, a national pro-family volunteer organization. eagleforum.org.
NEARLY 25 years after the defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment, feminists and their political supporters, who now control Congress, are back at it. Last month, the constitutional measure, now dubbed the Women's Equality Amendment, was reintroduced in the Senate and House, and its prospects, according to one advocate, "are better now than they have been in a very, very long time." But ERA Retro is doomed.
OPINION
April 8, 2007 | Phyllis Schlafly, PHYLLIS SCHLAFLY, the author of 20 books, is the president of Eagle Forum, a national pro-family volunteer organization. eagleforum.org.
NEARLY 25 years after the defeat of the Equal Rights Amendment, feminists and their political supporters, who now control Congress, are back at it. Last month, the constitutional measure, now dubbed the Women's Equality Amendment, was reintroduced in the Senate and House, and its prospects, according to one advocate, "are better now than they have been in a very, very long time." But ERA Retro is doomed.
NEWS
January 7, 1987
The Equal Rights Amendment was introduced in the 100th Congress, and feminists said they would use the bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution to emphasize that women are still without equal rights. Supporters said they hoped that with Democrats in control of both the Senate and the House, the proposed constitutional amendment banning discrimination based on gender would meet with a better fate than the past.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1996
Thank you for allowing me the opportunity to respond to Wendy Larner's comments labeling the National Women's Political Caucus as "a radical liberal organization." From her position on the political spectrum, Larner may indeed consider us out of the political mainstream, but our bottom-line issues are in fact in line with most moderates. The National Women's Political Caucus is a nonpartisan organization of Republicans, Democrats and independents. NWPC supports viable women candidates of any political affiliation who meet our bottom-line issues: comparable worth--equal pay for equal worth; support the Equal Rights Amendment--nondiscrimination based on gender; pro-choice--a woman's right to reproductive self-determination, and promote quality child care and government support for same.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1992
Iowa's voters will decide on Nov. 3 whether to amend their state constitution to outlaw sex discrimination. That prospect leaves evangelist Pat Robertson aghast. Pitching for money to defeat the proposed equal rights amendment Robertson, in a fund-raising letter, assures Iowans that the measure is simply a ploy by "radical feminists" to further their "secret agenda" of waging "open war on the American family."
NEWS
November 2, 1992 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX
Native Iowan and Los Angeles resident Abigail Van Buren is lending "Dear Abby's" support to the campaign for the Iowa Equal Rights Amendment this year. The Sioux City Central High graduate has made a 30-second TV commercial--her first political one--for the Iowa Women's Equality Campaign appealing directly to voters to "add women to the constitution." If passed, Iowa will become the 16th state to put sex equality provisions into its constitution.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
. Federal and state lawmakers have launched a drive to revive the Equal Rights Amendment, revisiting a feminist goal that faltered 25 years ago when the measure did not gain approval by three-quarters of state legislatures. The constitutional amendment, which came three states short of enactment in 1982, has been introduced in five state legislatures since January.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2000 | JAMES E. FOWLER
Saturday is Women's Equality Day, marking the 80th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment granting American women the right to vote. * Seventy-two years before that event, women's suffrage was first seriously proposed at a women's rights convention in Seneca Falls, N.Y.
NEWS
October 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
Iowa state Rep. Minnette Doderer has chalked up many accomplishments in a 34-year legislative career, but she thinks the list has one notable blank spot: no Equal Rights Amendment for women. "I've always said I want it to be in the Constitution before I die," the 75-year-old Democrat from Iowa City says. "A worthy goal." Doderer's time may have come.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1998
Re "Perspectives on Women in the Military," Commentary, June 24: As a retired female military member, I deeply resent Col. M. Thomas Davis' inference that where military women and men are concerned, sex always "gets in the way." Evidently, if a professional working relationship exists between men in a unit, it's called "esprit de corps," but if the same occurs between men and women, it will lead inevitably to sexual debauchery? What nonsense. And to imply that women would welcome segregation in basic training, as if it is the only alternative to being forced to shower with or relieve ourselves in front of men, is patently absurd!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1996
Thank you for allowing me the opportunity to respond to Wendy Larner's comments labeling the National Women's Political Caucus as "a radical liberal organization." From her position on the political spectrum, Larner may indeed consider us out of the political mainstream, but our bottom-line issues are in fact in line with most moderates. The National Women's Political Caucus is a nonpartisan organization of Republicans, Democrats and independents. NWPC supports viable women candidates of any political affiliation who meet our bottom-line issues: comparable worth--equal pay for equal worth; support the Equal Rights Amendment--nondiscrimination based on gender; pro-choice--a woman's right to reproductive self-determination, and promote quality child care and government support for same.
NEWS
May 16, 1993 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 350 women, some wearing holy undergarments from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, gathered here recently to pray, sing hymns and give their testimonies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1990
Although I am slightly Victorian in my dealings with women, I am certainly no chauvinist. I see nothing wrong with opening a door, helping a lady on with her coat, etc. I do not disagree with the Equal Rights Amendment women have been pursuing for the past however many years. Are they entitled to a double standard? Is anyone? I think not--and that is why I was so appalled by Carol Tavris' position in "Boys Trample Girls' Turf" (Commentary, May 7). How dare she (and the protesting females at Mills College)
NEWS
September 9, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
The new president of the National Organization for Women and one of her aides were arrested Tuesday outside the Vatican Embassy, where they were protesting what they called the Roman Catholic Church's betrayal of women's rights. Molly Yard and her press secretary, Jeanne K.C. Clark, were handcuffed and placed into a waiting police van after delivering a symbolic "last lunch" to the embassy door and displaying a large banner at the edge of the embassy lawn.
NEWS
April 24, 1993 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The landmark 1963 "March on Washington" is now a cherished part of American history--including the stirring "I have a dream" speech of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.--that struck a chord with millions of people who adopted a new view of the long struggle for racial equality. Its legacy is so enduring, in fact, that Sunday's gay march on Washington has drawn its inspiration and some of its themes from that event of three decades ago.
NEWS
November 2, 1992 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX
Native Iowan and Los Angeles resident Abigail Van Buren is lending "Dear Abby's" support to the campaign for the Iowa Equal Rights Amendment this year. The Sioux City Central High graduate has made a 30-second TV commercial--her first political one--for the Iowa Women's Equality Campaign appealing directly to voters to "add women to the constitution." If passed, Iowa will become the 16th state to put sex equality provisions into its constitution.
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